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For Command Line parsing in Java, I typically use Apache Commons CLI. Can anybody recommend any alternative libraries?

Thank you! J.

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6  
If you're going to ask for an alternative to what you normally use, it would be useful if you'd say what you're looking for that your normal option doesn't provide. –  Jon Skeet Jul 22 '10 at 13:22
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To be honest, I didn't have a particular missing feature in mind. True, Apache Commons CLI is 'tried and tested', but it is also pretty verbose. I was just wondering if anybody introduced any new ideas in this area. In this category, I think I'm going to have a closer look at the JCommander suggestion below. –  Jan Jul 22 '10 at 13:58
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possible duplicate of Is there a good command line argument parser for Java? –  Guido García Aug 13 '10 at 11:38
    
At least for me, the Commons CLI has a number of architectural issues. Its OptionBuilder isn't really a Builder, tree-like commands aren't really supported, and there isn't support for user-defined types. –  David Ehrmann Jan 27 '14 at 18:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

JCommander sounds like a very simple and interesting approach to parsing command line arguments with annotations (from the creator of TestNG):

You annotate fields with descriptions of your options:

import com.beust.jcommander.Parameter;

public class JCommanderTest {
  @Parameter
  public List<String> parameters = Lists.newArrayList();

  @Parameter(names = { "-log", "-verbose" }, description = "Level of verbosity")
  public Integer verbose = 1;

  @Parameter(names = "-groups", description = "Comma-separated list of group names to be run")
  public String groups;

  @Parameter(names = "-debug", description = "Debug mode")
  public boolean debug = false;
}

and then you simply ask JCommander to parse:

JCommanderTest jct = new JCommanderTest();
String[] argv = { "-log", "2", "-groups", "unit", "a", "b", "c" };
new JCommander(jct, argv);

Assert.assertEquals(jct.verbose.intValue(), 2);
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This is how Cederic introduced it: beust.com/weblog/2010/07/13/announcing-jcommander-1-0 –  Jan Jul 22 '10 at 14:17
    
Couldn't find an API to print the help. See related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/30046171/… –  AlikElzin-kilaka May 5 at 7:04

Does this answer help? http://stackoverflow.com/questions/367706/is-there-a-good-command-line-argument-parser-for-java

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I appreciate these links to alternative frameworks and I have to admit I didn't notice this very similar question. However, I was hoping to reach somebody who actually tried different alternatives and who is able to recommend one of those. –  Jan Jul 22 '10 at 14:08
    
In the respect, this is the kind of article I was looking for: furiouspurpose.blogspot.com/2008/07/… Thank you! –  Jan Jul 22 '10 at 14:21

I see a few listed here command line interpreters

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At java-source.net you can find at least 4 other alternative libraries to Apache Commons CLI.

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I use args4J at https://args4j.dev.java.net/

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getopt-1.0.11 is a simple easy to use lightweight library I used once for command line arguements parsing

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I use and like

http://martiansoftware.com/jsap/

its open source, simple. Its not active, I think the author has other irons in the fire.

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You could try commandline (pretty anonymous name, I know )

It uses annotations to map command line arguments into an object model. A couple of parsing modes and a set of annotations that can be combined in various ways allows you to create pretty advanced command line option rules.

While it allows you to map the command line arguments directly onto your domain model, you should consider using separate classes for the command line arguments.

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