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Per this old thread, using svn 1.5, reintegrating a branch multiple times is problematic, and should be avoided.

There has been some rumbling to the effect that, "This is a known issue, and should be fixed in svn 1.6." Does anyone know whether that was the case? Is it fixed? Can I reintegrate multiple times?

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Let's be more specific. For the purposes of this question, I don't care whether I should be reintegrating. That's a different question. For now, I want to know how to reintegrate multiple times. –  Andres Jaan Tack Jul 23 '10 at 8:20
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2 Answers

up vote 55 down vote accepted

To merge a branch topic into the trunk repeatedly: Do the following on every merge.

  1. svn merge --reintegrate <topic> <trunk>, as you would normally. (=> rM)
  2. svn merge --record-only -c M ^/<trunk> <topic>. Note the record-only option.

Step 2 essentially tells the topic branch to consider the merge commit (revision M, from step 1) part of its history. This merge-revision is the one that usually causes problems during reintegration; svn tries to undo rM when integrating topic a second time.

So, repeated reintegration works, just not automatically. :)

I eventually found this solution through an enlightening commit message to the svn source and the matching test (search for "def multiple_reintegrates"). This is a "clever trick" discovered and used by svn-devs with the current releases. It's even been added to more recent documentation. The result is still not as good as a DVCS's merging properties, but it's at least functional.

The only broad downside (as per an open issue as of June 2, 2010) is that apparently the svn log -g output is messy. I guess this is the risk.

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They eventually added this to the docs: svnbook.red-bean.com/nightly/en/… –  JW. Jul 22 '10 at 21:51
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Holy crap. That explanation would have been so much easier to parse. I've added it to the answer. A+ –  Andres Jaan Tack Jul 22 '10 at 21:56
    
Can this handle merging from trunk into the branch (as well as vice versa)? I.e., --record-only the trunk->branch merge as well? –  JeeBee Apr 24 '13 at 8:30
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While 1.6 did indeed fix issues with merge tracking, I don't think you can re-use an integrated branch.

But this is not an issue. Since the branch got fully integrated into the trunk, just delete it and create a new branch (with the same name) in its place.

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Any references? –  Andres Jaan Tack Jul 22 '10 at 18:39
    
@Andres: How do you propose I find references that a certain thing (the ability to repeatedly reintegrate) does not exist? The SVN book 1.5 says reintegration renders a branch useless (at the end of svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.5/…). Free free to browse the release infos for SVN 1.6 (subversion.apache.org/docs/release-notes/1.6.html and svn.apache.org/repos/asf/subversion/tags/1.6.12/CHANGES) for anything rendering this information stale. –  sbi Jul 22 '10 at 18:53
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"I don't think you can..." isn't very credible. An example, an updated reference, something that isn't a book on v1.5... –  Andres Jaan Tack Jul 22 '10 at 20:21
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@Andres - I think you are confusing simple merging and reintegration. In a release branch (1.0) forward propagating bug fixes to trunk is fine, this does not require reintegrating the branch - It is simply a merge of certain revisions. –  Joshua McKinnon Jul 23 '10 at 0:40
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This post is the svn merge bible for me and may shed some light: blogs.open.collab.net/svn/2008/07/subversion-merg.html While 1.6 did some cleanup on cases that mergeinfos are created, I don't think it alters how --reintegrate merges work. You typically only reintegrate feature branches. The rest are plain old merges, tracked fine by both 1.5 and 1.6. –  Joshua McKinnon Jul 23 '10 at 0:44
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