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I'm refactoring some objects that are serialized to XML but need to keep a few properties for backwards compatibility, I've got a method that converts the old object into the new one for me and nulls the obsolete property. I want to use the Obsolete attribute to tell other developers not to use this property but it is causing the property to be ignored by the XmlSerializer.

Similar Code:

[Serializable]
public class MySerializableObject
{
    private MyObject _oldObject;
    private MyObject _anotherOldObject;

    private MyObject _newBetterObject;

    [Obsolete("Use new properties in NewBetterObject to prevent duplication")]
    public MyObject OldObject
    {
      get { return _oldObject; }
      set { _oldObject = value; }
    }

    [Obsolete("Use new properties in NewBetterObject to prevent duplication")]
    public MyObject AnotherOldObject
    {
      get { return _anotherOldObject; }
      set { _anotherOldObject = value; }
    }

    public MyObject NewBetterObject
    {
      get { return _anotherOldObject; }
      set { _anotherOldObject = value; }
    } 
}

Any ideas on a workaround? My best solution is to write obsolete in the XML comments...

Update: I'm using .NET 2.0

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You may try the following workaround:

add a method named

ShouldSerializeOldObject ()
{
   return true;
}

ShouldSerializeAnotherOldObject ()
{
   return true
}

this may override the obsolete Attribute

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1  
Not sure I understand what you're suggesting here... –  Rob Stevenson-Leggett Dec 1 '08 at 14:51
    
by adding a method "ShouldSerialize*" you tell the XmlSerializer if you want the Property to be serialized (normally used in cases where - i don't know - you just want to serialize an int value if it's larger than 5 it MAY work here too –  Bluenuance Dec 1 '08 at 14:57
    
Ah thanks, I'll give it a try –  Rob Stevenson-Leggett Dec 1 '08 at 15:46
1  
It didn't work for me... the ShouldSerialize method was only invoked for non obsolete properties. Also note that your properties should be also decorated with DefaultValue(null) for the corresponding ShouldSerialize method to be invoked. –  JCallico Jul 11 '11 at 21:00
1  
Did this method actually work for someone? It is marked as answer, but I can't find documentation to support this use (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/53b8022e.aspx) and it doesn't work for me. –  jv42 Jan 12 '12 at 17:23

EDIT: After reading a MS Connect article, it appears that .Net 2.0 has a 'feature' where it makes ObsoleteAttribute equivalent to XmlIgnoreAttribute without any notification in the documentation. So I'm going to revise my answer to say that the only way to have your cake and eat it too in this instance is to follow @Will's advice and implement serialization manually. This will be your only future proof way of including Obsolete properties in your XML. It is not pretty in .Net 2.0, but .Net 3.0+ can make life easier.

From XmlSerializer:

Objects marked with the Obsolete Attribute no longer serialized In the .NET Framework 3.5 the XmlSerializer class no longer serializes objects that are marked as [Obsolete].

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1  
He's looking for a workaround. –  Will Dec 1 '08 at 14:35
    
@Will: it does pose a strange problem seeing as how .Net 2.0 should allow it. –  user7116 Dec 1 '08 at 14:37
    
I'm also using .net2 of which has no mention of this in the same article for the correct version –  Rob Stevenson-Leggett Dec 1 '08 at 14:37
    
I think when we move from .NET 2 we'll drop the backwards compatability anyway so it won't be a problem. –  Rob Stevenson-Leggett Dec 1 '08 at 14:43
9  
What a horrible decision to combine the functionality of Obsolete and XmlIgnore. They had two very distinct purposes. –  xr280xr Apr 18 '11 at 17:22

1) WAG: Try adding the XmlAttributeAttribute to the property; perhaps this will override the ObsoleteAttribute
2) PITA: Implement IXmlSerializable

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2  
#1 does not work, sadly –  Carson63000 Aug 22 '12 at 6:15
1  
@Carson63000: But #2 does. Its just a pain in the ass. If you're looking at doing serialization now, I'd suggest avoiding the xml serializer and go with the DataContractSerializer, NetDataContractSerializer or even xaml serialization, depending on your needs/abilities. And there are other options, too, like serializing to json or protobuf (our own Marc Gravell runs protobuf.net, btw). Lots more options nowadays than back in '08 –  Will Aug 22 '12 at 12:44

Another workaround is to subscribe to XmlSerializer.UnknownElement, when creating the serializer for the datatype, and then fix old data that way.

http://weblogs.asp.net/psteele/archive/2011/01/31/xml-serialization-and-the-obsolete-attribute.aspx

Maybe consider to have the method for subscribing as a static method on the class for datatype.

static void serializer_UnknownElement(object sender, XmlElementEventArgs e)
{
    if( e.Element.Name != "Hobbies")
    {
        return;
    }

    var target = (MyData) e.ObjectBeingDeserialized;
    foreach(XmlElement hobby in e.Element.ChildNodes)
    {
        target.Hobbies.Add(hobby.InnerText);
        target.HobbyData.Add(new Hobby{Name = hobby.InnerText});
    }
}
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I have struggled with this a lot - there is no solution other than doing serialization manually or using another serializer.

However, instead of writing shims for each obsolete property which quickly becomes a pain, you could consider adding an Obsolete prefix to property names (e.g. Foo becomes ObsoleteFoo. This will not generate a compiler warning like the attribute will, but at least it's visible in code.

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