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I need three fast-on-large-strings functions: fast search, fast search and replace, and fast count of substrings in a string.

I have run into Boyer-Moore string searches in C++ and Python, but the only Delphi Boyer-Moore algorithm used to implement fast search and replace that I have found is part of the FastStrings by Peter Morris, formerly of DroopyEyes software, and his website and email are no longer working.

I have already ported FastStrings forward to work great for AnsiStrings in Delphi 2009/2010, where a byte is equal to one AnsiChar, but making them also work with the String (UnicodeString) in Delphi 2010 appears non-trivial.

Using this Boyer-Moore algorithm, it should be possible to easily do case insensitive searches, as well as case-insensitive search and replace, without any temporary string (using StrUpper etc), and without calling Pos() which is slower than Boyer-Moore searching when repeated searches over the same text are required.

(Edit: I have a partial solution, written as an answer to this question, it is almost 100% complete, it even has a fast string replace function. I believe it MUST have bugs, and especially think that since it pretends to be Unicode capable that it must be that there are glitches due to unfulfilled Unicode promises. )

(Edit2: Interesting and unexpected result; The large stack size of a unicode code-point table on the stack - SkipTable in the code below puts a serious damper on the amount of win-win-optimization you can do here in a unicode string boyer-moore string search. Thanks to Florent Ouchet for pointing out what I should have noticed immediately.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This answer is now complete except that the code is not well (Unit) tested, and could probably be optimized further, for example I repeated the local function __SameChar instead of using a comparison function callback which would have been faster, and actually, allowing the user to pass in a comparison function for all these would be great for Unicode users who want to provide some extra logic (equivalent sets of Unicode glyphs for some languages). I do however have a Boyer-Moore based solution for case-insensitive Pos, and faster substring counting, and now search and replace too:

Based on Dorin Dominica's code, I built the following.

{ _FindStringBoyer:
  Boyer-Moore search algorith using regular String instead of AnsiSTring, and no ASM.
  Credited to Dorin Duminica.
}
function _FindStringBoyer(const sString, sPattern: string;
  const bCaseSensitive: Boolean = True; const fromPos: Integer = 1): Integer;

    function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;
    begin
      if bCaseSensitive then
        Result := (sString[StringIndex] = sPattern[PatternIndex])
      else
        Result := (CompareText(sString[StringIndex], sPattern[PatternIndex]) = 0);
    end; // function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;

var
  SkipTable: array [Char] of Integer;
  LengthPattern: Integer;
  LengthString: Integer;
  Index: Integer;
  kIndex: Integer;
  LastMarker: Integer;
  Large: Integer;
  chPattern: Char;
begin
  if fromPos < 1 then
    raise Exception.CreateFmt('Invalid search start position: %d.', [fromPos]);
  LengthPattern := Length(sPattern);
  LengthString := Length(sString);
  for chPattern := Low(Char) to High(Char) do
    SkipTable[chPattern] := LengthPattern;
  for Index := 1 to LengthPattern -1 do
    SkipTable[sPattern[Index]] := LengthPattern - Index;
  Large := LengthPattern + LengthString + 1;
  LastMarker := SkipTable[sPattern[LengthPattern]];
  SkipTable[sPattern[LengthPattern]] := Large;
  Index := fromPos + LengthPattern -1;
  Result := 0;
  while Index <= LengthString do begin
    repeat
      Index := Index + SkipTable[sString[Index]];
    until Index > LengthString;
    if Index <= Large then
      Break
    else
      Index := Index - Large;
    kIndex := 1;
    while (kIndex < LengthPattern) and __SameChar(Index - kIndex, LengthPattern - kIndex) do
      Inc(kIndex);
    if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin
      // Found, return.
      Result := Index - kIndex + 1;
      Index := Index + LengthPattern;
      exit;
    end else begin
      if __SameChar(Index, LengthPattern) then
        Index := Index + LastMarker
      else
        Index := Index + SkipTable[sString[Index]];
    end; // if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin
  end; // while Index <= LengthString do begin
end;

{ Written by Warren, using the above code as a starter, we calculate the SkipTable once, and then count the number of instances of
  a substring inside the main string, at a much faster rate than we
  could have done otherwise.  Another thing that would be great is
  to have a function that returns an array of find-locations,
  which would be way faster to do than repeatedly calling Pos.
}
function _StringCountBoyer(const aSourceString, aFindString : String; Const CaseSensitive : Boolean = TRUE) : Integer;
var
  foundPos:Integer;
  fromPos:Integer;
  Limit:Integer;
  guard:Integer;
  SkipTable: array [Char] of Integer;
  LengthPattern: Integer;
  LengthString: Integer;
  Index: Integer;
  kIndex: Integer;
  LastMarker: Integer;
  Large: Integer;
  chPattern: Char;
    function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;
    begin
      if CaseSensitive then
        Result := (aSourceString[StringIndex] = aFindString[PatternIndex])
      else
        Result := (CompareText(aSourceString[StringIndex], aFindString[PatternIndex]) = 0);
    end; // function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;

begin
  result := 0;
  foundPos := 1;
  fromPos := 1;
  Limit := Length(aSourceString);
  guard := Length(aFindString);
  Index := 0;
  LengthPattern := Length(aFindString);
  LengthString := Length(aSourceString);
  for chPattern := Low(Char) to High(Char) do
    SkipTable[chPattern] := LengthPattern;
  for Index := 1 to LengthPattern -1 do
    SkipTable[aFindString[Index]] := LengthPattern - Index;
  Large := LengthPattern + LengthString + 1;
  LastMarker := SkipTable[aFindString[LengthPattern]];
  SkipTable[aFindString[LengthPattern]] := Large;
  while (foundPos>=1) and (fromPos < Limit) and (Index<Limit) do begin

    Index := fromPos + LengthPattern -1;
    if Index>Limit then
        break;
    kIndex := 0;
    while Index <= LengthString do begin
      repeat
        Index := Index + SkipTable[aSourceString[Index]];
      until Index > LengthString;
      if Index <= Large then
        Break
      else
        Index := Index - Large;
      kIndex := 1;
      while (kIndex < LengthPattern) and __SameChar(Index - kIndex, LengthPattern - kIndex) do
        Inc(kIndex);
      if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin
        // Found, return.
        //Result := Index - kIndex + 1;
        Index := Index + LengthPattern;
        fromPos := Index;
        Inc(Result);
        break;
      end else begin
        if __SameChar(Index, LengthPattern) then
          Index := Index + LastMarker
        else
          Index := Index + SkipTable[aSourceString[Index]];
      end; // if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin
    end; // while Index <= LengthString do begin

  end;
end; 

This is really a nice Algorithm, because:

  • it's way faster to count instances of substring X in string Y this way, magnificently so.
  • For merely replacing Pos() the _FindStringBoyer() is faster than the pure asm version of Pos() contributed to Delphi by FastCode project people, that is currently used for Pos, and if you need the case-insensitivity, you can imagine the performance boost when we don't have to call UpperCase on a 100 megabyte string. (Okay, your strings aren't going to be THAT big. But still, Efficient Algorithms are a Thing of Beauty.)

Okay I wrote a String Replace in Boyer-Moore style:

function _StringReplaceBoyer(const aSourceString, aFindString,aReplaceString : String; Flags: TReplaceFlags) : String;
var
  errors:Integer;
  fromPos:Integer;
  Limit:Integer;
  guard:Integer;
  SkipTable: array [Char] of Integer;
  LengthPattern: Integer;
  LengthString: Integer;
  Index: Integer;
  kIndex: Integer;
  LastMarker: Integer;
  Large: Integer;
  chPattern: Char;
  CaseSensitive:Boolean;
  foundAt:Integer;
  lastFoundAt:Integer;
  copyStartsAt:Integer;
  copyLen:Integer;
    function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;
    begin
      if CaseSensitive then
        Result := (aSourceString[StringIndex] = aFindString[PatternIndex])
      else
        Result := (CompareText(aSourceString[StringIndex], aFindString[PatternIndex]) = 0);
    end; // function __SameChar(StringIndex, PatternIndex: Integer): Boolean;

begin
  result := '';
  lastFoundAt := 0;
  fromPos := 1;
  errors := 0;
  CaseSensitive := rfIgnoreCase in Flags;
  Limit := Length(aSourceString);
  guard := Length(aFindString);
  Index := 0;
  LengthPattern := Length(aFindString);
  LengthString := Length(aSourceString);
  for chPattern := Low(Char) to High(Char) do
    SkipTable[chPattern] := LengthPattern;
  for Index := 1 to LengthPattern -1 do
    SkipTable[aFindString[Index]] := LengthPattern - Index;
  Large := LengthPattern + LengthString + 1;
  LastMarker := SkipTable[aFindString[LengthPattern]];
  SkipTable[aFindString[LengthPattern]] := Large;
  while (fromPos>=1) and (fromPos <= Limit) and (Index<=Limit) do begin

    Index := fromPos + LengthPattern -1;
    if Index>Limit then
        break;
    kIndex := 0;
    foundAt := 0;
    while Index <= LengthString do begin
      repeat
        Index := Index + SkipTable[aSourceString[Index]];
      until Index > LengthString;
      if Index <= Large then
        Break
      else
        Index := Index - Large;
      kIndex := 1;
      while (kIndex < LengthPattern) and __SameChar(Index - kIndex, LengthPattern - kIndex) do
        Inc(kIndex);
      if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin


        foundAt := Index - kIndex + 1;
        Index := Index + LengthPattern;
        //fromPos := Index;
        fromPos := (foundAt+LengthPattern);
        if lastFoundAt=0 then begin
                copyStartsAt := 1;
                copyLen := foundAt-copyStartsAt;
        end else begin
                copyStartsAt := lastFoundAt+LengthPattern;
                copyLen := foundAt-copyStartsAt;
        end;

        if (copyLen<=0)or(copyStartsAt<=0) then begin
                Inc(errors);
        end;

        Result := Result + Copy(aSourceString, copyStartsAt, copyLen ) + aReplaceString;
        lastFoundAt := foundAt;
        if not (rfReplaceAll in Flags) then
                 fromPos := 0; // break out of outer while loop too!
        break;
      end else begin
        if __SameChar(Index, LengthPattern) then
          Index := Index + LastMarker
        else
          Index := Index + SkipTable[aSourceString[Index]];
      end; // if kIndex = LengthPattern then begin
    end; // while Index <= LengthString do begin
  end;
  // the part that didn't require any replacing, because nothing more was found,
  // or rfReplaceAll flag was not specified, is copied at the
  // end as the final step.
  if (lastFoundAt+LengthPattern < Limit) then begin
    copyStartsAt := lastFoundAt+LengthPattern;
    copyLen := Limit; { this number can be larger than needed to be, and it is harmless }
    Result := Result + Copy(aSourceString, copyStartsAt, copyLen );
  end;

end;

Okay, problem: Stack footprint of this:

var
  skiptable : array [Char] of Integer;  // 65536*4 bytes stack usage on Unicode delphi

Goodbye CPU hell, Hello stack hell. If I go for a dynamic array, then I have to resize it at runtime. So this thing is basically fast, because the Virtual Memory system on your computer doesn't blink at 256K going on the stack, but this is not always an optimal piece of code. Nevertheless my PC doesn't blink at big stack stuff like this. It's not going to become a Delphi standard library default or win any fastcode challenge in the future, with that kinda footprint. I think that repeated searches are a case where the above code should be written as a class, and the skiptable should be a data field in that class. Then you can build the boyer-moore table once, and over time, if the string is invariant, repeatedly use that object to do fast lookups.

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In my testing I found that the relative speed of fastcode Pos vs. BM versions depends on quite a few parameters (lengths, alphabet sizes, repetitiveness, substring location) so that it's not easy to generalise; some asm/SIMD-based implementations that are typically significantly faster than either of the above are possible, but I don't have a unicode-ready version at hand. And yes, a 100 Mb string isn't so unlikely when you're dealing with genomes. But then, at this stage people start to use different algorithms altogether. –  PhiS Jul 22 '10 at 17:42
    
Yep. But it would be nice if people could use efficient algorithms that are already well tested. Something like the above, when complete and tested, would be good to put into the JclStrings unit of the JCL library. Can you specify WHEN the fastcode Pos will be faster than a BoyerMoore algorithm? My tests are focusing on strings > 64K in length ONLY. –  Warren P Jul 22 '10 at 18:02
    
Hand-optimized assembler versions of a boyer-moore type string replace that I have here are doing AnsiString search and replace about 30% faster on very large AnsiStrings. That it's THAT close is actually great, considering how much more "memory bandwidth" a giant UnicodeString needs. –  Warren P Jul 22 '10 at 19:03
2  
I have several working SSE##-based SIMD asm brute-force search versions that beat both BM and Pos() easily for my purposes; on new CPUs, SSE4.2-based routines utilising PCMPxSTRx (which can handle 2-byte characters) are a distinct option. Maybe something for another fastcode challenge? –  PhiS Jul 22 '10 at 19:12
1  
If you started checking out Delphi's StringReplace versus the above, you'd see there is probably no question that Delphi's StringReplace needs to be nuked and replaced with something smarter. –  Warren P Jul 22 '10 at 19:45

Since I was just looking for the same: Jedi JCL has got a unicode aware search engine using Boyer-Moore in jclUnicode.pas. I have no idea how good or how fast it is yet.

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I'd be curious to know if it uses a giant stack-based table or if it consumes mostly heap memory in operation. –  Warren P Sep 15 at 15:09
    
I haven't analyzed it really, but by a cursory look I'd say it uses the heap. –  dummzeuch Sep 17 at 7:20

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