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Let's say I have this code:

class class1(object):
    def __init__(self):
        #don't worry about this 


    def parse(self, array):
        # do something with array

class class2(object):
    def __init__(self):
        #don't worry about this 


    def parse(self, array):
        # do something else with array

I want to be able to call class1's parse from class2 and vice-versa. I know with c++ this can be done quite easily by doing

class1::parse(array)

How would I do the equivalent in python?

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3  
This is what they call a "code smell". It looks like a bad design. What is the reason for wanting to do this? –  S.Lott Jul 22 '10 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want a static method:

class class1(object):
    @staticmethod
    def parse(array):
        ...

Note that in such cases you leave off the usually-required self parameter, because parse is not a function called on a particular instance of class1.

On the other hand, if you want a method which is still tied to its owner class, you can write a class method, where the first argument is actually the class object:

class class1(object):
    @classmethod
    def parse(array):
        ...
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Yes, thank you, this looks like it will work. –  Swiss Jul 22 '10 at 18:22
4  
Note that if you feel the need for staticmethods like that, it's a strong indication class1 and class2 should be modules instead of classes (or at least that the parse staticmethods should be functions instead.) –  Thomas Wouters Jul 22 '10 at 18:28
1  
@staticmethod should be avoided (and @classmethod as well if you don't need the class) in favor of making it a module-level function. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 22 '10 at 18:28
    
Thanks Thomas, I'm not familiar with modules, I'll have to look into that. –  Swiss Jul 22 '10 at 18:30
1  
@Stranger: I agree with Thomas and Ignacio that typically a module-level function is preferable to a static and class method. However, static and class methods are advantageous in that you can override them in subclasses. I've done this before when designing libraries, though not very often. –  Eli Courtwright Jul 22 '10 at 18:51

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