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I have an helper class with some static functions. All the functions in the class require a ‘heavy’ initialization function to run once (as if it were a constructor).

Is there a good practice for achieving this?

The only thing I thought of was calling an init function, and breaking its flow if it has already run once (using a static $initialized var). The problem is that I need to call it on every one of the class’s functions.

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1  
Under discussion is the Static Class Constructor RFC, which would offer an alternative approach. – bishop Feb 26 at 19:41
up vote 70 down vote accepted

Sounds like you'd be better served by a singleton rather than a bunch of static methods

class Singleton
{
  /**
   * 
   * @var Singleton
   */
  private static $instance;

  private function __construct()
  {
    // Your "heavy" initialization stuff here
  }

  public static function getInstance()
  {
    if ( is_null( self::$instance ) )
    {
      self::$instance = new self();
    }
    return self::$instance;
  }

  public function someMethod1()
  {
    // whatever
  }

  public function someMethod2()
  {
    // whatever
  }
}

And then, in usage

// As opposed to this
Singleton::someMethod1();

// You'd do this
Singleton::getInstance()->someMethod1();
share|improve this answer
2  
I want to -1 (but I won't) for private constructor and getInstance()... You're going to make it VERY hard to test effectively... At least make it protected so that you have options... – ircmaxell Jul 22 '10 at 20:31
8  
@ircmaxell - you're just talking about issues with the singleton pattern itself, really. And code posted by anybody on SO shouldn't be considered authoritative - especially simple examples that are only meant to be illustrative. Everyone's scenarios and situations are different – Peter Bailey Jul 22 '10 at 20:47
12  
20 whole lines??!?!? Jeez, doesn't the author of this answer know that lines of code are a precious resource?!? They don't grow on trees ya know! – Peter Bailey Nov 15 '12 at 17:53
6  
@PeterBailey Lines of code that don't accomplish anything but glue are a distraction and makes code less maintainable. – Ekevoo Nov 19 '12 at 3:07
9  
@ekevoo I'm not the author of the Singleton Pattern, you know. Don't kill the messenger. – Peter Bailey Nov 19 '12 at 17:01
// file Foo.php
class Foo
{
  static function init() { /* ... */ }
}

Foo::init();

This way, the initialization happens when the class file is included. You can make sure this only happens when necessary (and only once) by using autoloading.

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Thank you , thats a good solution. but my framework includes all helpers. is there a way to make it inside included file ? – user258626 Jul 22 '10 at 20:10
3  
I don't understand your question. All the above happens in the included file. – Victor Nicollet Jul 22 '10 at 20:12
1  
@VictorNicollet, this is ugly. Your code makes init a public method, and it wouldn't work if it's private. Isn't there a cleaner way like the java static class initializer? – Pacerier Aug 7 '13 at 9:28
    
@Pacerier if init() does nothing the second time it is invoked, it really doesn't matter if it is public... static function init() { if(self::$inited) return; /* ... */ } – FrancescoMM Jul 27 '15 at 14:10
    
@Pacerier the end result of any constructor or initializer that accepts arguments is ingesting out-of-scope data into the class. you've got to handle it somewhere. – Garet Claborn Aug 27 '15 at 12:50

Actually, I use a public static method __init__() on my static classes that require initialization (or at least need to execute some code). Then, in my autoloader, when it loads a class it checks is_callable($class, '__init__'). If it is, it calls that method. Quick, simple and effective...

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That would be my suggestion too. I did the same in the past but called it __initStatic(). It feels like a thing PHP needs, knowing Java. – Alexandru Pătrănescu Oct 10 '13 at 20:15
2  
For those of us using composer: I found this: packagist.org/packages/vladimmi/construct-static – iautomation Sep 30 '15 at 4:21
    
@iautomation Didn't tried it but this is worth to be placed in an own answer! It is a straightforward and modern approach. – robsch Jan 29 at 8:27

Note - the RFC proposing this is still in the draft state.


class Singleton
{
    private static function __static()
    {
        //...
    }
    //...
}

proposed for PHP 7.x (see https://wiki.php.net/rfc/static_class_constructor )

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That RFC isn't out of Draft stage. Please don't link or give examples to things that haven't been approved by a vote. It will confuse new users who don't realize this isn't usable yet – Machavity Jun 14 at 19:17

protected by Machavity Jun 14 at 19:42

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