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I have this statement:

Assume the bit value of byte x is 00101011. what is the result of x>>2?

How can I program it and can someone explain me what is doing?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Firstly, you can not shift a byte in java, you can only shift an int or a long. So the byte will undergo promotion first, e.g.

00101011 -> 00000000000000000000000000101011

or

11010100 -> 11111111111111111111111111010100

Now, x >> N means (if you view it as a string of binary digits):

  • The rightmost N bits are discarded
  • The leftmost bit is replicated as many times as necessary to pad the result to the original size (32 or 64 bits), e.g.

00000000000000000000000000101011 >> 2 -> 00000000000000000000000000001010

11111111111111111111111111010100 >> 2 -> 11111111111111111111111111110101

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When you shift right 2 bits you drop the 2 least significant bits. So:

x = 00101011

x >> 2

// now (notice the 2 new 0's on the left of the byte)
x = 00001010

This is essentially the same thing as dividing an int by 2, 2 times.

In Java

byte b = (byte) 16;
b = b >> 2;
// prints 4
System.out.println(b);
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4  
Each right shift is divide by 2, so two right shifts is divide by 4. –  Steve Kuo Jul 22 '10 at 20:00
    
@Steve, thanks, my mistake. –  jjnguy Jul 22 '10 at 20:01
    
Exactly. Or, in math speek: n >> m -> n / (2^m) –  delnan Jul 22 '10 at 20:02
    
@delnan, yup, but that looks scary. –  jjnguy Jul 22 '10 at 20:03
    
Might be a little clearer if you show the padding 0s to the left after the bitshift. –  Jonathon Faust Jul 22 '10 at 20:08

>> is the Arithmetic Right Shift operator. All of the bits in the first operand are shifted the number of places indicated by the second operand. The leftmost bits in the result are set to the same value as the leftmost bit in the original number. (This is so that negative numbers remain negative.)

Here's your specific case:

00101011
  001010 <-- Shifted twice to the right (rightmost bits dropped)
00001010 <-- Leftmost bits filled with 0s (to match leftmost bit in original number)
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Shift Operators

The binary 32 bits for 00101011 is

00000000 00000000 00000000 00101011, and the result is:

  00000000 00000000 00000000 00101011   >> 2(times)
 \\                                 \\
  00000000 00000000 00000000 00001010

Shifts the bits of 43 to left by distance 2; fills with highest(sign) bit on the left side.

Result is 00001010 with decimal value 10.

00001010
    8+2 = 10
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byte x = 51; //00101011
byte y = (byte) (x >> 2); //00001010 aka Base(10) 10
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You can't write binary literals like 00101011 in Java so you can write it in hexadecimal instead:

byte x = 0x2b;

To calculate the result of x >> 2 you can then just write exactly that and print the result.

System.out.println(x >> 2);
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whats about Byte.parseByte("00101011",2); ? –  stacker Jul 22 '10 at 20:33
    
Is this calculated at compile time or does it result in a method call at runtime? –  Mark Byers Jul 22 '10 at 20:40
2  
Java 7 should be adding binary literals, e.g.: 0b00101011 –  Alan Krueger Jul 22 '10 at 21:19
    
@Alan Kreuger: That's excellent news. :) Thanks for the info. –  Mark Byers Jul 22 '10 at 21:27
public class Shift {
 public static void main(String[] args) {
  Byte b = Byte.parseByte("00101011",2);
  System.out.println(b);
  byte val = b.byteValue();
  Byte shifted = new Byte((byte) (val >> 2));
  System.out.println(shifted);

  // often overloked  are the methods of Integer

  int i = Integer.parseInt("00101011",2);
  System.out.println( Integer.toBinaryString(i));
  i >>= 2;
  System.out.println( Integer.toBinaryString(i));
 }
}

Output:

43
10
101011
1010
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You can use e.g. this API if you would like to see bitString presentation of your numbers. Uncommons Math

Example (in jruby)

bitString = org.uncommons.maths.binary.BitString.new(java.math.BigInteger.new("12").toString(2))
bitString.setBit(1, true)
bitString.toNumber => 14

edit: Changed api link and add a little example

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The URL mentioned above is dead. Please remove/edit it to point to right web page. –  PK' Mar 6 '14 at 4:34
    
Updated link. I'm not sure if this answers that changed question anymore though .. –  Joni Mar 6 '14 at 19:49
    
You saved HTTP request with a dead URL! –  PK' Mar 7 '14 at 0:10

These examples cover the three types of shifts applied to both a positive and a negative number:

00100101010101010101001110101111 is   626348975 before << (Signed left shift)
01001010101010101010011101011110 is  1252697950 after << 1
10010101010101010100111010111100 is -1789571396 after << 2
00101010101010101001110101111000 is   715824504 after << 3

11011111000101010000010101010000 is  -552270512 before << (Signed left shift)
10111110001010100000101010100000 is -1104541024 after << 1
01111100010101000001010101000000 is  2085885248 after << 2
11111000101010000010101010000000 is  -123196800 after << 3

00100101010101010101001110101111 is   626348975 before >> (Signed right shift)
00010010101010101010100111010111 is   313174487 after >> 1
00001001010101010101010011101011 is   156587243 after >> 2
00000100101010101010101001110101 is    78293621 after >> 3

11011111000101010000010101010000 is  -552270512 before >> (Signed right shift)
11101111100010101000001010101000 is  -276135256 after >> 1
11110111110001010100000101010100 is  -138067628 after >> 2
11111011111000101010000010101010 is   -69033814 after >> 3

00100101010101010101001110101111 is   626348975 before >>> (Unsigned right shift)
00010010101010101010100111010111 is   313174487 after >>> 1
00001001010101010101010011101011 is   156587243 after >>> 2
00000100101010101010101001110101 is    78293621 after >>> 3

11011111000101010000010101010000 is  -552270512 before >>> (Unsigned right shift)
01101111100010101000001010101000 is  1871348392 after >>> 1
00110111110001010100000101010100 is   935674196 after >>> 2
00011011111000101010000010101010 is   467837098 after >>> 3
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