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Is there a way to use NSNumberFormatter to get the 'th' 'st' 'nd' 'rd' number endings?

EDIT:

Looks like it does not exist. Here's what I'm using.

+(NSString*)ordinalNumberFormat:(NSInteger)num{
    NSString *ending;

    int ones = num % 10;
    int tens = floor(num / 10);
    tens = tens % 10;
    if(tens == 1){
        ending = @"th";
    }else {
        switch (ones) {
            case 1:
                ending = @"st";
                break;
            case 2:
                ending = @"nd";
                break;
            case 3:
                ending = @"rd";
                break;
            default:
                ending = @"th";
                break;
        }
    }
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d%@", num, ending];
}

Adapted from nickf's answer here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/69262/is-there-an-easy-way-in-net-to-get-st-nd-rd-and-th-endings-for-numbers

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1  
This was really useful. I created a gist with this code as an NSString category: gist.github.com/3119444 –  dreadpirateryan Jul 16 '12 at 0:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since the question asked for a number formatter, here's a rough one I made.

//
//  OrdinalNumberFormatter.h
//

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>


@interface OrdinalNumberFormatter : NSNumberFormatter {

}

@end

and the implementation:

//
//  OrdinalNumberFormatter.m
//

#import "OrdinalNumberFormatter.h"


@implementation OrdinalNumberFormatter

- (BOOL)getObjectValue:(id *)anObject forString:(NSString *)string errorDescription:(NSString **)error {
    NSInteger integerNumber;
    NSScanner *scanner;
    BOOL isSuccessful = NO;
    NSCharacterSet *letters = [NSCharacterSet letterCharacterSet];

    scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:string];
    [scanner setCaseSensitive:NO];
    [scanner setCharactersToBeSkipped:letters];

    if ([scanner scanInteger:&integerNumber]){
        isSuccessful = YES;
        if (anObject) {
            *anObject = [NSNumber numberWithInteger:integerNumber];
        }
    } else {
        if (error) {
            *error = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Unable to create number from %@", string];
        }
    }

    return isSuccessful;
}

- (NSString *)stringForObjectValue:(id)anObject {
    if (![anObject isKindOfClass:[NSNumber class]]) {
        return nil;
    }

    NSString *strRep = [anObject stringValue];
    NSString *lastDigit = [strRep substringFromIndex:([strRep length]-1)];

    NSString *ordinal;


    if ([strRep isEqualToString:@"11"] || [strRep isEqualToString:@"12"] || [strRep isEqualToString:@"13"]) {
        ordinal = @"th";
    } else if ([lastDigit isEqualToString:@"1"]) {
        ordinal = @"st";
    } else if ([lastDigit isEqualToString:@"2"]) {
        ordinal = @"nd";
    } else if ([lastDigit isEqualToString:@"3"]) {
        ordinal = @"rd";
    } else {
        ordinal = @"th";
    }

    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@", strRep, ordinal];
}

@end

Instantiate this as an Interface Builder object and attach the Text Field's formatter outlet to it. For finer control (such as setting maximum and minimum values, you should create an instance of the formatter, set the properties as you wish and attach it to text field using it's setFormatter: method.

You can download the class from GitHub (including an example project)

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1  
@Abizem like jan pointed it this misses some of the teens however I see that it is fixed in your GitHub repo i.e. [strRepresentation hasSuffix:@"11"] –  Steve Moser Jul 16 '13 at 2:44

This does the trick in one method (for English). Thanks nickf http://stackoverflow.com/a/69284/1208690 for original code in PHP, I just adapted it to objective C:

-(NSString *) addSuffixToNumber:(int) number
{
    NSString *suffix;
    int ones = number % 10;
    int tens = (number/10) % 10;

    if (tens ==1) {
        suffix = @"th";
    } else if (ones ==1){
        suffix = @"st";
    } else if (ones ==2){
        suffix = @"nd";
    } else if (ones ==3){
        suffix = @"rd";
    } else {
        suffix = @"th";
    }

NSString *completeAsString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d%@",number,suffix];
return completeAsString;

}

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I'm not aware of this capability. However, it's possible to do this yourself. In English, the ordinal (th, st, nd, rd, etc) has a really simple pattern:

If the number ends with: => Use:

  • 0 => th
  • 1 => st
  • 2 => nd
  • 3 => rd
  • 4 => th
  • 5 => th
  • 6 => th
  • 7 => th
  • 8 => th
  • 9 => th
  • 11 => th
  • 12 => th
  • 13 => th

This will not spell out the word for you, but it will allow you to do something like: "42nd", "1,340,697th", etc.

This gets more complicated if you need it localized.

share|improve this answer
    
This misses some of the teens. I found the algorithm here: stackoverflow.com/questions/69262/… Just thought maybe the formatter could handle. –  jan Jul 22 '10 at 20:16
    
@jan good point about 11, 12, and 13. Those suffixes could easily be special-cased. –  Dave DeLong Jul 22 '10 at 20:28

Just adding another implementation as a class method. I didn't see this question posted until after I implemented this from an example in php.

+ (NSString *)buildRankString:(NSNumber *)rank
{
    NSString *suffix = nil;
    int rankInt = [rank intValue];
    int ones = rankInt % 10;
    int tens = floor(rankInt / 10);
    tens = tens % 10;
    if (tens == 1) {
        suffix = @"th";
    } else {
        switch (ones) {
            case 1 : suffix = @"st"; break;
            case 2 : suffix = @"nd"; break;
            case 3 : suffix = @"rd"; break;
            default : suffix = @"th";
        }
    }
    NSString *rankString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@", rank, suffix];
    return rankString;
}
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The following example demonstrates how to handle any number. It's in c# however it can easily converted to any language.

http://www.bytechaser.com/en/functions/b6yhfyxh78/convert-number-to-ordinal-like-1st-2nd-in-c-sharp.aspx

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This was my brute force implementation to taking a NSString* representation of the date and returning the ordinal value. I feel it's much easier to read.

NSDictionary *ordinalDates = @{
    @"1": @"1st",
    @"2": @"2nd",
    @"3": @"3rd",
    @"4": @"4th",
    @"5": @"5th",
    @"6": @"6th",
    @"7": @"7th",
    @"8": @"8th",
    @"9": @"9th",
    @"10": @"10th",
    @"11": @"11th",
    @"12": @"12th",
    @"13": @"13th",
    @"14": @"14th",
    @"15": @"15th",
    @"16": @"16th",
    @"17": @"17th",
    @"18": @"18th",
    @"19": @"19th",
    @"20": @"20th",
    @"21": @"21st",
    @"22": @"22nd",
    @"23": @"23rd",
    @"24": @"24th",
    @"25": @"25th",
    @"26": @"26th",
    @"27": @"27th",
    @"28": @"28th",
    @"29": @"29th",
    @"30": @"30th",
    @"31": @"31st" };
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It's quite simple in English. Here's a swift extension:

extension Int {
    var ordinal: String {
        get {
            var suffix = "th"
            switch self % 10 {
                case 0:
                    suffix = "st"
                case 1:
                    suffix = "nd"
                case 2:
                    suffix = "rd"
                default: ()
            }
            return String(self) + suffix
        }
    }
}

Then call something like:

    cell.label_position.text = (path.row + 1).ordinal
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Here's a Swift solution that cycles through the user's preferred languages until it finds one with known rules (which are pretty easy to add) for ordinal numbers:

extension Int {
    var localizedOrdinal: String {

        func ordinalSuffix(int: Int) -> String {
            for language in NSLocale.preferredLanguages() as [String] {
                switch language {
                case let l where l.hasPrefix("it"):
                    return "°"
                case let l where l.hasPrefix("en"):
                    switch int {
                    case let x where x != 11 && x % 10 == 1:
                        return "st"
                    case let x where x != 12 && x % 10 == 2:
                        return "nd"
                    case let x where x != 13 && x % 10 == 3:
                        return "rd"
                    default:
                        return "st"
                    }
                default:
                    break
                }
            }
            return ""
        }

        return "\(self)" + ordinalSuffix(self)
    }
}
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