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Suppose you have a simple function, which can get quite expensive for large values:

fact(0) -> 1;
fact(N) -> N * fact(N - 1).

Where can I find a simple example of caching (or memoizing) function values by using dets?

Any other way for easy memoization would be highly appreciated.

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Memoization is not a typo. See - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memoization –  Yuval Adam Jul 22 '10 at 22:20
    
lol. Sorry about that :D You always learn something new :p –  Roberto Aloi Jul 22 '10 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The idea is that every time you ask for your heavy calculation, you immediately check in the cache if you've already evaluated it. If yes, you simply return the stored value. If not, you have to evaluate the new value and to store it, before returning it to the final user.

A dict, rather than a dets table, could also work.

(The following solution is untested)

-module(cache_fact).

-export([init/0, fact/1]).

init() ->
    {ok, _} = dets:open_file(values, []).

fact(N) ->
    case dets:lookup(values, N) of
      [] ->
        Result = do_fact(N), 
        dets:insert_new(values, {N, Result}),
        Result;
      [{N, Cached}] ->
        Cached
    end.

do_fact(0) ->
    1;
do_fact(N) ->
    N * do_fact(N-1).

You might want to encapsulate the whole thing into an Erlang generic server. In the init function you should create the DETS table, the fact/1 function should represent your API and you should implement the logic in the handle_call functions.

A nicer example could be writing a shortener service for URLs, cached.

As suggested by @Zed, it would make sense to store the partial results as well to avoid further re-calculations. If this is the case:

-module(cache_fact).

-export([init/0, fact/1]).

init() ->
    {ok, _} = dets:open_file(values, []).

fact(0) ->
    1;
fact(N) ->
    case dets:lookup(values, N) of
      [] ->
        Result = N * fact(N-1),
        dets:insert_new(values, {N, Result}),
        Result;
      [{N, Cached}] ->
        Cached
    end.

Obviously, even if this helps for large numbers, you have to consider the additional cost of adding an entry to the lookup table for every step. Considering the reasons why the caching has been introduced (we assume the calculation is very heavy, so the lookup insertion time is insignificant), this should be perfectly fine.

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1  
The point of the example would be that if you have 12! memoized, you calculate 13! by multiplying that value by 13. However your code will calculate 13! from start, no matter what is memoized. –  Zed Jul 23 '10 at 6:17
    
I'm aware of it. I guess the choice there is to store all partial values or just the final value. I'm completely new to "memoization". The example simply wanted to display the "caching" using dets. –  Roberto Aloi Jul 23 '10 at 6:45
    
Even if you store just final values, those will be partial results for your next calculations. I just wanted to point out that you should check for cached values in your do_fact function as well. –  Zed Jul 23 '10 at 18:45
    
Instead of the dets or dict module, you could also use the ets module: erlang.org/doc/man/ets.html –  tsauerwein Jun 12 '12 at 8:56

Depending on your case, you can also use the process dictionary for memoization:

fact(0) -> 1;
fact(N) ->
    case erlang:get({'fact', N}) of
        F when is_integer(F) ->
            F;
        'undefined' ->
            F = N * fact(N-1),
            erlang:put({'fact', N}, F),
            F
    end.
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I like this solution, simple and to the point. –  Yuval Adam Jul 23 '10 at 7:27

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