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boost::tuple has a get() member function used like this:

tuple<int, string, string> t(5, "foo", "bar");
cout << t.get<1>();  // outputs "foo"

It seems the C++0x std::tuple does not have this member function, and you have to instead use the non-member function form:

std::get<1>(t);

which to me looks uglier.

Is there any particular reason why std::tuple doesn't have the member function? Or is it just my implementation (gcc 4.4)?

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7  
As a design rule of thumb, non-member functions are to be preferred anyway. –  GManNickG Jul 22 '10 at 23:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 43 down vote accepted

From C++0x draft:

[ Note: The reason get is a nonmember function is that if this functionality had been provided as a member function, code where the type depended on a template parameter would have required using the template keyword. — end note ]

This can be illustrated with this code:

template <typename T>
struct test
{
  T value;
  template <int ignored>
  T&  member_get ()
  {  return value;  }
};

template <int ignored, typename T>
T&  free_get (test <T>& x)
{  return x.value;  }

template <typename T>
void
bar ()
{
  test <T>  x;
  x.template member_get <0> ();  // template is required here
  free_get <0> (x);
};
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14  
I see. Still, they could have provided both member and non-member functions like boost, if for no other reason that to be compatible with boost (since a lot of people are likely to have already been using boost tuples before switching to C++0x). –  HighCommander4 Jul 22 '10 at 21:40
1  
@HighCommander4 Whereas I understand your argument, boost compatibility alone is not a sufficient reason on its own, since compatibility to existing solutions shouldn't be the only driving force for providing something in a new standard and even boost is not the non-plus-ultra and may profit from some revision. Those general words being said, I still agree that member-gets would have been a good idea. –  Christian Rau Oct 16 '12 at 8:13

The existing answers are great and certainly for the standards committee were vital for this purpose. But there is another issue that I think is important enough to mention.

With free functions, you have the ability to modify an interface without changing the definition of a class. You can make any type "gettable" simply by specializing the global get. With a member function, you would have to directly modify the class.

This is one of the reasons why range-based for is built on std::begin/std::end instead of looking for member functions. std::begin/end are specialized for array types, so you can use range-based for with arrays. You can use it with any container, even those that don't have begin/end functions. You can specialize it for, for example, LibXML2 element types, such that you can range-based for over xmlElement*'s.

You can't do that if they had to be member functions.

In C++, free functions are a natural interface for many operations that could be done on many different kinds of classes.

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That's a very good point, +1. –  HighCommander4 Oct 16 '12 at 16:26
    
std::begin/std::end are also good examples of how member and non-member functions can work together nicely. You can use either with most containers. –  jakar May 13 at 17:50

N3090/3092, §20.4.2.6/8: "Note: The reason get is a nonmember function is that if this functionality had been provided as a member function, code where the type depended on a template parameter would have required using the template keyword. —end note"

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