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Question 1

I used to use that line for my PHP parser file for a game server, but it does not work anymore. I know there is the fopen("php://stdin") thing but that's now 3 lines of code instead of just one, why would PHP do this?

Question 2

Also, when I use that method I keep getting this output which is causing my script to not read the commands the parser outputs, how can I stop it?

X-Powered-By: PHP/5.2.12
Content-type: text/html

I tried setting Content-Type to text/plain and it didn't do anything...
Here's the base code:

#!/usr/bin/php
<?php

while (1):
    $line = rtrim(fgets(STDIN, 1024));
    $line = explode(" ", $line);
    switch ($line[0]):
        // NEW_ROUND <date> <time>
        // PLAYER_ENTERED <nice_name> <ip> <real_name>
        case "PLAYER_ENTERED":
            print "PLAYER_MESSAGE {$line[1]} WELCOME TO TRONNERS!\n";
            break;
        // PLAYER_LEFT <nice_name> <ip>
        // RACE_DONE
        case "RACE_DONE":
            print "CONSOLE_MESSAGE RACING TIMEKEEPER COMING SOON!\n";
            break;
        // ROUND_COMMENCING <round> <max_rounds>
        case "ROUND_COMMENCING":
            print "CENTER_MESSAGE What's the name of this map?\n";
            break;
    endswitch;
endwhile;

?>

I'm using a tail to keep lines being posted to a file going into the PHP parser and then the output from the parsed is being sent to another commands file via tee.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are using the *-cgi binary from the command line, which I wouldn't recommend. Use the CLI one if available. See where the symbolic link in /usr/bin/php actually goes.

edit: aha, here it is in the manual, only valid for CLI:

http://www.php.net/manual/en/features.commandline.io-streams.php

$ echo  '<?php echo fread(STDIN,123); ?>' > r.php
$ echo 'bla' | php5-cgi -q -d html_errors=off r.php 
Warning: fread() expects parameter 1 to be resource, string given in /tmp/r.php on line 1
Call Stack:
    0.0002     330080   1. {main}() /tmp/r.php:0
    0.0002     330260   2. fread() /tmp/r.php:1

$ echo 'bla' | php r.php 
bla

Under debian it could likely be fixed by the following (don't know about other *nix flavors):

update-alternatives --config php

For building from source the manual explains what happens: http://nl.php.net/manual/en/features.commandline.introduction.php

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It's not a symbolic link, it's an executable file. I found another one at /usr/local/bin/php, should I be using that one instead? –  animuson Jul 22 '10 at 21:55
    
If /usr/local/bin/php -v says it's CLI instead of CGI, yes, otherwise, try to find something like php-cli or php5-cli with the package manager of your distribution. –  Wrikken Jul 22 '10 at 22:07

Question 2 was answered by Ehsan so ill have a go at Question 1.

Just had a look at the Changlog for Fgets and theres been no changes since 4.2, so im not sure how you managed to read a stream without opening a handle before hand.

Version  Description
4.3.0      fgets() is now binary safe
4.2.0      The length parameter became optional

anyways it seems like you want to read the stream with one line, have your tried the following.

file("php://stdin");
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