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Given two bytes, how would I find the length of the common bits at the start of the two bytes.

For example:

9 == 00001001
6 == 00000110

Common prefix is 0000, length 4

I'm working in C#, so please stick to C# operations only.

Addendum: This particular piece of code will run thousands of times and needs to be very fast.

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1  
A table lookup will probably be the absolute fastest approach. –  mquander Jul 22 '10 at 22:21
    
Thousands of times?! That's not much at all. Probably you should concentrate on readability rather than performance until you have profiled and found the readable solution to be too slow. –  Mark Byers Jul 22 '10 at 22:31
    
It was a turn of phrase, in practice it runs many thousands of times every time I do something which is speed critical. I know that a variant of this particular method has been too slow in the past, hence why I'm looking for a better way –  Martin Jul 22 '10 at 22:43
    
Out of interest, what do you use need to do this for? –  Ash Jul 23 '10 at 0:24
    
Nodes in a Kademlia network have unique identifiers, the distance metric for the network is the length of similar prefix. I'm implementing such a network for my comp-sci final year project en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kademlia –  Martin Jul 23 '10 at 20:54

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

EDIT: Thanks to the comments, I found that I misunderstanded the problem. (Below is a fixed version).

With a lookup table:

readonly static int[] bytePrefix = new int[] {
    8, 7, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,
    3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
    1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
    1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
    1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
    1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
};

And use it XORing the two bytes:

bytePrefix[9 ^ 6]

I believe this is as fast as it can get, it's just one XOR operation and an array lookup (you can also change it to 2 array lookups, but it would use 256 times more memory and probably be slower, bitwise it really fast).

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x = 1111 0000, y = 1111 0000. Won't this return 0 if the two bytes are equal? –  IVlad Jul 22 '10 at 22:30
    
@IVIad: No. ORing those 2 values results in 0b11110000, and the common prefix of this is 0 as you can see in the lookup table. –  GameZelda Jul 22 '10 at 22:33
    
@GameZelda - I'm pretty sure the common prefix for 1111 0000 and 1111 0000 has length 8. Your program returns 0. 0 is wrong. –  IVlad Jul 22 '10 at 22:39
    
I'm pretty sure the operation you want here is XOR, not OR. 11110000 and 11110000 has a common prefix of 8... XOR will cause zeroes in the positions they have in common, and works with the table you provided. –  jdmichal Jul 22 '10 at 22:44
    
Damnit, you're right. looks like I did understand the problem wrong. Going to fix my post now. –  GameZelda Jul 22 '10 at 22:49
byte x = 9;
byte y = 6;

while ( x != y )
{
    x >>= 1;
    y >>= 1;
}

Basically, remove a bit from the right of each number until the two are equal. When they become equal, their bits are equal too.

You can keep track of the length of the prefix easily by introducing another variable. I'll leave that to you.

If you want it to be fast, and considering that you're dealing with bytes, why not precompute the values and return the answer in a single operation? Run this algorithm for all possible combinations of two bytes and store the result in a table.

You only have 2^8 * 2^8 = 2^16 possibilities (2^15 actually, because x = 6 and y = 9 is the same as x = 9 and y = 6). If you can afford the initial time and memory, precomputation should be fastest in the end.

Edit:

You got a solution that's at least better for precomputation and probably faster in general: find the leftmost 1 bit in x ^ y. Using this, build a table Pre where Pre[i] = position of leftmost 1 bit in i. You only need 2^8 bytes for this table.

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1  
I find this approach the most readable. –  mquander Jul 22 '10 at 22:19
1  
This loop may never terminate. –  Mike Daniels Jul 22 '10 at 22:19
1  
@IVlad, @mquander: Oh right. Unsigned bytes. This is what Java does to your brain. ;P –  Mike Daniels Jul 22 '10 at 22:24
1  
You also only have 2^15 possibilities, since the operation is symmetrical. Just swap if the first argument is bigger or something similar. –  jdmichal Jul 22 '10 at 22:26
1  
@GameZelda - you can indeed do it with 2^8 entries, but definitely not as you explained. You can do it with a xor table. –  IVlad Jul 22 '10 at 22:46

First get the binary difference between the bytes using the xor operator. Then you just shift bits out to the right until the difference is zero:

byte b1 = 6;
byte b2 = 9;

int length = 8;
for (int diff = b1 ^ b2; diff != 0; length--) diff >>= 1;

This will give you a minimum of calculations in the loop, so it will be rather fast.

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+1, Looks almost perfect. –  arbiter Jul 22 '10 at 22:53

If you're in a space-limited environment (which obviously you're not if you're using C#, but just in general) and can't afford a lookup table:

byte test = byte1 ^ byte2;
int length = 0;
if ((test & 0x80) == 0)
{
    if ((test & 0x40) == 0)
    {
        if ((test & 0x20) == 0)
        {
            if ((test & 0x10) == 0)
            {
                // I think you get the idea by now.
                // Repeat for the lower nibble.
            }
            else
                length = 3;
        }
        else
            length = 2;
    }
    else
        length = 1;
}

This is basically an unraveled loop to find the first 1 bit in the XOR'd number. I don't think it can get any faster than this without the lookup table.

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Upvote for the space limited solution, which isn't what I need but it's interesting nonetheless –  Martin Jul 23 '10 at 20:56

This can be restated as a simpler problem with a known fast solution:

  • Find the left-most true bit in X ^ Y.

Some code (apparently code can't immediately follow a bulleted list?!?)

 int findCommonPrefix(long x, long y, out long common)
 {
    int prefixPlace = 0;
    int testPlace = 32;
    long w, mismatch = x ^ y;
    do {
       w = mismatch >> testPlace;
       if (w != 0) { prefixPlace |= testPlace; mismatch = w; }
       testPlace >>= 1;
    } while (testPlace != 0);
    common = x >> prefixPlace;
    return 64 - prefixPlace;
 }

This needs only 6 iterations to find the common prefix in a 64-bit long, the byte version will need only 3 iterations. Unroll the loop for even more speed.

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Another approach using exclusive or (xor):

public int GetCommonPrefixLength(byte a, byte b)
{
    int c = a ^ b;
    int len = -1;
    while ((++len < 8) && ((c & 0x80) == 0))
        c = c << 1;
    return len;
}
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Doesn't seem to work if I have understand the problem correctly. For example, a = 255 and b = 255 (both 0b11111111, so common prefix = 0), returns 8. –  GameZelda Jul 22 '10 at 22:41
    
@GameZelda - just out of curiosity, can you tell me what you think a common prefix is? –  IVlad Jul 22 '10 at 22:45
    
If a == 255 and b == 255 then common prefix will be 255 (length 8) because a and b equals. Read question carefully author needs common prefix, not zeroed common prefix. –  arbiter Jul 22 '10 at 22:46

Here's a procedural way:

int r = 8;
while (a != b)
{
    a >>= 1;
    b >>= 1;
    r -= 1;
}

Here's a way that uses a lookup table with just 256 entries:

int[] lookupTable;

void createLookupTable()
{
    lookupTable = new int[256];
    for (int a = 0; a <= 255; ++a)
    {
        int n = 8;
        byte b = (byte)a;
        while (b > 0) {
            b >>= 1;
            n -= 1;
        }
        lookupTable[a] = n;
    }
}

int commonPrefix(byte a, byte b)
{
    return lookupTable[a ^ b];
}

And just for fun here's a way to do it with LINQ:

int r = 8 - Enumerable.Range(0, 9).Where(n => a >> n == b >> n).First();
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Points for the LINQ implementation, we all love LINQ :D –  Martin Jul 22 '10 at 22:29
int i;
for (i=0;i<sizeof(byte);i++)
    if (a >> sizeof(byte)-i != b >> sizeof(byte)-i) break;
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The 256-byte table versions seem quite nice; depending upon caching and branching issues, a 16-byte table version might or might not run faster. Something like:

/* Assumes table[16] is defined similarly to the table[256] in earlier examples */
unsigned int find_mismatch(unsigned char a, unsigned char b)
{
  unsigned char mismatch;
  mismatch = a^b;
  if (mismatch & 0xF0)
    return table[mismatch >> 4];
  else
    return table[mismatch]+4;
}

More instructions, including a branch, but since the table is now only 16 bytes it would take only one or two cache misses to fill entirely. Another approach, using a total of three lookups on a 16-byte table and a five-byte table, but no branching:

unsigned char table2[5] = {0,0,0,0,0xFF};

unsigned int find_mismatch(unsigned char a, unsigned char b)
{
  unsigned char mismatch,temp2;
  mismatch = a^b;
  temp2 = table[mismatch >> 4];
  return temp2 + (table2[temp2] & table[mismatch & 15]);
}

One would have to do some profiling in the real application to see whether the reduced cache load of the smaller tables was sufficient to offset the extra instructions.

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Here's one without a table or a loop:

len =  (a^b) ? (7 - (int)Math.Log( a^b, 2)) : 8;

Explanation:

log2 X is the power to which the number 2 must be raised to obtain the value X. Since each bit in a binary number represents the next power of 2, you can use this fact to find the highest bit set (counting from 0):

2**0   = 1 = 0b0001;  log2(1) = 0
2**1   = 2 = 0b0010;  log2(2) = 1
2**1.6 =~3 = 0b0011;  log2(3) =~1.6; (int)log2(3) = 1
2**2   = 4 = 0b0100;  log2(4) = 2
...
2**3   = 8 = 0b1000;  log2(8) = 3

So the code works by taking a XOR b, which sets only the bits which are different. If the result is non-zero, we use log2 to find the highest bit set. 7 less the result gives the number of leading zeros = the number of common bits. There is a special case when a XOR b == 0: log2(0) is -Infinity, so that won't work, but we know that all the bits must match, so the answer is 8.

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Wow, how does that work? –  Martin Jul 23 '10 at 20:59
    
added explanation –  AShelly Jul 26 '10 at 18:59
    
Math.log is almost certainly way slower than a simple loop or lookup table. –  Antimony Oct 20 '12 at 19:21

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