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I need to set the height of every textbox on my form, some of which are nested within other controls. I thought I could do something like this:

private static IEnumerator<TextBox> FindTextBoxes(Control rootControl)
{
    foreach (Control control in rootControl.Controls)
    {
        if (control.Controls.Count > 0)
        {
            // Recursively search for any TextBoxes within each child control
            foreach (TextBox textBox in FindTextBoxes(control))
            {
                yield return textBox;
            }
        }

        TextBox textBox2 = control as TextBox;
        if (textBox2 != null)
        {
            yield return textBox2;
        }
    }
}

Using it like this:

foreach(TextBox textBox in FindTextBoxes(this))
{
    textBox.Height = height;
}

But of course the compiler spits its dummy, because foreach expects an IEnumerable rather than an IEnumerator.

Is there a way to do this without having to create a separate class with a GetEnumerator() method?

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2  
Actually, foreach doesn’t expect an IEnumerable at all (nor an IEnumerable<T>). It only expects something that has a GetEnumerator method. That method, in turn, need not necessarily return an IEnumerator or IEnumerator<T> — it only needs to return something that has a MoveNext() method and a Current property. –  Timwi Sep 1 '10 at 14:22
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As the compiler is telling you, you need to change your return type to IEnumerable. That is how the yield return syntax works.

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5  
yield return can be used with methods that return either IEnumerable<T> or IEnumerator<T>. It’s only in the foreach loop where IEnumerator<T> can’t be used. –  Timwi Sep 1 '10 at 14:20
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Just to clarify

private static IEnumerator<TextBox> FindTextBoxes(Control rootControl)

Changes to

private static IEnumerable<TextBox> FindTextBoxes(Control rootControl)

That should be all :-)

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If you return IEnumerator, it will be a different enumerator object each time call that method (acting as though you reset the enumerator on each iteration). If you return IEnumerable then a foreach can enumerate based on the method with the yield statement.

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// Generic function that gets all child controls of a certain type, 
// returned in a List collection
private static List<T> GetChildTextBoxes<T>(Control ctrl) where T : Control {
List<T> tbs = new List<T>();
foreach (Control c in ctrl.Controls) {
// If c is of type T, add it to the collection
if (c is T) {
tbs.Add((T)c);
}
}
return tbs;
}

private static void SetChildTextBoxesHeight(Control ctrl, int height) {
foreach (TextBox t in GetChildTextBoxes<TextBox>(ctrl)) {
t.Height = height;
}
}
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If you are given an enumerator, and need to use it in a for-each loop, you could use the following to wrap it:

    static public class enumerationHelper
    {
        public class enumeratorHolder<T>
        {
            private T theEnumerator;
            public T GetEnumerator() { return theEnumerator; }
            public enumeratorHolder(T newEnumerator) { theEnumerator = newEnumerator;}
        }
        static enumeratorHolder<T> toEnumerable<T>(T theEnumerator) { return new enumeratorHolder<T>(theEnumerator); }
        private class IEnumeratorHolder<T>:IEnumerable<T>
        {
            private IEnumerator<T> theEnumerator;
            public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() { return theEnumerator; }
            System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return theEnumerator; }
            public IEnumeratorHolder(IEnumerator<T> newEnumerator) { theEnumerator = newEnumerator; }
        }
        static IEnumerable<T> toEnumerable<T>(IEnumerator<T> theEnumerator) { return new IEnumeratorHolder<T>(theEnumerator); }
    }

The toEnumerable method will aceept anything that c# or vb would regard an acceptable return type from GetEnumerator, and return something that can be used in foreach. If the parameter is an IEnumerator<T> the response will be an IEnumerable<T>, though calling GetEnumerator on it once will likely yield bad results.

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