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#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open(my $vmstat, "/usr/bin/vmstat 1 2>&1 |");
open(my $foo, ">", "foo.txt") or die "can't open it for write";

while(<$vmstat>) {
   print "get ouput from vmstat and print it to foo.txt ...\n";
   print $foo $_;
}

when I run the above code, nothing wrong happend.but after I press ctr-c to quit, nothing in the foo.txt. could any of you tells me why does this happen? thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Have you verified that you get the "get output..." text to console? If $vmstat never gives data it could be the cause. Your shebang is also wrong (shouldn't have a space after the #!) –  Daenyth Jul 23 '10 at 4:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe the output is being buffered and you are not being patient enough. Try this extra line of code:

open(my $foo, ">foo.txt") or die "can't open it for write";
select $foo; $| = 1; select STDOUT;
share|improve this answer
    
better: use IO::File (); open …; $foo->autoflush(1); –  daxim Jul 23 '10 at 6:46

There are a couple of issues with this line:

opne(my $foo, ">" "foo.txt") or die "can't open it for write";

First of all, open is misspelled. Also, you have two strings next to each other, with nothing separating them. Try this:

open(my $foo, ">foo.txt") or die "can't open it for write";

Also, if that doesn't fix your problem, double check that you (or the user this runs as) has write access to the file foo.txt.

share|improve this answer
    
@pkeaeding: thanks for indicate me the edit error I've made. but it's definitely not the solution for the problem and I do can write the file ... –  Haiyuan Zhang Jul 23 '10 at 2:48

You have a typo: "opne" instead of "open".

Also, to read from processes, you must put a pipe at the end:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open(my $vmstat, "/usr/bin/vmstat 1 5 2>&1 |") or die "error";
open(my $foo, ">foo.txt") or die "can't open it for write";

while(<$vmstat>) {
    print "get ouput from vmstat and print it to foo.txt ...\n";
    print $foo $_;
}
share|improve this answer
    
first of all, thanks again tells me the typo I've made, anyway I've fix the two you've mentioned. then, the reason why I downgrade your answer is that instead of while(), while(<$vmstat>) should be used ... –  Haiyuan Zhang Jul 23 '10 at 3:00
    
don't know why the negative vote, since my code works. :) In any case, by opening processes with a pipe at the beginning you can write to them. And with a pipe at the end you can read from them. –  sespindola Jul 23 '10 at 3:02
    
You're right. I used the less then and greater than signs instead of using their respective html entities. That's why the file descriptor inside wasn't visible. Never mind the vote, glad I could help. –  sespindola Jul 23 '10 at 3:09
1  
@Haiyuan: you can retract your vote now that sespindola has edited it. @sespindola: please format your code correctly in future; HTML entities are not parsed inside code blocks. (Indent by four characters, or highlight the area and click the binary icon.) There is rarely a need to use HTML anywhere in a post; please see the guide: stackoverflow.com/editing-help –  Ether Jul 23 '10 at 4:09

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