Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In Python, I want to have a class attribute, a dictionary, with initialized values. I wrote this code:

class MetaDataElement:
    (MD_INVALID, MD_CATEGORY, MD_TAG) = range(3)
    mapInitiator2Type = {'!':MetaDataElement.MD_CATEGORY, 
                         '#':MetaDataElement.MD_TAG}

But when I try to run this code, I get an error message with "NameError: name 'MetaDataElement' is not defined". Could you help me?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot refer to MetaDataElement while it is being constructed, since it does not yet exist. Thus,

class MetaDataElement:
    (MD_INVALID, MD_CATEGORY, MD_TAG) = range(3)
    mapInitiator2Type = {'!':MetaDataElement.MD_CATEGORY, 
                         '#':MetaDataElement.MD_TAG}

fails because the very construction of mapInitiator2Type requires MetaDataElement to have attributes, which it does not yet have. You can think of your constants MD_INVALID, etc. as variables that are local to the construction of your class. This is why the following works, as icktoofay wrote:

class MetaDataElement:
    (MD_INVALID, MD_CATEGORY, MD_TAG) = range(3)
    mapInitiator2Type = {'!': MD_CATEGORY,  # MD_CATEGORY is like a local variable!
                         '#': MD_TAG}

However, you can refer to the class MetaDataElement in any yet un-interpreted piece of code, as in

    def method_of_MetaDataElement(self):
        print MetaDataElement.MD_TAG

You even have to refer to MetaDataElement, here, because MD_TAG is not a kind of local variable when method_of_MetaDataElement() is executed (MD_TAG was only defined as a kind of local variable during class construction). Once the class MetaDataElement is created, MD_TAG is simply a class attribute, which is why method_of_MetaDataElement() must refer to it as such.

share|improve this answer
    
The final example could be written with self.MD_TAG, which avoids any need to refer to the class name. – Marcin Jul 13 '12 at 3:43
    
@Marcin: self.MD_TAG is also a possibility, but it is not equivalent to MetaDataElement.MD_TAG, if MetaDataElement is subclassed (subclasses might overwrite MD_TAG). Both are valid, but which one to choose depends on the situation at hand. – EOL Jul 13 '12 at 7:48
    
Honestly, I think it's probably wrong for methods to prevent subclasses from being able to usefully alter class members, which is why I would recommend using self unless there is a specific reason to prevent it. – Marcin Jul 13 '12 at 13:14

First of all, you're using old-style classes. You should probably use new-style classes, like so:

class MetaDataElement(object):
    ...

Note the (object). Anyway, though, simply remove the MetaDataElement. when referring to the class attributes. This is what it'd look like when that's done:

class MetaDataElement(object):
    (MD_INVALID, MD_CATEGORY, MD_TAG) = range(3)
    mapInitiator2Type = {'!': MD_CATEGORY, 
                         '#': MD_TAG}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe redism is writing in Python 3 and is using new-style classes. :) – EOL Jul 23 '10 at 6:40
    
@EOL: I wasn't aware that Python 3 used new-style classes by default. That's good to know. – icktoofay Jul 24 '10 at 2:23
    
Here is the reference: "Classic classes are gone." (docs.python.org/release/3.0.1/whatsnew/3.0.html#removed-syntax) – EOL Jul 24 '10 at 10:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.