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Say I have a numpy matrix like so:

[[ x1, x2, x3, ... ],
 [ y1, y2, y3, ... ],
 [ z1, z2, z3, ... ],
 [ 1,  1,  1,  ... ]]

From which I want to extract a list of lists like so:

[[x1, y1, z1], [x2, y2, z2], [x3, y3, z3], ... ]

What is the most optimal way of doing this?

At the moment I have:

tpoints = [pt[:3].tolist() for pt in numpy.asarray(tptmat.T)]

And the call to tolist() is taking up disproportionate amount of time, approximately a third of the time spent in the most time consuming function of my program.

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
 14422540   69.777    0.000   69.777    0.000 {method 'tolist' of 'numpy.ndarray' objects}
       20   64.258    3.213  178.057    8.903 trans.py:152(_apply)
      ...
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not remove the last row before the transpose?

m[:3].T.tolist()
#      ^^^^^^^^^ optional

Micro-benchmark shows this method is faster than yours by 61%, and if you don't convert it into a list of list it is 45 times faster, for a 100×4 matrix.

$ python2.5 -m timeit -s 'import numpy; m = numpy.matrix([[5]*100,[6]*100,[7]*100,[1]*100])' 'm[:3].T'
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.26 usec per loop
$ python2.5 -m timeit -s 'import numpy; m = numpy.matrix([[5]*100,[6]*100,[7]*100,[1]*100])' 'm[:3].T.tolist()'
10000 loops, best of 3: 180 usec per loop
$ python2.5 -m timeit -s 'import numpy; m = numpy.matrix([[5]*100,[6]*100,[7]*100,[1]*100])' 'numpy.asarray(m[:3].T)'
100000 loops, best of 3: 10.9 usec per loop
$ python2.5 -m timeit -s 'import numpy; m = numpy.matrix([[5]*100,[6]*100,[7]*100,[1]*100])' '[p[:3].tolist()for p in numpy.asarray(m.T)]'
1000 loops, best of 3: 289 usec per loop
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+1 for being smarter! –  Daren Thomas Jul 23 '10 at 7:11
    
Perfect! And it looks even better as well. I had a feeling I was over complicating things. –  Adam C. Jul 23 '10 at 8:35
    
Also, yes tolist() is necessary in this case unfortunately. Code which I have no control over chokes if I pass it a numpy array. –  Adam C. Jul 24 '10 at 12:23
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Have you tried zip(*matrix)? This will leave you with

[[x1, y1, z1, 1], [x2, y2, z2, 1], [x3, y3, z3, 1], ... ]

But list generation will probably still happen...

Wait (slaps palm on forehead)! This should do the trick:

zip(*matrix[:3])

In the interactive shell:

>>> matrix = [[ 11, 12, 13, 14],
...           [ 21, 22, 23, 24],
...           [ 31, 32, 33, 34],
...           [  1,  1,  1,  1]]
>>> zip(*matrix[:3])
[(11, 21, 31), (12, 22, 32), (13, 23, 33), (14, 24, 34)]
>>>

This is a list of tuples, though, but does that really matter?

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