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For support reasons I want to be able for a user to take a screenshot of the current browser window as easy as possible and send it over to the server.

Any (crazy) ideas?

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You could possibly capture the viewport in which the page resides, but I really doubt you could capture the whole window. That would be a security risk wouldn't it. –  Keyo Jul 23 '10 at 7:43
2  
There are drop in solutions for this in 2013. Usersnap can be installed as easy as Google analytics and you will get accurate screenshots from your visitors (they don't have to install anything. No Java, no Flash, no ActiveX, no whatsoever). –  Gregor Jun 19 '13 at 15:58

15 Answers 15

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That would appear to be a pretty big security hole in JavaScript if you could do this. Imagine a malicious user installing that code on your site with a XSS attack and then screenshotting all of your daily work. Imagine that happening with your online banking...

However, it is possible to do this sort of thing outside of JavaScript. I developed a Swing application that used screen capture code like this which did a great job of sending an email to the helpdesk with an attached screenshot whenever the user encountered a RuntimeException.

I suppose you could experiment with a signed Java applet (shock! horror! noooooo!) that hung around in the corner. If executed with the appropriate security privileges given at installation it might be coerced into executing that kind of screenshot code.

For convenience, here is the code from the site I linked to:

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Rectangle;
import java.awt.Robot;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import java.io.File;

...

public void captureScreen(String fileName) throws Exception {

   Dimension screenSize = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize();
   Rectangle screenRectangle = new Rectangle(screenSize);
   Robot robot = new Robot();
   BufferedImage image = robot.createScreenCapture(screenRectangle);
   ImageIO.write(image, "png", new File(fileName));
}
...
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1  
That security point doesn't make a whole lot of sense since you can just monitor all the keypresses and their targets in JavaScript. –  Brewer Gorge Oct 13 '13 at 21:16
    
Think about entering a password using a series of dropdowns. Monitoring a keyboard won't help, but a series of screenshots will. –  Gary Rowe Oct 14 '13 at 13:02
    
Then you could monitor form changes. Unless we are talking flash, there isn't really much that couldn't be monitored by JS. –  Brewer Gorge Oct 14 '13 at 18:50
    
If you can inject arbitary JS in the client browser - and you are a bit skilled - you can do almost everything. That argument justifies nothing about this being crazy or not.. –  Áxel Costas Pena Nov 25 '13 at 14:50

You could try to render the whole page in canvas and save this image back to server. have fun :)

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This can be done, but not directly from the web page. You can do it from a Firefox extension (and, presumably an extension in various other browsers as well, though I don't know). See my answer. –  MatrixFrog Jul 23 '10 at 8:25
2  

I've seen people either do this with two approaches:

  1. setup a separate server for screenshotting and run a bunch of firefox instances on there, check out these two gem if you're doing it in ruby: selenium-webdriver and headless

  2. use a hosted solution like http://url2png.com (way easier)

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A webpage can't do this (or at least, I would be very surprised if it could, in any browser) but a Firefox extension can. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Drawing_Graphics_with_Canvas#Rendering_Web_Content_Into_A_Canvas -- when that page says "Chrome privileges" that means an extension can do it, but a web page can't.

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Seems to me that support needs (at least) the answers for two questions:

  1. What does the screen look like? and
  2. Why does it look that way?

A screenshot -- a visual -- is very necessary and answers the first question, but it can't answer the second.

As a first attempt, I'd try to send the entire page up to support. The support tech could display that page in his browser (answers the first question); and could also see the current state of the customer's html (helps to answer the second question).

I'd try to send as much of the page as is available to the client JS by way of AJAX or as the payload of a form. I'd also send info not on the page: anything that affects the state of the page, like cookies or session IDs or whatever.

The cust might have a submit-like button to start the process.

I think that would work. Let's see: it needs some CGI somewhere on the server that catches the incoming user page and makes it available to support, maybe by writing a disk file. Then the support person can load (or have loaded automatically) that same page. All the other info (cookies and so on) can be put into the page that support sees.

PLUS: the client JS that handles the submit-button onclick( ) could also include any useful JS variable values!

Hey, this can work! I'm getting psyched :-)

HTH

-- pete

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Print Screen? Old school and a couple of keypresses, but it works!

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In JavaScript? No. I do work for a security company (sort of NetNanny type stuff) and the only effective way we've found to do screen captures of the user is with a hidden application.

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i thing you need a activeX controls. without it i can't imagine. you can force user to install them first after the installation on client side activex controls should work and you can capture.

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We are temporarily collecting Ajax states, data in form fields and session information. Then we re-render it at the support desk. Since we test and integrate for all browsers, there are hardly any support cases for display reasons.

Have a look at the red button at the bottom on holidaycheck

Alternatively there is html2canvas of Google. But it is only applicable for never browsers and I've never tried it.

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I have used GrabzIt to take screenshots before, they have a easy to use and free Javascript API to help you do this. To do this you do something like this:

<script type="text/javascript"
src="http://grabz.it/services/javascript.ashx?
key=APPLICATION KEY&url=http://www.google.com">
</script>
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Please see the answer shared here for a relatively successful implementation of this: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6678156/291640

Utilizing: https://github.com/niklasvh/html2canvas

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You can also do this with the Fireshot plugin. I use the following code (that I extracted from the API code so I don't need to include the API JS) to make a direct call to the Fireshot object:

    var element = document.createElement("FireShotDataElement");
element.setAttribute("Entire", true);
element.setAttribute("Action", 1);
element.setAttribute("Key", "");
element.setAttribute("BASE64Content", "");
element.setAttribute("Data", "C:/Users/jagilber/Downloads/whatev.jpg");

if (typeof(CapturedFrameId) != "undefined")
        element.setAttribute("CapturedFrameId", CapturedFrameId);


document.documentElement.appendChild(element);

var evt = document.createEvent("Events");
evt.initEvent("capturePageEvt", true, false);

element.dispatchEvent(evt);

Note: I don't know if this functionality is only available for the paid version or not.

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You might try PhantomJs, a headlesss browsing toolkit. http://phantomjs.org/

The following Javascript example demonstrates basic screenshot functionality:

var page = require('webpage').create();

page.settings.userAgent = 'UltimateBrowser/100';
page.viewportSize = { width: 1200, height: 1200 };
page.clipRect = { top: 0, left: 0, width: 1200, height: 1200 };

page.open('https://google.com/', function () {
page.render('output.png');
phantom.exit();
});
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This may not work for you, but on IE you can use the snapsie plugin. It doesn't seem to be in development anymore, but the last release is available from the linked site.

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Perhaps http://html2canvas.hertzen.com/ could be used. Then you can capture the display and then process it.

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