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suppose I want to calculate average value of a data-set such as

class Averager {
   float total;
   size_t count;
   float addData (float value) {
       this->total += value;
       return this->total / ++this->count;
   }
}

sooner or later the total or count value will overflow, so I make it doesn't remember the total value by :

class Averager {
   float currentAverage;
   size_t count;
   float addData (float value) {
       this->currentAverage = (this->currentAverage*count + value) / ++count;
       return this->currentAverage;
   }
}

it seems they will overflow longer, but the multiplication between average and count lead to overflow problem, so next solution is:

class Averager {
   float currentAverage;
   size_t count;
   float addData (float value) {
       this->currentAverage += (value - this->currentAverage) / ++count;
       return this->currentAverage;
   }
}

seems better, next problem is how to prevent count from overflow?

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5  
I think the problem of numerical inaccuracy is more serious than overflow. –  kennytm Jul 23 '10 at 7:51
    
It is very unlikely that total will overflow. It will lose accuracy if it becomes much larger than the average. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 23 '10 at 7:57
    
@kenny: there will be some accuracy lost, but as count grow, any value added is less sensitive to average, it could be solved statistically. –  uray Jul 23 '10 at 7:58
    
@marcelo: if count is 32 bit, it will overflow if counter is more than 2^32 –  uray Jul 23 '10 at 8:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Aggregated buckets.

We pick a bucket size that's comfortably less than squareRoot(MAXINT). To keep it simple, let's pick 10.

Each new value is added to the current bucket, and the moving average can be computed as you describe.

When the bucket is full start a new bucket, remembering the average of the full bucket. We can safely calculate the overall average by combining the averages of the full buckets and the current, partial bucket. When we get to 10 full buckets, we create a bigger bucket, capacity 100.

To compute the total average we first compute the average of the "10s" and then combine that with the "100s". This pattern repeats for "1,000s" "10,000s" and so on. At each stage we only need to consider two levels one 10 x bigger than the previous one.

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I think what you describe is the "Moving Average" (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moving_average) –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 23 '10 at 8:12
1  
@DR I think it's a bit more than that - classic moving average needs to maintain a count of how many items we have seen, and eventually this can overflow. The technique I describe avoids that problem. –  djna Jul 23 '10 at 8:23
    
Ah, ok, you are right. –  Daniel Rikowski Jul 23 '10 at 8:32

Use double total; unsigned long long count;. You should still worry about accuracy, but it will be much less of a problem than with float.

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I need statistic approach to this problem, no matter how large the data type of counter sooner or later it will overflow –  uray Jul 23 '10 at 8:02
1  
Or a big int :) –  Peter Alexander Jul 23 '10 at 8:03
4  
@uray: Are you serious? A 64-bit counter will take 70 years to wrap around even if you increment it 4 billion times a second. Are you expecting a 70-year uptime for your program? Are you expecting to have to average more than 18 quintillion numbers? –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 23 '10 at 8:13
1  
@uray and Marcelo: I see no possible solution then. Eventually the virtual memory will be exhausted or the universe will collapse. ;-) –  Peter G. Jul 23 '10 at 8:17
    
@marcelo:the problem is as count grow, this part (value - this->currentAverage) / ++count will become zero and no calculation required, so larger data type is useless. –  uray Jul 23 '10 at 8:30

What about using Arbitrary-precision arithmetic ?

There's a list of libraries you could use on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bignum#Libraries

Most of Arbitrary-precision arithmetic libraries will not overflow until the number of digits stored fill the available memory (which is quite unlikely).

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You could use these special datatypes where integeres can grow infinitely until your RAM is full.

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You want to use kahan's summation algorithm:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahan_summation_algorithm

See also the section about errors in summation in "What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic"

http://docs.sun.com/source/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html#1262

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Kahan's algorithm reduces the precision lost, but won't solve the overflow problem. –  kennytm Jul 23 '10 at 8:56

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