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How do I shuffle the characters in a string (e.g. hello could be ehlol or lleoh or ...). I don't want to use the Collections.shuffle(...) method, is there anything simpler?

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6  
don't want to, or your lecturer told you not to? –  Andrew Bullock Jul 23 '10 at 8:52
2  
I doubt that there is anything simpler than something that is already available for you to use... (at least in this case) –  npinti Jul 23 '10 at 8:55
    
don't want to use shuffle –  user339108 Jul 23 '10 at 9:03

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I dont know anything simpler. But you can use the Math.rand() functionality to generate a random number within the range of the character's length without replace and that would give you a shuffled output

public class Shuffle {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Shuffle s = new Shuffle();
        s.shuffle("hello");

    }
    public void shuffle(String input){
        List<Character> characters = new ArrayList<Character>();
        for(char c:input.toCharArray()){
            characters.add(c);
        }
        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder(input.length());
        while(characters.size()!=0){
            int randPicker = (int)(Math.random()*characters.size());
            output.append(characters.remove(randPicker));
        }
        System.out.println(output.toString());
    }
}
/*
Sample outputs
hlleo
llheo
leohl
lleho
*/
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Not great performance, but quite readable in my opinion:

public static String shuffleString(String string)
{
  List<String> letters = Arrays.asList(string.split(""));
  Collections.shuffle(letters);
  String shuffled = "";
  for (String letter : letters) {
    shuffled += letter;
  }
  return shuffled;
}
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class ShuffleString
{

    public static String shuffle(String s)
    {

        String shuffledString = ""; 

        while (s.length() != 0)
        {
            int index = (int) Math.floor(Math.random() * s.length());
            char c = s.charAt(index);
            s = s.substring(0,index)+s.substring(index+1);
            shuffledString += c;
        }

        return shuffledString;

    }

}


public class foo{
    static public void main(String[] args)
    {

        String test = "hallo";
        test = ShuffleString.shuffle(test);
        System.out.println(test);
    }
}

Output: ahlol

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E.g.:

static String shuffle(String text){
    if (text.length()<=1)
        return text;

    int split=text.length()/2;

    String temp1=shuffle(text.substring(0,split));
    String temp2=shuffle(text.substring(split));

    if (Math.random() > 0.5) 
        return temp1 + temp2;
    else 
        return temp2 + temp1;
}    
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How about this:

public static String shuffle(String text) {
    char[] characters = text.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < characters.length; i++) {
        int randomIndex = (int)(Math.random() * characters.length);
        char temp = characters[i];
        characters[i] = characters[randomIndex];
        characters[randomIndex] = temp;
    }
    return new String(characters);
}
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You could iterate over all the characters, comparing each one with the next. Then if Math.rand() > 0.5 swap this character with the next, otherwise move on to the next character.

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Here's code that requires neither recursion, nor converting to a Collection.

public static String shuffle(String string) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(string.length());
    double rnd;
    for (char c: string.toCharArray()) {
        rnd = Math.random();
        if (rnd < 0.34)
            sb.append(c);
        else if (rnd < 0.67)
            sb.insert(sb.length() / 2, c);
        else
            sb.insert(0, c);
    }       
    return sb.toString();
}
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Not sure why you wouldn't want to use shuffle, unless it's for school. ;)

And if you're concerned with performance, you definitely can't use any solution that concatenates strings with "+".

Here's the most compact solution I could come up with:

public static String shuffle(String string) {
    if (StringUtils.isBlank(string) {
        return string;
    }

    final List<Character> randomChars = new ArrayList<>();
    CollectionUtils.addAll(randomChars, ArrayUtils.toObject(string.toCharArray()));
    Collections.shuffle(randomChars);
    return StringUtils.join(randomChars, "");
}
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    function shuffle(str) {
      return str.split("").sort(function () {return Math.random()-0.5}).join("");
    }

This is the easiest way to shuffle a string. The function call sorts ascending when positive or descending when negative. The Math.random function yields numbers between 0 and 1 and when 0.5 is subtracted, the result is randomly positive or negative. Thus pairs are randomly put in descending or ascending order. The split function converts a string into an array and the join function puts the final array back into a string.

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
Is this Java?.. –  cherouvim May 8 at 9:00
    
This is not Java. –  ValekHalfHeart Oct 19 at 3:16

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