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I was taking a look at the assert() reference page and I got stuck while I read the given example:

/* assert example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

int main ()
{
  FILE * datafile;
  datafile=fopen ("file.dat","r");
  assert (datafile);

  fclose (datafile);

  return 0;
}

In this example, assert is used to abort the program execution if datafile compares equal to 0, which happens when the previous call to fopen was not successful.

I totally agree that if fopen() fails, assert() will abort execution. However I'm concerned about the rightness of this example:

In my opinion assert() is there to detect cases that can't normally happen (like passing a NULL pointer to a function whose documentation states it is forbidden).

In this example, failing to open a file is not something that can't normally happen. In fact, I can see dozens of reasons why this would fail. The file couldn't exist, the program could run without required privileges, and so on.

I would rather have done something like:

/* not longer an assert example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

int main ()
{
  FILE * datafile;
  datafile=fopen ("file.dat","r");

  if (datafile != NULL)
  {
    // Do something, whatever.
    fclose (datafile);
  } else
  {
    // Report the error somehow.
  }

  return 0;
}

Is my understanding of how assert() should be used incorrect ?


EDIT AND GOOD NEWS !

It seems the referred site is ruled by rigorous people. Here is the mail I got back from one of the site maintainer:

Hi Julien, I have to agree, the example code was poorly chosen. It has now been just rewritten to something more appropriate.

Many thanks for pointing this out, and sorry for any inconveniences this may have caused to you.

Best regards,

And the updated example:

/* assert example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

void print_number(int* myInt) {
  assert (myInt!=NULL);
  printf ("%d\n",*myInt);
}

int main ()
{
  int a=10;
  int * b = NULL;
  int * c = NULL;

  b=&a;

  print_number (b);
  print_number (c);

  return 0;
}

Glad to see that some people do their work well on the Internet ! ;)

share|improve this question
8  
+1 For recognising that this is a bad example. +2 For then mailing the site contacts. –  David Relihan Jul 23 '10 at 9:52
4  
Your understanding is spot on. assert is for programming errors, not user errors. –  GManNickG Jul 23 '10 at 9:56
    
I removed the C++ tag, as there is not a scrap of C++ code in the post. –  Puppy Jul 23 '10 at 10:29
    
To the guy who downvoted the question: why ? @DeadMG: assert() can be used in C++ as well. The tag was just here to widen the audience as people that only do C++ might also be interested by the answers. –  ereOn Jul 23 '10 at 12:55
1  
In general, the language tags are for questions specific to that language (most languages have assert functionality, you'd need hundreds of tags to mark them all), but I'm confused here. From the edit history, it looks like even the first revision of the question had 1. a link to cplusplus.com, and 2. code examples written in C++. I don't get why having the c++ tag is wrong then. Also +1 from here –  jalf Jul 23 '10 at 14:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're perfectly right sir. This is a poor usage of assert.

share|improve this answer
    
indeed, assert should only be last resort aka world collapse –  RvdK Jul 23 '10 at 9:34
2  
Thanks for the feedback. I wrote to the contact page to inform them about the problem. I wonder if they will update it. –  ereOn Jul 23 '10 at 9:37
    
+1 for this can be potential answer ;-) –  Kedar Jul 23 '10 at 13:09

You are right indeed. As other people have already pointed out, assert() will be more than likely compiled out in the release build (I've seen people force the asserts to be left in for the release build).

I just wanted to add a horror story related to this question that I've seen on a code-base:

assert(do_something() == NO_ERR);

Some people should not be allowed to use a keyboard.

share|improve this answer
1  
True. Although it depends on what do_something() does. if do_something() is really do_complex_validation_that_system_state_is_valid() then it might be reasonable if it has no side effects –  jcoder Jul 25 '10 at 18:30

Minor notification: it would be better if you write..

FILE * datafile = NULL;

Also, assert only works in debug mode... so your method is better.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, this is not my code. And while I usually initialize my local variables, here datafile is assigned right after its declaration, so it doesn't really matter ;) Good point about debug mode, I didn't even thought of that. –  ereOn Jul 23 '10 at 9:31
    
What makes you say it works only in debug mode? –  Praveen S Jul 23 '10 at 9:47
1  
@Praveen: assert is a macro that does something only when NDEBUG isn't defined. So usually in debug mode. –  ereOn Jul 23 '10 at 9:55

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