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I have to split a vector into n chunks of equal size in R. I couldn't find any base function to do that. Also Google didn't get me anywhere. So here is what I came up with, hopefully it helps someone some where.

x <- 1:10
n <- 3
chunk <- function(x,n) split(x, factor(sort(rank(x)%%n)))
chunk(x,n)
$`0`
[1] 1 2 3

$`1`
[1] 4 5 6 7

$`2`
[1]  8  9 10

Any comments, suggestions or improvements are really welcome and appreciated.

Cheers, Sebastian

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4  
Yes, it's very unclear that what you get is the solution to "n chunks of equal size". But maybe this gets you there too: x <- 1:10; n <- 3; split(x, cut(x, n, labels = FALSE)) –  mdsumner Jul 23 '10 at 14:08
    
both the solution in the question, and the solution in the preceding comment are incorrect, in that they might not work, if the vector has repeated entries. Try this: > foo <- c(rep(1, 12), rep(2,3), rep(3,3)) [1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 > chunk(foo, 2) (gives wrong result) > chunk(foo, 3) (also wrong) –  mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:21
    
(continuing preceding comment) why? rank(x) doesn't need to be an integer > rank(c(1,1,2,3)) [1] 1.5 1.5 3.0 4.0 so that's why the method in the question fails. this one works (thanks to Harlan below) > chunk2 <- function(x,n) split(x, cut(seq_along(x), n, labels = FALSE)) –  mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:33
    
> split(foo, cut(foo, 3, labels = FALSE)) (also wrong) –  mathheadinclouds Apr 29 '13 at 9:34

9 Answers 9

A one-liner splitting d into chunks of size 20:

split(d, ceiling(seq_along(d)/20))

More details: I think all you need is seq_along(), split() and ceiling():

> d <- rpois(73,5)
> d
 [1]  3  1 11  4  1  2  3  2  4 10 10  2  7  4  6  6  2  1  1  2  3  8  3 10  7  4
[27]  3  4  4  1  1  7  2  4  6  0  5  7  4  6  8  4  7 12  4  6  8  4  2  7  6  5
[53]  4  5  4  5  5  8  7  7  7  6  2  4  3  3  8 11  6  6  1  8  4
> max <- 20
> x <- seq_along(d)
> d1 <- split(d, ceiling(x/max))
> d1
$`1`
 [1]  3  1 11  4  1  2  3  2  4 10 10  2  7  4  6  6  2  1  1  2

$`2`
 [1]  3  8  3 10  7  4  3  4  4  1  1  7  2  4  6  0  5  7  4  6

$`3`
 [1]  8  4  7 12  4  6  8  4  2  7  6  5  4  5  4  5  5  8  7  7

$`4`
 [1]  7  6  2  4  3  3  8 11  6  6  1  8  4
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2  
I'm giving this one +1 for clarity and because it's concise. I also hope this is what Sebastian was looking for. :) –  Roman Luštrik Jul 24 '10 at 10:24
1  
+1. Nice one-liner, and no sort needed, too. –  krlmlr Jun 6 '12 at 20:30
    
Very clear and concise. Thank you. –  vatodorov Aug 25 '13 at 21:03
2  
The question asks for n chunks of equal size. This gets you an unknown number of chunks of size n. I had the same problem and used the solutions from @mathheadinclouds. –  rrs Apr 21 at 18:26
    
its also works with character vectors. +1 ...very intuitive :) –  JstRoRR Jun 24 at 10:56

This will split it differently to what you have, but is still quite a nice list structure I think:

chunk.2 <- function(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE, len = length(x), groups = trunc(len/n), overflow = len%%n) { 
  if(force.number.of.groups) {
    f1 <- as.character(sort(rep(1:n, groups)))
    f <- as.character(c(f1, rep(n, overflow)))
  } else {
    f1 <- as.character(sort(rep(1:groups, n)))
    f <- as.character(c(f1, rep("overflow", overflow)))
  }

  g <- split(x, f)

  if(force.number.of.groups) {
    g.names <- names(g)
    g.names.ordered <- as.character(sort(as.numeric(g.names)))
  } else {
    g.names <- names(g[-length(g)])
    g.names.ordered <- as.character(sort(as.numeric(g.names)))
    g.names.ordered <- c(g.names.ordered, "overflow")
  }

  return(g[g.names.ordered])
}

Which will give you the following, depending on how you want it formatted:

> x <- 1:10; n <- 3
> chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = FALSE)
$`1`
[1] 1 2 3

$`2`
[1] 4 5 6

$`3`
[1] 7 8 9

$overflow
[1] 10

> chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE)
$`1`
[1] 1 2 3

$`2`
[1] 4 5 6

$`3`
[1]  7  8  9 10

Running a couple of timings using these settings:

set.seed(42)
x <- rnorm(1:1e7)
n <- 3

Then we have the following results:

> system.time(chunk(x, n)) # your function 
   user  system elapsed 
 29.500   0.620  30.125 

> system.time(chunk.2(x, n, force.number.of.groups = TRUE))
   user  system elapsed 
  5.360   0.300   5.663 

EDIT: Changing from as.factor() to as.character() in my function made it twice as fast.

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+1 for showing the timings which are interesting. –  Christine Forrester Jul 23 '10 at 17:29
chunk2 <- function(x,n) split(x, cut(seq_along(x), n, labels = FALSE)) 
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A few more variants to the pile...

> x <- 1:10
> n <- 3

Note, that you don't need to use the factor function here, but you still want to sort o/w your first vector would be 1 2 3 10:

> chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rank(x) %% n))
> chunk(x,n)
$`0`
[1] 1 2 3
$`1`
[1] 4 5 6 7
$`2`
[1]  8  9 10

Or you can assign character indices, vice the numbers in left ticks above:

> my.chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rep(letters[1:n], each=n, len=length(x))))
> my.chunk(x, n)
$a
[1] 1 2 3 4
$b
[1] 5 6 7
$c
[1]  8  9 10

Or you can use plainword names stored in a vector. Note that using sort to get consecutive values in x alphabetizes the labels:

> my.other.chunk <- function(x, n) split(x, sort(rep(c("tom", "dick", "harry"), each=n, len=length(x))))
> my.other.chunk(x, n)
$dick
[1] 1 2 3
$harry
[1] 4 5 6
$tom
[1]  7  8  9 10
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split(x,matrix(1:n,n,length(x))[1:length(x)])

perhaps this is more clear, but the same idea:
split(x,rep(1:n, ceiling(length(x)/n),length.out = length(x)))

if you want it ordered,throw a sort around it

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You could combine the split/cut, as suggested by mdsummer, with quantile to create even groups:

split(x,cut(x,quantile(x,(0:n)/n), include.lowest=TRUE, labels=FALSE))

This gives the same result for your example, but not for skewed variables.

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I needed the same function and have read the previous solutions, however i also needed to have the unbalanced chunk to be at the end i.e if i have 10 elements to split them into vectors of 3 each, then my result should have vectors with 3,3,4 elements respectively. So i used the following (i left the code unoptimised for readability, otherwise no need to have many variables):

chunk <- function(x,n){
  numOfVectors <- floor(length(x)/n)
  elementsPerVector <- c(rep(n,numOfVectors-1),n+length(x) %% n)
  elemDistPerVector <- rep(1:numOfVectors,elementsPerVector)
  split(x,factor(elemDistPerVector))
}
set.seed(1)
x <- rnorm(10)
n <- 3
chunk(x,n)
$`1`
[1] -0.6264538  0.1836433 -0.8356286

$`2`
[1]  1.5952808  0.3295078 -0.8204684

$`3`
[1]  0.4874291  0.7383247  0.5757814 -0.3053884
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Here's another variant.

NOTE: with this sample you're specifying the CHUNK SIZE in the second parameter

  1. all chunks are uniform, except for the last;
  2. the last will at worst be smaller, never bigger than the chunk size.

chunk <- function(x,n)
{
    f <- sort(rep(1:(trunc(length(x)/n)+1),n))[1:length(x)]
    return(split(x,f))
}

#Test
n<-c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)

c<-chunk(n,5)

q<-lapply(c, function(r) cat(r,sep=",",collapse="|") )
#output
1,2,3,4,5,|6,7,8,9,10,|11,|
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Credit to @Sebastian for this function

chunk <- function(x,y){
         split(x, factor(sort(rank(row.names(x))%%y)))
         }
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