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Inside a large loop, I currently have a statement similar to

if (ptr == NULL || ptr->calculate() > 5) 
  {do something} 

where ptr is an object pointer set before the loop and never changed.

I would like to avoid comparing ptr to NULL in every iteration of the loop. (The current final program does that, right?) A simple solution would be to write the loop code once for (ptr == NULL) and once for (ptr != NULL). But this would increase the amount of code making it more difficult to maintain, plus it looks silly if the same large loop appears twice with only one or two lines changed.

What can I do? Use dynamically-valued constants maybe and hope the compiler is smart? How?

Many thanks!

EDIT by Luther Blissett. The OP wants to know if there is a better way to remove the pointer check here:

loop {
 A; 
 if (ptr==0 || ptr->calculate()>5) B;
 C;
}

than duplicating the loop as shown here:

if (ptr==0) 
loop {
 A; 
 B;
 C;
} 
else loop {
 A;
 if (ptr->calculate()>5) B;
 C;
}
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The pointer check should not eat time, in particular in a large loop. Why do you want to save it? –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 23 '10 at 14:42
    
@Luther Blissett: I thought it would, marginally. And since it is redundant... Thanks for clarifying my post –  Frank Seifert Jul 23 '10 at 14:45
    
thanks for the insights, will keep it the way it is :) –  Frank Seifert Jul 23 '10 at 15:19
    
It appears that at least GCC with -O3 is capable of moving the pointer comparison out of the loop and generating two different loops. –  UncleBens Jul 23 '10 at 15:22
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++, although completely overkill you can put the loop in a function and use a template. This will generate twice the body of the function, but eliminate the extra check which will be optimized out. While I certainly don't recommend it, here is the code:

template<bool ptr_is_null>
void loop() {
    for(int i = x; i != y; ++i) {
       /**/
       if(ptr_is_null || ptr->calculate() > 5) {
          /**/
       }
       /**/
    }
}

You call it with:

if (ptr==NULL) loop<true>(); else loop<false>();

You are better off without this "optimization", the compiler will probably do the RightThing(TM) for you.

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1  
+1: The trick is to convert a runtime condition (ptr==NULL) into a compile time condition (ptr_is_null). –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 23 '10 at 14:55
1  
Ah, that's simpler than mine was! +1 from me. –  sbi Jul 23 '10 at 15:15
1  
That is clever :) –  Frank Seifert Jul 23 '10 at 15:21
    
Overly complicated, pointless attempt at optimization. While you are at it, why not make another template parameter to branch on the result of calculate() > 5? How about on the length of the loop? Terrible solution. –  John Jul 23 '10 at 18:14
    
@John: it is your comment that is pointless! The point of my answer is to show a possibility. I said explicitly that I didn't recommend doing it, and yet you come and say that it's a terrible solution... pff –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 28 '10 at 11:20
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Since

ptr is an object pointer set before the loop and never changed

can't you just check if it is null before the loop and not check again... since you don't change it.

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If it is not valid for your pointer to be NULL, you could use a reference instead.

If it is valid for your pointer to be NULL, but if so then you skip all processing, then you could either wrap your code with one check at the beginning, or return early from your function:

if (ptr != NULL)
{
  // your function
}

or

if (ptr == NULL) { return; }

If it is valid for your pointer to be NULL, but only some processing is skipped, then keep it like it is.

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A 'large loop' smells like an opportunity to refactor the loop into separate functions, in order to make the code easier to maintain. Then you can easily have two variants of the loop, one for ptr == null and one for ptr != null, calling different functions, with just a rough similarity in the overall structure of the loop.

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Why do you want to avoid comparing to NULL?

Creating a variant for each of the NULL and non-NULL cases just gives you almost twice as much code to write, test and more importantly maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, a check to NULL is almost nothing in terms of performance. –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 23 '10 at 14:44
    
Not true. Helltone showed that you can create variants of the loop without duplicating the loop. –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 23 '10 at 15:04
    
@Luther Blissett: Yeah, and you could also craft up some stuff using inline assembley. But it's just not worth it. Besides templates aren't typically supported in C and this was a tagged with both C and C++. –  torak Jul 23 '10 at 15:12
    
The usual trick for this kind of problem under C is to put the loop in a header and include the header multiple times while redefining a macro for the condition you want to vary about. Also, I don't know the OP's code, but the optimization might be worth it under certain conditions. For example, if there is more than one line with the pointer check and all the other operations are cheap. Eliminating (ptr==NULL) means, that a branch can be avoided which improves branch prediction, instruction prefetch etc. I've seen suprising things coming from innocuous changes. –  Nordic Mainframe Jul 23 '10 at 15:22
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if (ptr == NULL || ptr->calculate() > 5) 
  {do something} 

I would simply think in terms of what is done if the condition is true.

If "do something" is really the exact same stuff for (ptr == NULL) or (ptr->calculate() > 5), then I hardly see a reason to split up anything.

If "do something" contains particular cases for either condition, then I would consider to refactor into separate loops to get rid of extra special case checking. Depends on the special cases involved.

Eliminating code duplication is good up to a point. You should not care too much about optimizing until your program does what it should do and until performance becomes a problem.

[...] Premature optimization is the root of all evil

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Program_optimization

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I just wanted to inform you, that apparently GCC can do this requested hoisting in the optimizer. Here's a model loop (in C):

struct C
{
 int (*calculate)();
};

void sideeffect1();
void sideeffect2();
void sideeffect3();

void foo(struct C *ptr) 
{
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<1000;i++) 
    {
        sideeffect1();
        if (ptr == 0 || ptr->calculate()>5) sideeffect2(); 
        sideeffect3();
    }
}

Compiling this with gcc 4.5 and -O3 gives:

.globl foo
    .type   foo, @function
foo:
.LFB0:
    pushq   %rbp
.LCFI0:
    movq    %rdi, %rbp
    pushq   %rbx
.LCFI1:
    subq    $8, %rsp
.LCFI2:
    testq   %rdi, %rdi        # ptr==0? -> .L2, see below
    je  .L2
    movl    $1000, %ebx
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L4:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect1      # sideeffect1
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    *0(%rbp)         # call p->calculate, no check for ptr==0
    cmpl    $5, %eax
    jle .L3
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect2      # ok, call sideeffect2
.L3:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect3
    subl    $1, %ebx
    jne .L4
    addq    $8, %rsp
.LCFI3:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    popq    %rbx
.LCFI4:
    popq    %rbp
.LCFI5:
    ret
.L2:                       # here's the loop with ptr==0
.LCFI6:
    movl    $1000, %ebx
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L6:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect1    # does not try to call ptr->calculate() anymore
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect2    
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    sideeffect3
    subl    $1, %ebx
    jne .L6
    addq    $8, %rsp
.LCFI7:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    popq    %rbx
.LCFI8:
    popq    %rbp
.LCFI9:
    ret

And so does clang 2.7 (-O3):

foo:
.Leh_func_begin1:
    pushq   %rbp
.Llabel1:
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
.Llabel2:
    pushq   %r14
    pushq   %rbx
.Llabel3:
    testq   %rdi, %rdi        # ptr==NULL -> .LBB1_5
    je  .LBB1_5
    movq    %rdi, %rbx   
    movl    $1000, %r14d
    .align  16, 0x90
.LBB1_2:
    xorb    %al, %al          # here's the loop with the ptr->calculate check()
    callq   sideeffect1
    xorb    %al, %al
    callq   *(%rbx)     
    cmpl    $6, %eax
    jl  .LBB1_4
    xorb    %al, %al
    callq   sideeffect2
.LBB1_4:
    xorb    %al, %al
    callq   sideeffect3
    decl    %r14d
    jne .LBB1_2
    jmp .LBB1_7
.LBB1_5:
    movl    $1000, %r14d      
    .align  16, 0x90
.LBB1_6:
    xorb    %al, %al        # and here's the loop for the ptr==NULL case
    callq   sideeffect1
    xorb    %al, %al
    callq   sideeffect2
    xorb    %al, %al
    callq   sideeffect3
    decl    %r14d
    jne .LBB1_6
.LBB1_7:
    popq    %rbx
    popq    %r14
    popq    %rbp
    ret
share|improve this answer
    
+1: nice idea of looking into the assembly, I did think of it but was too lazy for actually doing that myself :-) –  Giovanni Funchal Jul 28 '10 at 11:21
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