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I have a bunch of strings in perl that all look like this:

10 NE HARRISBURG
4 E HASWELL
2 SE OAKLEY
6 SE REDBIRD
PROVO
6 W EADS
21 N HARRISON

What I am needing to do is remove the numbers and the letters from before the city names. The problem I am having is that it varies a lot from city to city. The data is almost never the same. Is it possible to remove this data and keep it in a separate string?

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Did you mean "the letters", not "the letter"? –  Arkadiy Jul 23 '10 at 14:51
    
what speaks against splitting the string on whitespace and using the last field as caty name? –  knittl Jul 23 '10 at 14:52
    
Nothing I am just not sure what to do with the changing whitespaces. In these values there is always 2 whitespaces if there is any but in some there is only one whitespace. –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 14:57
    
Please see my solution. I'm confused what you mean by: Is it possible to remove this data and keep it in a separate string? –  user376314 Jul 24 '10 at 23:31
    
Shinjuo, this seems similar to your Hail/Wind reports you were scraping before. I emailed Armando an update to his answer -- see his Solution #1. It probably has what you need, since it seems like you want to store the speed/dir and the city. I put it in a hash, but you could just as easy put it in an array. –  vol7ron Jul 25 '10 at 0:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
my @l = (
'10 NE HARRISBURG',
'4 E HASWELL',
'2 SE OAKLEY',
'6 SE REDBIRD',
'PROVO',
'6 W EADS',
'21 N HARRISON',
);

foreach(@l) {

according to hoobs i changed the regex

    my($beg, $rest) = ($_ =~ /^(\d*\s(?:[NS]|[NS]?[EW])*)?(.*)$/);
    print "beg=$beg \trest=$rest\n";    
}

output:

beg=10 NE   rest=HARRISBURG
beg=4 E     rest=HASWELL
beg=2 SE    rest=OAKLEY
beg=6 SE    rest=REDBIRD
beg=    rest=PROVO
beg=6 W     rest=EADS
beg=21 N    rest=HARRISON

for shinjuo, if you want to run only one string you can do :

  my($beg, $rest) = ($l[3] =~ /^(\d*\s(?:[NS]|[NS]?[EW])*)?(.*)$/);
  print "beg=$beg \trest=$rest\n";

and to avoid warning on uninitialized value you have to test if $beg is defined:

print defined$beg?"beg=$beg\t":"", "rest=$rest\n";
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Awesome this looks like it will work well –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 15:01
1  
@M42,@shinjuo:I think, in the second last record, regular expression fails.It should be: beg= 6 W rest= EADS. –  Nikhil Jain Jul 23 '10 at 16:04
    
I did not notice that, but you are correct thanks –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 16:39
1  
You're right. i've corrected the regex. –  M42 Jul 23 '10 at 17:26
1  
I like this one because it's using a feature of the data that the others don't. You could probably extend it even a little more, in that a direction isn't just /[NSEW]*/; it's /[NS]|[NS]?[EW]/ (that is, it's either N, S, E, or W alone, or it's one of N/S followed by one of E/W. The number and the order aren't arbitrary. That might save you some day if the city happens to be NEW ABILENE :) –  hobbs Jul 24 '10 at 0:45

Try this:

for my $s (@strings) {
    my @fields = split /\s+/, $s, 3;
    my $city = $fields[-1];
}

You can test the array size to determine the number of fields:

my $n = @fields;
share|improve this answer
    
I'd add a limit to the number of fields that can be split, otherwise you'll get a surprise when you try to parse 2 SE SAN FRANCISCO. –  Ether Jul 23 '10 at 15:00
    
@Ether: Thanks, corrected. –  eugene y Jul 23 '10 at 15:03

Looks like you always want the very last element in the result of split(). Or you can go with m/(\S+)$/.

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I think it is always the last element, but you never know when someone else is inputing the data. –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 14:59
    
@shinjuo: If you cannot define your input, how do you expect to define your output? You need at least some specification. Even if it's broad, you still need to say that you will reject data that doesn't conform. –  Daenyth Jul 23 '10 at 15:46
    
That is what I will have to do. I wasnt saying I wanted to keep screwed up data I am just saying there may be the chance something could be tacked on the end so that may change how it is written –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 16:40

Can't we assume there is always a city name and that it appears last on a line? If that's the case, split the line and keep the last portion of it. Here's a one liner command line solution:

perl -lne 'split ; print $_[-1]' input.txt

Output:

HARRISBURG
HASWELL
OAKLEY
REDBIRD
PROVO
EADS
HARRISON

Update 1

This solution won't work if you have composed city names like SAN FRANCISCO (case spotted in a comment below).

Where is your input data coming from? If you have generated it yourself, you should add delimiters. If someone generated it for you, ask them to regenerate it with delimiters. Parsing it will then become child's play.

# replace ";" for your delimiter
perl -lne 'split ";" ; print $_[-1]' input.txt
share|improve this answer
    
I want to keep the to keep the front portion also. –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 14:59
2  
You can probably reduce that to perl -anE 'say $F[-1]' input.txt if you're using whitespace as the delimiter. –  Daenyth Jul 23 '10 at 15:48
    
I am not making it nor can I ask them to adjust it. –  shinjuo Jul 23 '10 at 18:27
    
@Daenyth: good to know. Thanks! –  Philippe A. Jul 26 '10 at 14:10

Regex Solution


Solution 1: Keep everything (vol7ron's emailed solution)


#!/usr/bin/perl -w    

use strict; 
use Data::Dumper;   

   sub main{    
      my @strings = (    
                      '10 NE HARRISBURG'    
                    , '4 E HASWELL'    
                    , '2 SE OAKLEY'    
                    , '6 SE REDBIRD'    
                    , 'PROVO'    
                    , '6 W EADS'    
                    , '21 N HARRISON'    
                    , '32 SAN FRANCISCO' 
                    , ''   
                    , '15 NEW YORK'    
                    , '15 NNW NEW YORK'    
                    , '15 NW NEW YORK'     
                    , 'NW NEW YORK'    
                    );       

      my %hash;
      my $count=0;
      for (@strings){    
         if (/\d*\s*[NS]{0,2}[EW]{0,1}\s+/){
            # if there was a speed / direction
            $hash{$count}{wind} = $&;
            $hash{$count}{city} = $';
         } else {
            # if there was only a city
            $hash{$count}{city} = $_;
         }
         $count++;
      }    

      print Dumper(\%hash);  
   }    

   main();  


Solution 2: Strip off what you don't need


#!/usr/bin/perl -w    

use strict;    

   sub main{    
      my @strings = (    
                      '10 NE HARRISBURG'    
                    , '4 E HASWELL'    
                    , '2 SE OAKLEY'    
                    , '6 SE REDBIRD'    
                    , 'PROVO'    
                    , '6 W EADS'    
                    , '21 N HARRISON'    
                    , '32 SAN FRANCISCO'    
                    , '15 NEW YORK'    
                    , '15 NNW NEW YORK'    
                    , '15 NW NEW YORK'     
                    , 'NW NEW YORK'     
                    );    

      for my $elem (@strings){    
         $elem =~ s/\d*\s*[NS]{0,2}[EW]{0,1}\s+(\w*)/$1/;    
      }    

      $"="\n";    
      print "@strings\n";        
   }    

   main();    

Update:

Making the changes with vol7ron's suggestion and example, using the repetition operator worked. This will strip off leading digits and the direction and won't break if the digits or direction (or both) are missing.

share|improve this answer
    
looks good, but instead of \w+ might want to use \w{1,2}, since the direction seems to only be a max of 2 chars. If the OP uses 3 char directions (eg NNE,NSW) then you'd change the 2 for a 3. –  vol7ron Jul 24 '10 at 23:00
    
Instead of \w you might also want to use char selection ([NSEW]{0,3}). That way if something like 2 SAN FRANCISCO comes along it won't chop off the SAN. –  vol7ron Jul 24 '10 at 23:03
1  
I haven't tried any of these suggestions out, but perhaps [NS]{0,2}[EW]{0,1} would be what you want, since it would take care of N,S,NE,SE,NW,SW,NNE,NNW,NSE,NSW,SSE,SSW,SNE,SNW, which wouldn't fail on NEW as Hobbs pointed out might happen. –  vol7ron Jul 24 '10 at 23:15

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