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I have the pretty print module, which I prepared because I was not happy the pprint module produced zillion lines for list of numbers which had one list of list. Here is example use of my module.

    >>> a=range(10)
    >>> a.insert(5,[range(i) for i in range(10)])
    >>> a
    [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, [[], [0], [0, 1], [0, 1, 2], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]], 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    >>> import pretty
    >>> pretty.ppr(a,indent=6)

    [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
          [
            [], 
            [0], 
            [0, 1], 
            [0, 1, 2], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 
            [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]], 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Code is like this:

""" pretty.py prettyprint module version alpha 0.2
    mypr: pretty string function
    ppr:  print of the pretty string
    ONLY list and tuple prettying implemented!
"""
def mypr(w, i = 0, indent = 2, nl = '\n') :
    """ w = datastructure, i = indent level, indent = step size for indention """
    startend = {list : '[]', tuple : '()'}
    if type(w) in (list, tuple) :
        start, end = startend[type(w)]
        pr = [mypr(j, i + indent, indent, nl) for j in w]
        return nl + ' ' * i + start + ', '.join(pr) + end
    else :  return repr(w)

def ppr(w, i = 0, indent = 2, nl = '\n') :
    """ see mypr, this is only print of mypr with same parameters """
    print mypr(w, i, indent, nl)

Here is one fixed text for table printing in my pretty print module:

## let's do it "manually"
width = len(str(10+10))
widthformat = '%'+str(width)+'i'
for i in range(10):
    for j in range(10):
        print widthformat % (i+j),
    print

Have you better alternative for this code to be generalized enough for the pretty printing module?

What I found for this kind of regular cases after posting the question is this module: prettytable A simple Python library for easily displaying tabular data in a visually appealing ASCII table format

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1  
Your question is kinda "why is it doing exactly what I'm telling it to do?". The answer is that your expectations about what it should be doing for you don't match what it does. –  msw Jul 23 '10 at 15:32
    
I have expectations that generators should yield useful results for interpreter. Icon language gives nicely 0..n answers. Icon language fails my expectation for interpretive use, which Python mostly fullfills. Expectations and laziness are source of development :) –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 23 '10 at 15:40
    
Generators cannot be printed because they cannot be rewound (by definition). So, your expectations make no sense, be glad they are not fullfilled :p What you mean by 0 .. n is xrange(0, n) in Python and they have a very sensible representation. –  Jochen Ritzel Jul 23 '10 at 15:44
    
xrange is limited only C long numbers by implementation and the benefits of range over xrange are usually minimal. The difference is still there, if you read my post of prime sieve optimization (actually most sensible optimization is to code it in C or use psyco). –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 23 '10 at 19:52
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4 Answers

If you're looking for nice formatting for matrices, numpy's output looks great right out of the box:

from numpy import *
print array([[i + j for i in range(10)] for j in range(10)])

Output:

[[ 0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9]
 [ 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10]
 [ 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11]
 [ 3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12]
 [ 4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13]
 [ 5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14]
 [ 6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15]
 [ 7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16]
 [ 8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17]
 [ 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18]]
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This solution is nice, but it is not general enough to put in pretty print module. Good response for my first request of doing this as automatically as possible. From the layout of your code which is str not repr, I desided to change the others line to else : return str(w) –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 26 '10 at 19:40
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You can write:

'\n'.join(  # join the lines with '\n'
       ' '.join(  # join one line with ' '
              "%2d" % (i + j) # format each item
        for i in range(10))
    for j in range(10))
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Not so bad at all, but every odd day I still think it ugly to do this kind of tricks for concatenating of strings, every even day I think it a super-Pythonic and smile to myself while writing such a Clever Pythonic code ('\n'.join instead of multiple prints). –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 23 '10 at 16:01
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Using George Sakkis' table indention recipe:

print(indent(((i + j for i in range(10)) for j in range(10)),
             delim=' ', justify='right'))

yields:

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13
5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14
6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

PS. To get the above to work, I made one minor change to the recipe. I changed wrapfunc(item) to wrapfunc(str(item)):

def rowWrapper(row):
    newRows = [wrapfunc(str(item)).split('\n') for item in row]
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Looks simple until you look the amount of code in behind the linked recipe. Compared to for example the 9 non-comment lines of my pretty functions. –  Tony Veijalainen Jul 23 '10 at 20:00
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

My answer to this kind of regular cases would be to use this module: prettytable A simple Python library for easily displaying tabular data in a visually appealing ASCII table format

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