Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for an efficient way to achieve this:

  • you have a list of numbers 1.....n (typically: 1..5 or 1..7 or so - reasonably small, but can vary from case to case)

  • you need all combinations of all lengths for those numbers, e.g. all combinations of just one number ({1}, {2}, .... {n}), then all combinations of two distinct numbers ({1,2}, {1,3}, {1,4} ..... {n-1, n} ), then all combinations fo three of those numbers ({1,2,3}, {1,2,4}) and so forth

Basically, within the group, the order is irrelevant, so {1,2,3} is equivalent to {1,3,2} - it's just a matter of getting all groups of x numbers from that list

Seems like there ought to be a simple algorithm for this - but I have searched in vain so far. Most combinatorics and permutation algorithms seems to a) take order into account (e.g. 123 is not equal to 132), and they always seems to operate on a single string of characters or numbers....

Anyone have a great, nice'n'quick algorithm up their sleeve??

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
You are basically looking for the Power Set of your list (which is mathematically actually a set, if all of its items are unique). –  Justin L. Jul 23 '10 at 19:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Just increment a binary number and take the elements corresponding to bits that are set.

For instance, 00101101 would mean take the elements at indexes 0, 2, 3, and 5. Since your list is simply 1..n, the element is simply the index + 1.

This will generate in-order permuatations. In other words, only {1, 2, 3} will be generated. Not {1, 3, 2} or {2, 1, 3} or {2, 3, 1}, etc.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 very interesting approach ! Creative thinking - thanks! –  marc_s Jul 23 '10 at 15:30
    
@Henri's solution is pretty much an implementation of this idea, using LINQ. –  Nate Kohl Jul 23 '10 at 15:41
    
@Nate Kohl Yea I just commented on that. Pretty clever! Gave it a +1. –  jdmichal Jul 23 '10 at 15:43
    
+1 : a nice proof that the number of subsets of a given set of size N is 2^N –  Eyal Schneider Jul 23 '10 at 15:55
    
+1 Awesome approach –  Jan Jongboom Dec 22 '10 at 11:21

Not my code, but you're looking for the powerset. Google gave me this solution, which seems t work:

public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> GetPowerSet<T>(List<T> list)
{
    return from m in Enumerable.Range(0, 1 << list.Count)
              select
                  from i in Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count)
                  where (m & (1 << i)) != 0
                  select list[i];
}

Source: http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Power_set#C.23

share|improve this answer
2  
Just for clarification, this is my answer, implemented via LINQ. Which, I have to admit, is quite clever. –  jdmichal Jul 23 '10 at 15:42
    
Yep it is :) I liked you're solution, hence the code! –  Henri Jul 23 '10 at 15:48
3  
+1 clever implementation indeed ! Great contribution - thanks! –  marc_s Jul 23 '10 at 18:03
2  
Power Of Linq, a moment respect for it. –  Rev Jul 12 '14 at 19:01

This is something I have written in the past to accomplish such a task.

List<T[]> CreateSubsets<T>(T[] originalArray) 
{ 
    List<T[]> subsets = new List<T[]>(); 

    for (int i = 0; i < originalArray.Length; i++) 
    { 
        int subsetCount = subsets.Count; 
        subsets.Add(new T[] { originalArray[i] }); 

        for (int j = 0; j < subsetCount; j++) 
        { 
            T[] newSubset = new T[subsets[j].Length + 1]; 
            subsets[j].CopyTo(newSubset, 0); 
            newSubset[newSubset.Length - 1] = originalArray[i]; 
            subsets.Add(newSubset); 
        } 
    } 

    return subsets; 
}

It's generic, so it will work for ints, longs, strings, Foos, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 works like a charm - thanks! –  marc_s Jul 23 '10 at 18:03
1  
how do we use this ? –  MonsterMMORPG Jun 6 '13 at 2:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.