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public class Mtest extends Activity {
  Button b1;
  Button b2;
  public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    b1 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b1);
    b2 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b2);
    b1.setOnClickListener(myhandler);
    b2.setOnClickListener(myhandler);
    ...
  }
  View.OnClickListener myhandler = new View.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
      // MY QUESTION STARTS HERE!!!
      // IF b1 do this
      // IF b2 do this
      // MY QUESTION ENDS HERE!!!
    }
  }
}

How do I check which button has been clicked?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 76 down vote accepted

You will learn the way to do it, in an easy way, is:

public class Mtest extends Activity {
  Button b1;
  Button b2;
  public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    b1 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b1);
    b2 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b2);
    b1.setOnClickListener(myhandler1);
    b2.setOnClickListener(myhandler2);
    ...
  }
  View.OnClickListener myhandler1 = new View.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
      // it was the 1st button
    }
  };
  View.OnClickListener myhandler2 = new View.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
      // it was the 2nd button
    }
  };
}

Or, if you are working with just one clicklistener, you can do:

View.OnClickListener myOnlyhandler = new View.OnClickListener() {
  public void onClick(View v) {
      switch(v.getId()) {
        case R.id.b1:
          // it was the first button
          break;
        case R.id.b2:
          // it was the second button
          break;
      }
  }
}

Though, I don't recommend doing it that way since you will have to add an if for each button you use. That's hard to maintain.

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Well, actually that's not correct. View is not a Button, but Button is a View. Though, you can cast a View to a Button. Keep in mind that the second way to do it is not recommended... maybe that v may not be a Button, which will generate a cast exception. –  Cristian Jul 23 '10 at 17:07
1  
Actually both ways are not recommended, see my answer –  ognian Jul 23 '10 at 17:44
    
Its actually quite simple to replace the if, elses with a single switch case statement that you switch on the id of the view and the cases are id's from R.java –  slayton Sep 22 '11 at 17:18
    
Just wondering why you cast v to a Button anyway. getId() is defined for Views as well. Therefore I really wouldn't recommend the 2nd method but prefer Christian's solution! –  yoshi Apr 3 '12 at 10:21
    
Yes, you are right. I was a noob by that time (I am a noob still, but not like that :) –  Cristian Apr 4 '12 at 17:28
show 3 more comments

Or you can try the same but without listeners. On your button XML definition:

android:onClick="ButtonOnClick"

And in your code define the method ButtonOnClick:

public void ButtonOnClick(View v) {
    switch (v.getId()) {
      case R.id.button1:
        doSomething1();
        break;
      case R.id.button2:
        doSomething2();
        break;
      }
}
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Yeah. Thanks a lot –  echedey lorenzo May 9 '12 at 19:22
2  
Much cleaner than the other answers that use a bunch of event handlers, if statements, and listeners. Listeners are great if buttons are created at runtime, but that's often not the case. –  Dennis Oct 15 '12 at 7:51
    
This is a good answer! –  Mirko Oct 21 '12 at 11:27
3  
While an interesting different approach, XML hooks for listeners are rough around the corners with Fragments, as the callback must reside in the activity (not the fragment). –  donfede Dec 17 '12 at 0:31
    
My prob is doSomething2() cant be reached without throwing either an InvocationTargetException or a NullPointerException (or both). –  Quasaur Mar 7 '13 at 13:54
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I prefer:

class MTest extends Activity implements OnClickListener {
   public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    Button b1 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b1);
    Button b2 = (Button) findViewById(R.id.b2);
    b1.setOnClickListener(this);
    b2.setOnClickListener(this);
    ...

}

And then:

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
switch (v.getId()) {
    case R.id.b1:
        ....
        break;
    case R.id.b2:
       ....
       break;
    }   
}

Switch-case is easier to maintain than if-else, and this implementation doesn't require making many class variables.

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This worked perfectly. You need to implement OnClickListener-android.view.View and not OnClickListener-android.content.DialogInterface –  gkiko Mar 6 '13 at 17:17
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If you don't want to save instances of the 2 button in the class code, follow this BETTER way (this is more clear and fast!!) :

public void buttonPress(View v) {
  switch (v.getId()) {
    case R.id.button_one:
        // do something
        break;
    case R.id.button_two:
        // do something else
        break;
    case R.id.button_three:
        // i'm lazy, do nothing
        break;
  }
}
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1  
This is a better approach than the accepted reply. –  Xabier Nov 11 '13 at 19:30
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Another way of doing it is a single listener from activity , like this:

        public class MyActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {
    .......  code
    }

//my listener
@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
 if(v.getId() == R.id.mybutton)
 { 
   DoSomething();
   return;
 }

 if(v.getId() == R.id.mybutton2)
 { 
   DoSomething2();
   return;
 }

I Like to do it with single IF instead of switch-else, but if you prefer that, then you should do:

//my listener
@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
 switch(v.getId())
 {
   case R.id.mybutton:
   { 
     DoSomething();
     break;
   }

   case R.id.mybutton2 :
   {
     DoSomething();
     break;
   }
 }
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The best way is by switch-ing between v.getId(). Having separate anonymous OnClickListener for each Button is taking up more memory. Casting View to Button is unnecessary. Using if-else when switch is possible is slower and harder to read. In Android's source you can often notice comparing the references by if-else:

if (b1 == v) {
 // ...
} else if (b2 == v) {

I don't know exactly why they chose this way, but it works too.

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In addition to Cristian C's answer (sorry, I do not have the ability to make comments), if you make one handler for both buttons, you may directly compare v to b1 and b2, or if you want to compare by the ID, you do not need to cast v to Button (View has getId() method, too), and that way there is no worry of cast exception.

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Another option would be to do a "if (v instanceof Button) { // Cast to Button and do stuff here }" –  Andy Zhang Jul 23 '10 at 17:37
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Button mybutton=new Button(ViewPagerSample.this);
    mybutton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        }
    });
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use setTag();

like this:

@Override    
public void onClick(View v) {     
    int tag = (Integer) v.getTag();     
    switch (tag) {     
    case 1:     
        System.out.println("button1 click");     
        break;     
    case 2:     
        System.out.println("button2 click");     
       break;   
    }     
}     
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