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I have a solution I am migrating from Visual Studio 2005 to 2010. Inside the IDE on developers machines, everything works fine, but my build server (with CC.NET) is giving me an error.

I have around 10 projects, 3 of which are not strong-named due to using unsigned references.

One of them (signed) has an InternalsVisibleTo another of the signed projects.

In the IDE I use Debug/Release configuration, which delay-sign all of the projects that are to be strong-named.

I also created Debug_Signed and Debug_Unsigned configurations (and the corresponding Release_*), which only build the corresponding projects.

In my build server I use the actual private key to build first the Debug_Signed configuration, and then call MSBUILD again on the Debug_Unsigned configuration with SingAssembly=false.

This worked perfectly fine using .NET 2.0 SDK, but now the first MSBUILD works fine, but then the second MSBUILD tries to rebuild the signed projects (since they are referenced by the unsigned projectes), and I get an error about one assembly having an InternalsVisibleTo a signed assembly while the generated assembly is not signed:

error CS0281: Friend access was granted to 'Sic.Gateway.Customers, PublicKey=0024...4bbe', but the output assembly is named 'Sic.Gateway.Customers, Version=2.0.0.796, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null'. Try adding a reference to 'Sic.Gateway.Customers, PublicKey=0024...4bbe' or changing the output assembly name to match.

What I would like is the second MSBUILD to use the reference assemblys that were just built by the first MSBUILD instead of trying to rebuild them.

The build server just has the .NET 4.0 runtime (not the SDK) and I had to copy two .targets files (for SQL/CLR and web applications). But since everything seems to build fine, I don't think that would be a problem.

Does anyone have any idea of what I can do?

Thanks,

Luis Alonso Ramos

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I'm curious what happens if you switch the order in which they are built. –  Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi Aug 4 '10 at 7:17
    
@Sayed: I couldn't, because the unsigned projects depend on the signed ones (you cannot sign an assembly if it depends on an unsigned one). –  Luis Alonso Ramos Aug 7 '10 at 2:38
    
I solved the problem. This is what I did: When running MSBUILD for both the unsigned and signed assemblies I was specifying three properties: SignAssembly=true/false;DelaySign=False;AssemblyOriginatorKeyFile=D:\blah\blah.s‌​nk The thing is these properties applied to the whole solution, overriding the settings individual projects. What I did was specify only the DelaySign and key file properties, without specifying SignAssembly. That way, the assemblies that are to be signed are still signed (with the new non-delay-signing settings), and those that shouldn't be signed are not. –  Luis Alonso Ramos Aug 7 '10 at 2:42

1 Answer 1

(copied as answer from Luis' comment above)

When running MSBUILD for either the unsigned or signed assemblies I was specifying three properties:

SignAssembly=true\false;DelaySign=False;AssemblyOriginatorKeyFile=D:\blah\blah.s‌​nk 

The thing is these properties applied to the whole solution, overriding the settings from individual projects. What I did was specify only the DelaySign and key file properties, without specifying SignAssembly. That way, the assemblies that are to be signed are still signed (with the new non-delay-signing settings), and those that shouldn't be signed are not.

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