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Here is a quick and dirty GLUT based C++ program for windows that draws two rectangles, blue and green on a flat red background. Pressing 'a' or 'z' makes them orbit along the X axis in either direction. My problem is that if I enable GL_DEPTH_TEST, it sometimes draws one rectangle, sometimes two or sometimes just the background but never correctly with the nearer polygon obscuring some or all parts of the farther one. Not setting GL_DEPTH_TEST just makes the polygons appear in the drawing order.

What's wrong with the code below?

#include <windows.h>

#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <GL/glut.h>

#include <cmath>

#pragma comment(lib, "opengl32.lib")
#pragma comment(lib, "glu32.lib")

int angle = 0;

void oglDraw()
{
    angle += 360;
    angle %= 360;
    float fAngle = angle / (180 / 3.14159);

    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();

    gluPerspective(90, 1, 0, 10);
    gluLookAt(0, 0, -1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0);

    float yFactor = 1;
    float zFactor = 1; 
    float y = yFactor * sin(fAngle);
    float z = 1 + zFactor - cos(fAngle) * zFactor;

    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); 

    glClearColor(1, 0, 0, 1);

    glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT, GL_FILL);

    glBegin(GL_POLYGON);
    glColor4f(0, 0, 1, 1);
    glVertex3f(-1.0, y-1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(+1.0, y-1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(+1.0, y+1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(-1.0, y+1.0, z);
    glEnd();

    fAngle = (180 - angle) / (180 / 3.14159);
    y = -yFactor * sin(fAngle);
    z = 1 + zFactor - cos(fAngle) * zFactor;

    glBegin(GL_POLYGON);
    glColor4f(0, 1, 0, 1);
    glVertex3f(-1.0, y-1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(+1.0, y-1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(+1.0, y+1.0, z);
    glVertex3f(-1.0, y+1.0, z);
    glEnd();

    glFlush();
    glutSwapBuffers();
}
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

void oglKeyboard(byte ch, int x, int y)
{
    if(ch == 'z')
    {
        angle++;

        glutPostRedisplay();

    }
    else
    if(ch == 'a')
    {
        angle--;

        glutPostRedisplay();
    }
}
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    glutInit(&argc, argv);

    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_RGB | GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_DEPTH );
    glutInitWindowSize(1024, 768);
    glutCreateWindow("OGL test");
    gluOrtho2D(0, 1024, 768, 0);

    glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
    glutDisplayFunc(oglDraw);
    glutKeyboardFunc(oglKeyboard);

    glutMainLoop();
}
share|improve this question
    
unrelated comment: You should use gluLookAt (which configures your view (camera position and direction)) on the modelview matrix and not the projection matrix. The projection matrix is only for things like gluPerspective, glFrustum and glOrtho, which configure your, well, projection (camera lens). –  Christian Rau May 23 '11 at 14:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pass something greater than zero for gluPerspective()'s zNear:

gluPerspective(90, 1, 0.1, 10);
share|improve this answer
    
Absolutely right! Thanks, I've been tearing my hair for the past few hours!!!! –  rep_movsd Jul 23 '10 at 19:57
    
@rep_movsd: Thank you for posting a complete, minimal, easy-to-compile program demonstrating the problem. That always makes this sort of thing much easier! :) –  genpfault Jul 23 '10 at 20:18
2  
This is a good reference on picking the right values for near and far z-buffer planes: sjbaker.org/steve/omniv/love_your_z_buffer.html –  Carlos Scheidegger Jul 24 '10 at 5:59

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