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Are there any gems able to parse XLS and XLSX files? I've found Spreadsheet and ParseExcel, but they both don't understand XLSX format :( Any ideas?

Thank you.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Just found roo, that might do the job - works for my requirements, reading a basic spreadsheet.

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8  
roo certainly works, but it's frustratingly un-Ruby-like and (for me, anyway) very surprising: not being able to iterate over rows using each? not being able to iterate over sheets? a notion of a "default sheet" followed by access to cells through the workbook object? –  M. Anthony Aiello Jan 30 '12 at 22:19
4  
It took me a while to find, but this now-official roo fork, which you have to explicitly pin, fixes my complaints about roo. It has #each, #to_a, reasonable sheet access, and doesn't pollute the global namespace with Spreadsheet by requiring ruby-spreadsheet. –  woahdae Jan 9 '13 at 22:46
    
@woahdae Awesome! It'd be great to see an example with these new features. Is there any documentation available? I'm specifically interested in being able to iterate through each row of each worksheet of a workbook. –  Anconia Jan 12 '13 at 15:40
    
The README of that fork has an extra section about what is new in the fork. However, after implementing an xlsx upload requiring good typecasting, I found that roo typecasting had much to be desired. It choked when trying to parse "2" (formatted as a number) as a date. I wrote my own parser that I like much better, I'll upload it to github tonight and get back to you. –  woahdae Jan 14 '13 at 21:59
2  
rubygems.org/gems/simple_xlsx_reader –  woahdae Jan 16 '13 at 17:21
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The roo gem works great for Excel (.xls and .xlsx) and it's being actively developed.

I agree the syntax is not great nor ruby-like. But that can be easily achieved with something like:

class Spreadsheet
  def initialize(file_path)
    @xls = Roo::Spreadsheet.open(file_path)
  end

  def each_sheet
    @xls.sheets.each do |sheet|
      @xls.default_sheet = sheet
      yield sheet
    end
  end

  def each_row
    0.upto(@xls.last_row) do |index|
      yield @xls.row(index)
    end
  end

  def each_column
    0.upto(@xls.last_column) do |index|
      yield @xls.column(index)
    end
  end
end
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Careful with this naming convention - Spreadsheet is an existing constant referring to a module: Spreadsheet.class # => Module Renaming the class to something like "Roobook" solves this issue. However, great work! –  Anconia Dec 30 '12 at 18:10
1  
Latest roo (on the empact fork you point to) doesn't pollute the namespace, and comes with #each and such. Finally! yay empact. –  woahdae Jan 9 '13 at 22:47
    
Roo gem is terrible with large files. Opening a 5MB XLSx file can take 30-60 seconds which is just does not make any sense. –  Yuri Omelchuk Jan 9 at 14:53
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If you're looking for more modern libraries, take a look at Spreadsheet: http://spreadsheet.rubyforge.org/GUIDE_txt.html. I can't tell if it supports XLSX files, but considering that it is actively developed, I'm guessing it does (I'm not on Windows, or with Office, so I can't test).

At this point, it looks like roo is a good option again. It supports XLSX, allows (some) iteration by just using times with cell access. I admit, it's not pretty though.

Also, RubyXL can now give you a sort of iteration using their extract_data method, which gives you a 2d array of data, which can be easily iterated over.

Alternatively, if you're trying to work with XLSX files on Windows, you can use Ruby's Win32OLE library that allows you to interface with OLE objects, like the ones provided by Word and Excel. With it, you can choose not to display Excel, load your XLSX file, and access it through it. I'm not sure if it supports iteration, however, I don't think it would be too hard to build around the supplied methods, as it is the full Microsoft OLE API for Excel. Here's the documentation: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/222101 Here's the gem: http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.3/libdoc/win32ole/rdoc/WIN32OLE.html

Again, the options don't look much better, but there isn't much else out there, I'm afraid. it's hard to parse a file format that is a black box. And those few who managed to break it didn't do it that visibly. Google Docs is closed source, and LibreOffice is thousands of lines of harry C++.

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Very helpful info! I'm currently building an excel crawler and having fits with it (stackoverflow.com/questions/14044357/…). I've given up on roo as iteration is rather painful. However, I'm anxious to try extract_data with RubyXL. –  Anconia Dec 26 '12 at 20:44
    
@Anconia: glad it helped. Thanks for the upvote. –  Linuxios Dec 26 '12 at 22:17
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I've been working heavily with both Spreadsheet and rubyXL these past couple weeks and I must say that both are great tools. However, one area that both suffer is the lack of examples on actually implementing anything useful. Currently I'm building a crawler and using rubyXL to parse xlsx files and Spreadsheet for anything xls. I hope the code below can serve as a helpful example and show just how effective these tools can be.

require 'find'
require 'rubyXL'

count = 0

Find.find('/Users/Anconia/crawler/') do |file|             # begin iteration of each file of a specified directory
  if file =~ /\b.xlsx$\b/                                  # check if file is xlsx format
    workbook = RubyXL::Parser.parse(file).worksheets       # creates an object containing all worksheets of an excel workbook
    workbook.each do |worksheet|                           # begin iteration over each worksheet
      data = worksheet.extract_data.to_s                   # extract data of a given worksheet - must be converted to a string in order to match a regex
      if data =~ /regex/
        puts file
        count += 1
      end      
    end
  end
end

puts "#{count} files were found"

require 'find'
require 'spreadsheet'
Spreadsheet.client_encoding = 'UTF-8'

count = 0

Find.find('/Users/Anconia/crawler/') do |file|             # begin iteration of each file of a specified directory
  if file =~ /\b.xls$\b/                                   # check if a given file is xls format
    workbook =  Spreadsheet.open(file).worksheets          # creates an object containing all worksheets of an excel workbook
    workbook.each do |worksheet|                           # begin iteration over each worksheet
      worksheet.each do |row|                              # begin iteration over each row of a worksheet
        if row.to_s =~ /regex/                             # rows must be converted to strings in order to match the regex
          puts file
          count += 1
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

puts "#{count} files were found"
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How do I iterate over rows?? Possible? –  Some_other_guy Jul 7 at 7:51
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The rubyXL gem parses XLSX files beautifully.

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rubyXL (like roo, above) also gets weird when you actually get around to accessing the data in a worksheet. Is there something fundamental about the data model for a spreadsheet that iteration over rows and columns cannot be simply provided? –  M. Anthony Aiello Jan 30 '12 at 22:25
4  
RubyXL is a mess. I do not recommend it. –  benzado Nov 8 '12 at 19:58
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I couldn't find a satisfactory xlsx parser. RubyXL doesn't do date typecasting, Roo tried to typecast a number as a date, and both are a mess both in api and code.

So, I wrote simple_xlsx_reader. You'd have to use something else for xls, though, so maybe it's not the full answer you're looking for.

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looking forward to giving this a go. Hope to see more features down the road. Great start! –  Anconia Jan 18 '13 at 4:23
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The RemoteTable library uses roo internally. It makes it easy to read spreadsheets of different formats (XLS, XLSX, CSV, etc. possibly remote, possibly stored inside a zip, gz, etc.):

require 'remote_table'
r = RemoteTable.new 'http://www.fueleconomy.gov/FEG/epadata/02data.zip', :filename => 'guide_jan28.xls'
r.each do |row|
  puts row.inspect
end

Output:

{"Class"=>"TWO SEATERS", "Manufacturer"=>"ACURA", "carline name"=>"NSX", "displ"=>"3.0", "cyl"=>"6.0", "trans"=>"Auto(S4)", "drv"=>"R", "bidx"=>"60.0", "cty"=>"17.0", "hwy"=>"24.0", "cmb"=>"20.0", "ucty"=>"19.1342", "uhwy"=>"30.2", "ucmb"=>"22.9121", "fl"=>"P", "G"=>"", "T"=>"", "S"=>"", "2pv"=>"", "2lv"=>"", "4pv"=>"", "4lv"=>"", "hpv"=>"", "hlv"=>"", "fcost"=>"1238.0", "eng dscr"=>"DOHC-VTEC", "trans dscr"=>"2MODE", "vpc"=>"4.0", "cls"=>"1.0"}
{"Class"=>"TWO SEATERS", "Manufacturer"=>"ACURA", "carline name"=>"NSX", "displ"=>"3.2", "cyl"=>"6.0", "trans"=>"Manual(M6)", "drv"=>"R", "bidx"=>"65.0", "cty"=>"17.0", "hwy"=>"24.0", "cmb"=>"19.0", "ucty"=>"18.7", "uhwy"=>"30.4", "ucmb"=>"22.6171", "fl"=>"P", "G"=>"", "T"=>"", "S"=>"", "2pv"=>"", "2lv"=>"", "4pv"=>"", "4lv"=>"", "hpv"=>"", "hlv"=>"", "fcost"=>"1302.0", "eng dscr"=>"DOHC-VTEC", "trans dscr"=>"", "vpc"=>"4.0", "cls"=>"1.0"}
{"Class"=>"TWO SEATERS", "Manufacturer"=>"ASTON MARTIN", "carline name"=>"ASTON MARTIN VANQUISH", "displ"=>"5.9", "cyl"=>"12.0", "trans"=>"Auto(S6)", "drv"=>"R", "bidx"=>"1.0", "cty"=>"12.0", "hwy"=>"19.0", "cmb"=>"14.0", "ucty"=>"13.55", "uhwy"=>"24.7", "ucmb"=>"17.015", "fl"=>"P", "G"=>"G", "T"=>"", "S"=>"", "2pv"=>"", "2lv"=>"", "4pv"=>"", "4lv"=>"", "hpv"=>"", "hlv"=>"", "fcost"=>"1651.0", "eng dscr"=>"GUZZLER", "trans dscr"=>"CLKUP", "vpc"=>"4.0", "cls"=>"1.0"}
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I'm using creek which uses nokogiri. It is fast. Used 8.3 seconds on a 21x11250 xlsx table on my Macbook Air. Got it to work on ruby 1.9.3+. The output format for each row is a hash of row and column name to cell content: {"A1"=>"a cell", "B1"=>"another cell"} The hash makes no guarantee that the keys will be in the original column order. https://github.com/pythonicrubyist/creek

dullard is another great one that uses nokogiri. It is super fast. Used 6.7 seconds on a 21x11250 xlsx table on my Macbook Air. Got it to work on ruby 2.0.0+. The output format for each row is an array: ["a cell", "another cell"] https://github.com/thirtyseven/dullard

simple_xlsx_reader which has been mentioned is great, a bit slow. Used 91 seconds on a 21x11250 xlsx table on my Macbook Air. Got it to work on ruby 1.9.3+. The output format for each row is an array: ["a cell", "another cell"] https://github.com/woahdae/simple_xlsx_reader

Another interesting one is oxcelix. It uses ox's SAX parser which supposedly faster than both nokogiri's DOM and SAX parser. It supposedly outputs a Matrix. I could not get it to work. Also, there were some dependency issues with rubyzip. Would not recommend it.

In conclusion, if using a ruby version lower than 2.0.0, use creek. If using ruby 2.0.0+, use dullard because it's faster and retains the table column order.

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