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Someone within my organization has started pushing for us to pilot the CMU SEI's TSP process (see website here). I have an instinctual aversion to any attempts to cure software development illnesses with alphabet soup, but I would like to know if anyone has experience with this process and can provide tangible facts.

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2 Answers 2

I used to be a fan of SEI's CMM. I even read Watts Humphrey's "Managing the Software Process" book cover to cover. I haven't used TSP but I suspect it has similar strenghts and weaknesses as the other software processes.

Definitely read about it and what they claim it can do and how to implement it, but be vigilant about keeping your software process small and flexible. You need one, but be careful about taking processes from someone else.

good luck.

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Ah, I am somewhat more familiar with CMM so this is a good point for comparison. I am definitely skeptical of any "one size fits all" process. –  Luke Dec 1 '08 at 22:17
    
how big is your company/organization and what are the typical scopes of the projects? –  Tim Dec 1 '08 at 22:52
    
CMM is used to differentiate Indian companies, and to qualify to supply the DoD. Other than that, it's worthless. –  Andrew Johnson Aug 25 '09 at 21:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

We've been using this process for a few months now and I'm not particularly impressed. This process is only suitable for a strict command and control style of management where programmers are essentially bean counters. Most of the good parts of this process (size estimates rather than time estimates, self reviews, detailed plans, logging time against plans, and keeping a log of defects and errors for later review) can be implemented without throwing a bunch of money at SEI.

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