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Say I have:

(def s1 [1 2 3 4 5])
(def s2 [1 2 3 4 5])

For every x in s1, I want to multiply it with every y in s2.


To clarify, I basically want the Cartesian product, so I don't think map works here.

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1  
Just for fun, here are a few solutions in other languages. Erlang (and any other language with list comprehensions): [X * Y || X <- S1, Y <- S2] Ruby (1.8.7+): s1.product(s2).map {|x,y| x*y} –  Greg Campbell Jul 24 '10 at 14:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted
(for [x1 s1
      x2 s2]
  (* x1 x2))
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8  
It's... beautiful. sheds a tear –  brlafreniere Jul 23 '10 at 21:38
    
I'm very new to Clojure, and functional programming in general, even though I know what that does... it still feels awkward and hard to wrap my head around it. Can you describe what's happening there? –  brlafreniere Jul 23 '10 at 21:46
2  
Firstly, you can type (doc for) at a Clojure REPL to get a (hopefully) good description of what for does; if you find it comes short of your expectations, your experience could help in improving the docstring! Secondly, here's a short summary: for takes a binding vector and a single "body" expression. The binding vector comprises names of locals (x1 and x2 in the above) and sequence-producing expressions (s1 and s2). The body is evaluated once for each tuple of items in the Cartesian product of the seqs (here each (x1, x2) in the product of s1 and s2). –  Michał Marczyk Jul 23 '10 at 22:07
    
Fortunately, I did read the docs online for the for function, unfortunately it made my brain explode. –  brlafreniere Jul 23 '10 at 22:08
1  
See my answer for the java equivalent. Hopefully it helps you understand. –  dbyrne Jul 23 '10 at 22:13

Here is the java 1.5 (or newer) equivalent of Michal's code:

List<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();    

for(int x1 : s1) {
  for(int x2 : s2) {
    numbers.add(x1 * x2);
  }
}

The difference is that for loops in java don't return a sequence like they do in clojure, so you need to use a mutable ArrayList to construct the result.

Definitely not as pretty as the clojure version, but much better than what you would have had to do in Java 1.4.

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While solution using for is nicer, here is a map-only version if you have troubles understanding for:

(map #(map (partial * %) s2) s1)

for above expands to something similar, except it would use another anonymous function instead of partial, something like this:

(map (fn [x] (map (fn [y] (* x y)) s2)) s1)

or, neatly formated:

(map
  (fn [x]
    (map
      (fn [y]
        (* x y))
      s2))
  s1)
share|improve this answer
    
Upvote for the alternative. I wonder if it's faster. –  brlafreniere Jul 26 '10 at 5:27
    
BTW, to get behavior identical to for the first (outer) map should be replaced with mapcat. –  dimagog Jul 27 '10 at 3:00
    
@Blaine See for yourself :-) : (use 'clojure.pprint) (set-pprint-dispatch code-dispatch) (pprint (macroexpand '(for [x1 s1 x2 s2] (* x1 x2)))) –  dimagog Jul 27 '10 at 3:13

A simple, visual demonstration of the basic functionality of for:

user=> (pprint 
         (for [tens (range 10) 
               ones (range 10)]
           [tens ones]))
([0 0]
 [0 1]
 [0 2]
 [0 3]
 [0 4]
 [0 5]
 [0 6]
 [0 7]
 [0 8]
 [0 9]
 [1 0]
 [1 1]
 [1 2]
 [1 3]
 [1 4]
 [1 5]
 [1 6]
 [1 7]
 [1 8]
 [1 9]
 [2 0]
 [2 1]
 [2 2]
 [2 3]
 [2 4]
 [2 5]
 [2 6]
 [2 7]
 [2 8]
 [2 9]
 [3 0]
 [3 1]
 [3 2]
 [3 3]
 [3 4]
 [3 5]
 [3 6]
 [3 7]
 [3 8]
 [3 9]
 [4 0]
 [4 1]
 [4 2]
 [4 3]
 [4 4]
 [4 5]
 [4 6]
 [4 7]
 [4 8]
 [4 9]
 [5 0]
 [5 1]
 [5 2]
 [5 3]
 [5 4]
 [5 5]
 [5 6]
 [5 7]
 [5 8]
 [5 9]
 [6 0]
 [6 1]
 [6 2]
 [6 3]
 [6 4]
 [6 5]
 [6 6]
 [6 7]
 [6 8]
 [6 9]
 [7 0]
 [7 1]
 [7 2]
 [7 3]
 [7 4]
 [7 5]
 [7 6]
 [7 7]
 [7 8]
 [7 9]
 [8 0]
 [8 1]
 [8 2]
 [8 3]
 [8 4]
 [8 5]
 [8 6]
 [8 7]
 [8 8]
 [8 9]
 [9 0]
 [9 1]
 [9 2]
 [9 3]
 [9 4]
 [9 5]
 [9 6]
 [9 7]
 [9 8]
 [9 9])
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As simple as it can get:

(map * '(1 2) '(3 4))

will yield:

(3 8)
share|improve this answer
    
Mmh... not quite what I was looking for. It matches my English description, but I should have said from the start that I was looking for the Cartesian product of two sets. I just didn't know what it was called. –  brlafreniere Jul 27 '10 at 4:15
    
Oops, indeed, I should have ready the answers more carefully. –  Jawher Jul 27 '10 at 17:21

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