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When an ASPX page needs to make a call to a potentially long-running operation (lengthy DB query, call to a remote webservice, etc.), I use RegisterAsyncTask, so the IIS worker thread is returned to the pool, rather than being tied up for the duration of the long-running operation.

However ASMX webservices don't have a RegisterAsyncTask function. When an ASMX webservice needs to call a potentially long-running operation, how can I implement the same behavior as RegisterAsyncTask?

Note: the ASMX webservice is implemented as a script-service: returning json to a direct jQuery/ajax call. Therefore, I cannot use the "BeginXXX" approach described by MSDN, since that implements the asynchronous behavior within the generated client-stub (which isn't used when calling the webservice directly via ajax).

EDIT: Adding source code: implemented the BeginXXX/EndXXX approach listed in John's answer. The synchronous "Parrot" function works fine. But the asynchronous "SlowParrot" function gives an internal server error: "Unknown web method SlowParrot"

WebService1.asmx:

// Test class implemented according to: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa480516.aspx
[WebService]
[ScriptService]
public class WebService1 : WebService
{
    // A normal, synchronous webMethod, to prove the overall webservice is working.
    [WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
    [ScriptMethod(ResponseFormat = ResponseFormat.Json)]
    public string Parrot(string key)
    {
        return key;
    }

    // Artificially-slow function (uses Thread.Sleep).
    public string SleepyParrot(string key)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
        return key;
    }

    // Delegate matching our slow-running function.
    public delegate string SleepyParrotStub(string key);

    // State object to hold the delegate.
    public class MyState
    {
        public SleepyParrotStub Stub;
    }

    // Asynchronous web method, which should be accessible via: "Webservice1.asmx/SlowParrot".
    [WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
    [ScriptMethod(ResponseFormat = ResponseFormat.Json)]
    public IAsyncResult BeginSlowParrot(string key, AsyncCallback callback, object asyncState)
    {
        SleepyParrotStub stub = new SleepyParrotStub(SleepyParrot);
        MyState ms = new MyState();
        ms.Stub = stub;
        return stub.BeginInvoke(key, callback, ms);
    }

    // Asynchronous web method, which should be accessible via: "Webservice1.asmx/SlowParrot".
    [WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
    [ScriptMethod(ResponseFormat = ResponseFormat.Json)]
    public string EndSlowParrot(IAsyncResult result)
    {
        MyState ms = (MyState)result.AsyncState;
        return ms.Stub.EndInvoke(result);
    }
}

WebForm1.aspx:

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="WebForm1.aspx.cs" Inherits="WebApplication1.WebForm1" %>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/jquery-1.4.2.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/json2.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function showHelloWorld() {
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "WebService1.asmx/Parrot",
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
                data: '{"key":"Hello World"}',
                success: myCallback,
                error: function(response) {
                    alert(response.statusText);
                }
            });
        }

        function showSomethingElse() {
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "WebService1.asmx/SlowParrot",
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
                data: '{"key":"something else"}',
                success: myCallback,
                error: function(response) {
                    alert(response.statusText);
                }
            });
        }

        function myCallback(response) {
            $("#myDiv").html(response.d);
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div id="myDiv"></div>
    <p><a href="javascript: showHelloWorld();">show hello world</a> | <a href="javascript: showSomethingElse();">show something else</a></p>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
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2 Answers 2

You need to make clear decision where do you want async invocation to happen and know exactly what runs where and which code gets generated. There's no such thing as magic :-)

Only functions with [WebMethod] are ever visible as web methods - with the exact names you gave them. So at the very least you'd have to invoke BeginSlowParrot and EndSlowParot but that wouldn't help you much since calling 1st will go to server Foo1 and the 2nd to server Foo2 in a web farm, not to mention that even with the same server (say sticky IP) you'd have to test if the actual object behind IAsyncResult is replayable from a JSON serialization (JSON is type-poor compared to XML so to speak). Even if it is, that still only works in a signle server scenario.

.NET libs know how to autogen proxy methods by following Begin/End as naming convention when they see them in a WSDL but it's still 2 actual web methods - do WebService1.asmx?WDSL from IE and you'see exactly what's declared.

If you want to invoke something asynchronously from the client on multiple threads (they are in IE not the server) then you need extra JavaScript code to do that - web methods themselves remain as they were. You'll need 2nd hidden DIV on the client that will handle only these slow calls and the 3rd and 4th - one for every additional kind of async interaction you want.

So my best guess is that you first need to confirm that 2 $ajax(...) calls are serialized indeed (you need 2 slow and different web methods to confirm that - each returning different value) and if so, you need to dig into included .js that contains $ajax and see what's going on there). It might be protecting itself from ppl trying to do full miltithreading in a browser and then complain that their data got damaged :-)

If you want something async on the server - that has to remain on that server - your client will still have to wait the response of one invocation it did but the web method code can spawn 5 async calls to run it's stuff, wait for them to finish, collect and merge results and then send them back.

Oh and if you want to copy something from an ASPX page you need to dig through the source generated for it (in a browser) and also know which things in your C# code generte what. ASP.NET tries very hard to hide that from you and confuse you as much as possible. It was done for ppl who hate client-server programming and want to pretend they are writing a local Windows app. So whatever you see there is totally private API and you have to look at generated page (tags and js code and includes) in you want to see what's going on.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed response - apologies if the original question wasn't clear enough as to what I'm looking for. I want the same behavior within ASMX that I can get within ASPX by using RegisterAsyncTask: the browser makes one and only one call to the webserver; from the browser's perspective, the call is synchronous. Within the page lifecycle (or webservice call), the .NET engine itself recognizes AsyncTasks, and manages launching them, waiting for responses, and freeing up the worker thread during that interim time. –  mikemanne Aug 3 '10 at 14:29
    
OK, that simplifies the problem a lot - then just keep one normnal web method (no Begin/End stuff) and fire your own asyncs. You can invoke any delegate as async and just keep the handle to check or wait on completition latter (meaning you don't have to manage threads). Use them sparingly though since threads for async delegates get spawn on top of the thread pool that IIS manages. If you are curious you can also look at these two methods of the Page class you used (in Reflector) to se what they do. Chances are that they just do equivalent of async delegate call as well. –  ZXX Aug 3 '10 at 23:04
    
I've looked into that, but I don't believe it gets me what I want: while it's true my delegates would each run in their own thread, my main thread is still committed while I'm waiting on them - I don't believe IIS re-claims it for use by other requests while waiting for the async calls. Regarding using reflection on the Page class: that will get me the function signatures, but not the function's implementation, so I don't think I can use it to decompile the implementation of Page. –  mikemanne Aug 4 '10 at 13:29
    
Believe you me :-) it's a good thing that IIS leaves your main thread waiting. Ideally you shouldn;t even be spawning any threads that are not controlled by IIS since IIS has just about the most sophisticated thread pool management this side of the black hole :-) I've read Page methods in Refelctor many times and you don't do that in order to exactly copy and paste the code but to check how it works. In this case you only need to check if these two functions also end up firing independent async calls or maybe they use a few tricks to send a processing object to IIS-managed thread-pool. –  ZXX Aug 4 '10 at 14:30
    
If that's that's what they do then you may want to copy just bits and pieces that do that and make yourself a class or two to pack it nicely, but if they just fire async delegates at the end of the day than you can just do the same -- following the intention, not necessarily the identical code. –  ZXX Aug 4 '10 at 14:32

See "Asynchronous XML Web Service Methods" in the MSDN documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
Unless I'm reading it wrong, the article you linked is the same technique as the MSDN article I referenced in the original question. That approach only works when the caller is using the MS-generated client-proxy class - it doesn't work when the webservice is implemented as json-formatted ScriptService/ScriptMethod and called directly from the browser using standard (non-MS-generated) javascript and jQuery. Am I misunderstanding the article you linked? Or is there a better approach, which works when the client is using "standard" js/ajax/jquery? –  mikemanne Jul 26 '10 at 14:17
    
@mike: You totally misunderstood. The article I linked is entirely server-side, and works regardless of the client. –  John Saunders Jul 26 '10 at 14:25
    
I really appreciate your contributions to this site! Perhaps you can help me understand this better. When I implement the webservice as described in that article (BeginFoo(), EndFoo()), and try to hit the service (MyService.asmx/Foo), I get an error indicating that Foo() is not a recognized webservice method (not surprising, since I'm using simple jquery, not the generated client-proxy class). Should I instead be calling MyService.asmx/BeginFoo using jQuery, then following it up with a second call to MyService.asmx/EndFoo? –  mikemanne Jul 26 '10 at 14:48
2  
@mike: I've never used the ScriptService support. I always assumed it just worked the same as for a SOAP service, but just used JSON. Maybe it doesn't work that way. In that case, it would be time to move to WCF, where I strongly suspect that contract and implementation are kept separate. –  John Saunders Jul 26 '10 at 17:46

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