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How do you change the size of figure drawn with matplotlib?

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This might help –  Blairg23 May 28 at 6:20

7 Answers 7

figure tells you the call signature:

figure(num=None, figsize=(8, 6), dpi=80, facecolor='w', edgecolor='k')

So figure(figsize=(1,1)) creates an inch-by-inch image, which will be 80-by-80 pixels unless you also give a different dpi argument.

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13  
If you've already got the figure created, say it's 'figure 1' (that's the default one when you're using pyplot), you can use figure(num=1, figsize=(8, 6), ...) to change it's size etc. If you're using pyplot/pylab and show() to create a popup window, you need to call figure(num=1,...) before you plot anything - pyplot/pylab creates a figure as soon as you draw something, and the size of the popup appears to be fixed at this point. –  drevicko Jul 2 '13 at 23:31

If you've already got the figure created you can quickly do this:

fig = matplotlib.pyplot.gcf()
fig.set_size_inches(18.5,10.5)
fig.savefig('test2png.png',dpi=100)
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Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for. –  Noah Sussman Oct 2 '12 at 19:49
    
Solved me a problem with imshow, now I'm using this code just after eliminating the space around the plotting area with plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.0, right=1.0, bottom=0.0, top=1.0). –  heltonbiker Nov 26 '12 at 14:21
3  
Note that if you use pyplot.show() to see the graph in a popup window, set_size_inches() does NOT change the size of the window containing your graph, at least on Ubuntu with Qt4Agg, TkAgg and GTK3Agg - presumably this is true in other OS's/backends too.. @Jouni's answer however does change the windows size if you call figure(num=1,figsize=(18,10),...) before you plot anything. –  drevicko Jul 2 '13 at 23:29

The following seems to work:

from pylab import *
rcParams['figure.figsize'] = 5, 10

This makes the figure's width 5 inches, and its height 10 inches.

The Figure class then uses this as the default value for one of its arguments.

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This is the most reliable one (works in linux, mac, windows,...). Put this top of your file and it just works. figure.set_size, figure(figsize=(x,y)) etc do not work correctly in every system. –  Juha Mar 18 '13 at 14:31
    
Yes, none of the other solutions worked for my Windows 7 machine. This one is the main solution if 'one size fits all' images. –  Zhubarb Sep 11 '13 at 14:17
1  
This also works nicely at the top of a iPython notebook, which (given --pylab=inline) has rcParams already imported at the top level. –  nealmcb Dec 10 '13 at 20:57

The first link in Google for 'matplotlib figure size' is AdjustingImageSize (google cache of the page: http://74.125.77.132/search?q=cache:http://www.scipy.org/Cookbook/Matplotlib/AdjustingImageSize).

Here's a test script from the above page. It creates test[1-3].png files of different sizes of the same image:

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""
This is a small demo file that helps teach how to adjust figure sizes
for matplotlib

"""

import matplotlib
print "using MPL version:", matplotlib.__version__
matplotlib.use("WXAgg") # do this before pylab so you don'tget the default back end.

import pylab
import matplotlib.numerix as N

# Generate and plot some simple data:
x = N.arange(0, 2*N.pi, 0.1)
y = N.sin(x)

pylab.plot(x,y)
F = pylab.gcf()

# Now check everything with the defaults:
DPI = F.get_dpi()
print "DPI:", DPI
DefaultSize = F.get_size_inches()
print "Default size in Inches", DefaultSize
print "Which should result in a %i x %i Image"%(DPI*DefaultSize[0], DPI*DefaultSize[1])
# the default is 100dpi for savefig:
F.savefig("test1.png")
# this gives me a 797 x 566 pixel image, which is about 100 DPI

# Now make the image twice as big, while keeping the fonts and all the
# same size
F.set_size_inches( (DefaultSize[0]*2, DefaultSize[1]*2) )
Size = F.get_size_inches()
print "Size in Inches", Size
F.savefig("test2.png")
# this results in a 1595x1132 image

# Now make the image twice as big, making all the fonts and lines
# bigger too.

F.set_size_inches( DefaultSize )# resetthe size
Size = F.get_size_inches()
print "Size in Inches", Size
F.savefig("test3.png", dpi = (200)) # change the dpi
# this also results in a 1595x1132 image, but the fonts are larger.

Output:

using MPL version: 0.98.1
DPI: 80
Default size in Inches [ 8.  6.]
Which should result in a 640 x 480 Image
Size in Inches [ 16.  12.]
Size in Inches [ 16.  12.]

Two notes:

  1. The module comments and the actual output differ.

  2. This answer allows easily to combine all three images in one image file to see the difference in sizes.

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21  
4 years later 'matplotlib figure size' gave me this post, mate :] –  Janusz Lenar Aug 29 '12 at 15:09

Try commenting out the fig = ... line

%matplotlib inline
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

N = 50
x = np.random.rand(N)
y = np.random.rand(N)
area = np.pi * (15 * np.random.rand(N))**2

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(18, 18))
plt.scatter(x, y, s=area, alpha=0.5)
plt.show()
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Please try a simple code as following:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
plt.figure(figsize=(1,1))
x = [1,2,3]
plt.plot(x, x)
plt.show

You need to set the figure size before you plot.

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4  
What does this add to a 5 year old question, that the other 6 answers don't cover? –  Andy Jun 6 at 3:43

This works well for me:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
F = gcf()
Size = F.get_size_inches()
F.set_size_inches(Size[0]*2, Size[1]*2, forward=True)#Set forward to True to resize window along with plot in figure.
plt.show() #or plt.imshow(z_array) if using an animation, where z_array is a matrix or numpy array

This might also help: http://matplotlib.1069221.n5.nabble.com/Resizing-figure-windows-td11424.html

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