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Why does Android provide 2 interfaces for serializing objects? Do Serializable objects interopt with Android Binder and AIDL files?

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6 Answers 6

Serializable is a standard Java interface. You simply mark a class Serializable by implemnting the interface, and Java will automatically serialize it in certain situations.

Parcelable is an Android specific interface where you implement the serialization yourself. It was created to be far more efficient that Serializable, and to get around some problems with the default Java serialization scheme.

I believe that Binder and AIDL work with Parcelable objects.

However, you can use Serializable objects in Intents.

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how do I serialize a Parcelable object? How do I make it persistent? –  Hades Jul 12 '11 at 11:43
    
@Haded Get the contents of the objects state and store it in a file or SQLLite database. Seriliasing is useful for making objects transferable between different components in android or different applications altogether. –  jonney Apr 4 '13 at 23:38
    
This is a great explanation. I also noticed this: "Parcel is not a general-purpose serialization mechanism. This class (and the corresponding Parcelable API for placing arbitrary objects into a Parcel) is designed as a high-performance IPC transport. As such, it is not appropriate to place any Parcel data in to persistent storage: changes in the underlying implementation of any of the data in the Parcel can render older data unreadable." developer.android.com/reference/android/os/Parcel.html –  Zhisheng Mar 11 at 19:12

In Android we know that we cannot just pass objects to activities. The objects must be either implements Serializable or Parcelable interface to do this.

Serializable

Serializable is a standard Java interface. You can just implement Serializable interface and add override methods.The problem with this approach is that reflection is used and it is a slow process. This method create a lot of temporary objects and cause quite a bit of garbage collection. Serializable interface is easier to implement.

Look at the example below (Serializable)

//MyObjects Serializable class

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.TreeMap;

import android.os.Parcel;
import android.os.Parcelable;

public class MyObjects implements Serializable {

private String name;
private int age;

public ArrayList<String> address;

public MyObjects(String name, int age, ArrayList<String> address) {
    super();
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
    this.address = address;
}

public ArrayList<String> getAddress() {
    if (!(address == null))
        return address;
    else
        return new ArrayList<String>();
}

public String getName() {
    return name;

}

public String getAge() {
    return age;
}

}



//MyObjects instance
MyObjects mObjects = new MyObjects("name","age","Address array here");

//Passing MyObjects instance via intent
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putExtra("UniqueKey", mObjects);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
MyObjects workorder = (MyObjects) mIntent.getSerializableExtra("UniqueKey");

Parcelable

Parcelable process is much faster than serializable. One of the reasons for this is that we are being explicit about the serialization process instead of using reflection to infer it. It also stands to reason that the code has been heavily optimized for this purpose.

Look at the example below (Parcelable)

//MyObjects Parcelable class

import java.util.ArrayList;

import android.os.Parcel;
import android.os.Parcelable;

public class MyObjects implements Parcelable {

private int age;
private String name;

private ArrayList<String> address;

public MyObjects(String name, int age, ArrayList<String> address) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
    this.address = address;

}

public MyObjects(Parcel source) {
    age = source.readInt();
    name = source.readString();
    address = source.createStringArrayList();
}

@Override
public int describeContents() {
    return 0;
}

@Override
public void writeToParcel(Parcel dest, int flags) {
    dest.writeInt(age);
    dest.writeString(name);
    dest.writeStringList(address);

}

public int getAge() {
    return age;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public ArrayList<String> getAddress() {
    if (!(address == null))
        return address;
    else
        return new ArrayList<String>();
}

public static final Creator<MyObjects> CREATOR = new Creator<MyObjects>() {
    @Override
    public MyObjects[] newArray(int size) {
        return new MyObjects[size];
    }

    @Override
    public MyObjects createFromParcel(Parcel source) {
        return new MyObjects(source);
    }
};

}





MyObjects mObjects = new MyObjects("name","age","Address array here");

//Passing MyOjects instance
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putExtra("UniqueKey", mObjects);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
MyObjects workorder = (MyObjects) mIntent.getParcelable("UniqueKey");




//You can pass Arraylist of Parceble obect as below

//Array of MyObjects
ArrayList<MyObjects> mUsers;

//Passing MyOjects instance
Intent mIntent = new Intent(FromActivity.this, ToActivity.class);
mIntent.putParcelableArrayListExtra("UniqueKey", mUsers);
startActivity(mIntent);


//Getting MyObjects instance
Intent mIntent = getIntent();
ArrayList<MyObjects> mUsers = mIntent.getParcelableArrayList("UniqueKey");

Conclusion.

  1. Parcelable is faster than serializable interface
  2. Parcelable interface takes more time for implemetation compared to serializable interface
  3. serializable interface is easier to implement
  4. serializable interface create a lot of temporary objects and cause quite a bit of garbage collection
  5. Parcelable array can be pass via Intent in android
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If you want to be a good citizen, take the extra time to implement Parcelable since it will perform 10 times faster and use less resources.

However, in most cases, the slowness of Serializable won’t be noticeable. Feel free to use it but remember that serialization is an expensive operation so keep it to a minimum.

If you are trying to pass a list with thousands of serialized objects, it is possible that the whole process will take more than a second. It can make transitions or rotation from portrait to lanscape feel very sluggish.

Source to this point: http://www.developerphil.com/parcelable-vs-serializable/

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thanks a lot @codercat for a wonderful article and a detailed performance analysis between Serializable and Parcelable –  Utkarsh Mankad Mar 30 at 5:07

I'm actually going to be the one guy advocating for the Serializable. The speed difference is not so drastic any more since the devices are far better than several years ago and also there are other, more subtle differences. See my blog post on the issue for more info.

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you can use the serializable objects in the intents but at the time of making serialize a Parcelable object it can a give a serious exception like NotSerializableException. Is it not recommended using serializable with Parcelable . So it is better to extends Parcelable with the object that you want to use with bundle and intents. As this Parcelable is android specific so it doesn't have any side effects. :)

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Parcelable much faster than serializable with Binder, because serializable use reflection and cause many GC. Parcelable is design to optimize to pass object.

Here's link to reference. http://www.developerphil.com/parcelable-vs-serializable/

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