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I have the following piece of code which doesn't compile when I try to instance something like CommandGlobal<int> because it tries to override virtual void Execute() const =0; with a function which returns int. It gives a non-covariance error.

class CommandBase
{
public:
    virtual void Execute() const =0;
};

template<class T>
struct CommandGlobal : CommandBase
{
    typedef boost::function<T ()> Command;
    Command comm;

    virtual T Execute() const
    {
        return comm();
    }
};

template<class T>
struct CommandMemberFunction : CommandBase
{
    typedef boost::function<T (int, std::string)> Command;
    Command comm;
    int entityid;
    std::string mfid;

    virtual T Execute() const
    {
        return comm(entityid, mfid);
    }
}; 

I have asked this question before and recieved an answer which I couldn't figure out exactly how to implement. The answer given is as follows:

Quick & dirty answer: pass to Execute a reference to the result type as a void*, and make Execute private. Then wrap Execute in a non-virtual wrapper which returns T by value and does the cast.

Could anyone clarify this answer with a bit of code. I would appreciate this greatly.

Thanks all!

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? Your class templates cannot work (except for T = void) because the base class has a virtual function returning void. You can only override Execute() in a derived class by declaring a function with an identical signature, the signature cannot depend on the template parameter in the derived class templates. –  Charles Bailey Jul 24 '10 at 0:50
    
@Charles: Identity is not required, overloading functions are allowed to have covariant return type. –  Ben Voigt Jul 24 '10 at 1:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think he meant something like (a little bit simplified):


class CommandBase
{
private:
    virtual void* ExecuteMe() const =0;
};
template< class T > struct CommandGlobal : CommandBase { typedef boost::function Command; Command comm; T Execute() const { return ((T)(ExecuteMe())); } private: virtual void ExecuteMe(void*) const { return &(comm()); } }; template< class T> struct CommandMemberFunction : CommandBase { typedef boost::function Command; Command comm; int entityid; std::string mfid;
T Execute() const { return ((T)(ExecuteMe())); } private: virtual void* ExecuteMe() const { return (void*)&(comm(entityid, mfid)); } };

Although it's quite error-prone. I'd suggest that you redesign your base interface to have a common interface for T so your Execute() doesn't return void but instead IMyClass or something similar.

share|improve this answer

I can't figure out how you're going to use this hierarchy. If you are going to do something like this:

CommandBase * cb = new CommandGlobal<int>();

then what will you put in your code for ??type?? below:

??type?? result = cb->Execute();

And if your going to do this:

CommandGlobal<int> cg;
int result = cg.Execute();

then why bother with a base class?

At any rate, you might also look into having Execute return a Boost.Any instance, as that way both the base class and the subclasses would all be returning instances of the same type. Then you could any_cast the result to the right type at the call site, presuming you could figure out which actual subclass of CommandBase you had.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are right. I need to rethink my whole approach. Thanks for your input. –  Sebastian Edwards Jul 24 '10 at 5:48

You need a different name, try something like:

class CommandBase
{
public:
    virtual void Execute() const =0;
};

template<class T>
struct CommandGlobal : CommandBase
{
    typedef boost::function<T ()> Command;
    Command comm;

    virtual void Execute() const
    {
        ExecuteWithResult();
    }

    virtual T ExecuteWithResult() const
    {
        return comm();
    }
};
share|improve this answer

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