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I need to rotate a 64 bit value using 2 32 bit registers. Has anyone come across an efficient way of doing this?

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Can you use assembler, if so, are you on x86 or something else? – Seth Jul 24 '10 at 3:09
    
its an embedded system – giroy Jul 24 '10 at 3:13
    
Platform, compiler, etc? – zdav Jul 24 '10 at 3:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, a normal rotate can be implemented like this:

unsigned int rotate(unsigned int bits, unsigned int n) {
    return bits << n | (bits >> (32 - n));
}

So, here's a guess at a 64-bit implementation with 32-bit vars:

void bit_rotate_left_64(unsigned int hi, unsigned int lo, unsigned int n,
                        unsigned int *out_hi, unsigned int *out_lo) {
    unsigned int hi_shift, hi_rotated;
    unsigned int lo_shift, lo_rotated;

    hi_shift = hi << n;
    hi_rotated = hi >> (32 - n);

    lo_shift = lo << n;
    lo_rotated = lo >> (32 - n);

    *out_hi = hi_shift | lo_rotated;
    *out_lo = lo_shift | hi_rotated;
}

Basically, I'm just taking the rotated bits from the high word and OR-ing them with the low word, and vice-versa.

Here's a quick test:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { 
    /* watch the one move left */
    hi = 0;
    lo = 1;
    for (i = 0; i < 129; i++) {
        bit_rotate_left_64(hi, lo, 1, &hi, &lo);
        printf("Result: %.8x %.8x\n", hi, lo);
    }

    /* same as above, but the 0 moves left */
    hi = -1U;
    lo = 0xFFFFFFFF ^ 1;
    for (i = 0; i < 129; i++) {
        bit_rotate_left_64(hi, lo, 1, &hi, &lo);
        printf("Result: %.8x %.8x\n", hi, lo);
    }
}
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I don't think your code works if n > 32. – jsl4tv Jul 24 '10 at 4:04
    
@jsl4tv hmm, you're right. However, shifts between 32 and 63 bits could be faked by rotating twice (once with 31, and again with 32 - n). Not exactly efficient, maybe I'll figure out a better algorithm. – Seth Jul 24 '10 at 4:42
    
If n>=32 just swap the 32-bit words to begin with then perform the n<32 algorithm as usual. – R.. Jul 24 '10 at 7:34

Here's an alternative implementation that swaps values when n >= 32. It also handles the case when n = 0 or n = 32, which causes hi >> (32 - n) to be shifted more than the type width, resulting in undefined behavior.

void
rot64 (uint32_t hi, uint32_t lo, uint32_t n, uint32_t *hi_out, uint32_t *lo_out)
{
    /* Rotations go modulo 64 */
    n &= 0x3f;

    /* Swap values if 32 <= n < 64 */
    if (n & 0x20) {
        lo ^= hi;
        hi ^= lo;
        lo ^= hi;
    }

    /* Shift 0-31 steps */
    uint8_t shift = n & 0x1f;

    if (!shift) {
        *hi_out = hi;
        *lo_out = lo;
        return;
    }

    *hi_out = (hi << shift) | (lo >> (32 - shift));
    *lo_out = (lo << shift) | (hi >> (32 - shift));
}
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