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I have the following scenario:

public class A {
}

public class B extends A {
}

public class C extends B {
    public void Foo();
}

I have a method that can return class A, B or C and I want to cast safely to C but only if the class type is C. This is because I need to call Foo() but I don't want the ClassCastException.

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5  
Before you go full-throttle into using instanceof, have a look at posts like this, as using instanceof is often a sign of a design flaw: stackoverflow.com/questions/2750714/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/2790144/avoiding-instanceof-in-java –  Abel Jul 24 '10 at 13:36
    
Consider using and interface, that way you'll get rid of all the nuances and restrictions imposed to you by the single inheritance model of java. public interface IFoo{ public void foo();} –  StudiousJoseph Jul 24 '10 at 14:28
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Can you do this?

if (obj instanceof C) {
   ((C)obj).Foo();
}
else {
   // Recover somehow...
}

However, please see some of the other comments in this question, as over-use of instanceof is sometimes (not always) a sign that you need to rethink your design.

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Thanks, I will consider changing my design. It's just that it adds a lot of boilerplate to always use type C. –  code-gijoe Jul 24 '10 at 14:11
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You can check the type before casting using instanceof

Object obj = getAB_Or_C();

if ( obj instanceof C ) {
  C c = (C) obj;
}
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What you should do is something like the following, then you don't need to cast.

public class A { 
    public void foo() {
        // default behaviour.
    }
} 

public class B extends A { 
} 

public class C extends B { 
    public void foo() {
       // implementation for C.
    }
} 
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SOmetimes, sometimes not. It doesn't always make sense for A to have a method foo(), and you might not be able to change the class A. –  Simon Nickerson Jul 24 '10 at 13:42
    
I can't change class A - it's part of GWT UI package. –  code-gijoe Jul 24 '10 at 14:13
2  
Next time add such information to your question. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 24 '10 at 14:38
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As an alternative to instanceof, consider

interface Fooable { void foo(); }

class A implements Fooable { ... }
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