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I'm trying to implement parsing of CSS in JavaScript so that:

a {
  color: red;
}

is parsed into the object:

{
  'a' {
    'color': 'red'
  }
}

First off, is there a JavaScript / jQuery library I can use?

My implementation is pretty basic, so I'm sure it is not fool-proof by any means. For example, it works fine for basic CSS, but for a property of the type:

background: url(data:image/png;base64, ....);

It fails because I am using split(';') to separate property:value pairs. Here, ; occurs in the value, so it splits at that point too.

Is there an alternate way to do this?

Here is the code:

parseCSS: function(css) {
    var rules = {};
    css = this.removeComments(css);
    var blocks = css.split('}');
    blocks.pop();
    var len = blocks.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        var pair = blocks[i].split('{');
        rules[$.trim(pair[0])] = this.parseCSSBlock(pair[1]);
    }
    return rules;
},

parseCSSBlock: function(css) { 
    var rule = {};
    var declarations = css.split(';');
    declarations.pop();
    var len = declarations.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        var loc = declarations[i].indexOf(':');
        var property = $.trim(declarations[i].substring(0, loc));
        var value = $.trim(declarations[i].substring(loc + 1));

        if (property != "" && value != "")
            rule[property] = value;
    }
    return rule;
},

removeComments: function(css) {
    return css.replace(/\/\*(\r|\n|.)*\*\//g,"");
}

Thanks!

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1  
Why do you want to do that? what are you trying to achieve. Maybe there's another (simpler) way of solving your problem –  Pablo Fernandez Jul 24 '10 at 19:19
    
blue parsed to red?! :) –  Russ Cam Jul 24 '10 at 19:19
    
@Pablo I've tried hard to think of alternate ways by which I might be able to avoid the need to parse CSS, but unfortunately, I do need to store the rules in some data structure. My project actually works quite well with this, since it mostly involves basic CSS rules (major use case). However, it will be nice to be fool-proof since there is a use case where it may need to parse any CSS. –  ankit Jul 24 '10 at 19:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

There is a CSS parser written in Javascript called JSCSSP

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1  
I did take a look at it earlier, but didn't want to use it as it is so heavy. It does a lot of stuff I don't need to do –  ankit Jul 24 '10 at 19:54
7  
@ankit: Then what are you asking for? If you want to parse correctly (meaning you can handle any arbitrary CSS), then you're going to end up with a "heavy" library. Otherwise, you can stick with your lightweight implementation knowing that it's easy to break. –  josh3736 Jul 24 '10 at 20:07
    
@josh3736 Looks like your comment was the push I required. I was worried about performance issues, but turns out it works pretty well! –  ankit Jul 24 '10 at 21:33
    
Currently looking at github.com/NV/CSSOM –  cburgmer Oct 10 '12 at 21:21
    
I couldn't find a way to parse back from a JSON object to CSS using JSCSSP. JSCSSP parses the CSS to JSON great, and the structure it uses is just what we need, but we also need a way to parse back the JSON object to CSS. Any ideas / suggestions ? –  Norman Jun 5 at 17:39

You can easily use the Browser's own CSSOM to parse CSS:

var rulesForCssText = function (styleContent) {
    var doc = document.implementation.createHTMLDocument(""),
        styleElement = document.createElement("style");

   styleElement.textContent = styleContent;
    // the style will only be parsed once it is added to a document
    doc.body.appendChild(styleElement);

    return styleElement.sheet.cssRules;
};

For each rule returned you can look at the properties in rule.style. See http://jsfiddle.net/v2JsZ/ for an example.

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2  
You rock! It works like a charm! :) I suppose it is the best choice for implementation in the browser. You don't need any library and it is faster then any library, I think. –  Konstantin Smolyanin Sep 10 '13 at 22:11
    
I've updated your jsfiddle with an example which only parses the css: jsfiddle.net/v2JsZ/85 –  Peter van Kekem Aug 1 at 11:45
    
How come if my styles have a background image this code returns an empty path: url()? –  Moss Nov 14 at 2:45
    
@Moss Chrome exposes a bug here code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=161644 –  cburgmer Nov 29 at 10:22

To write the most fool-proof parser, follow the exact rules for tokenization and CSS grammar as defined in the spec. Note that you don't have to implement the spec by the ink. You can start with small parts and CSS that you will most likely encounter, and then expand from there. Even better, skip the entire process altogether and go with @Matthew's solution unless this is a learning exercise.

There are various lexical scanners and parser generators available for JavaScript. The entire grammar is available on w3's website. Why do the re-work when you can simply use that and the parser generators to generate the parser in JavaScript.

  1. Jison
  2. Peg.js
  3. Cruiser.Parse
  4. McLexer
  5. JS/CC

The production rules for CSS are given below.

stylesheet
  : [ CHARSET_SYM STRING ';' ]?
    [S|CDO|CDC]* [ import [ CDO S* | CDC S* ]* ]*
    [ [ ruleset | media | page ] [ CDO S* | CDC S* ]* ]*
  ;
import
  : IMPORT_SYM S*
    [STRING|URI] S* media_list? ';' S*
  ;
media
  : MEDIA_SYM S* media_list LBRACE S* ruleset* '}' S*
  ;
media_list
  : medium [ COMMA S* medium]*
  ;
medium
  : IDENT S*
  ;
page
  : PAGE_SYM S* pseudo_page?
    '{' S* declaration? [ ';' S* declaration? ]* '}' S*
  ;
pseudo_page
  : ':' IDENT S*
  ;
operator
  : '/' S* | ',' S*
  ;
combinator
  : '+' S*
  | '>' S*
  ;
unary_operator
  : '-' | '+'
  ;
property
  : IDENT S*
  ;
ruleset
  : selector [ ',' S* selector ]*
    '{' S* declaration? [ ';' S* declaration? ]* '}' S*
  ;
selector
  : simple_selector [ combinator selector | S+ [ combinator? selector ]? ]?
  ;
simple_selector
  : element_name [ HASH | class | attrib | pseudo ]*
  | [ HASH | class | attrib | pseudo ]+
  ;
class
  : '.' IDENT
  ;
element_name
  : IDENT | '*'
  ;
attrib
  : '[' S* IDENT S* [ [ '=' | INCLUDES | DASHMATCH ] S*
    [ IDENT | STRING ] S* ]? ']'
  ;
pseudo
  : ':' [ IDENT | FUNCTION S* [IDENT S*]? ')' ]
  ;
declaration
  : property ':' S* expr prio?
  ;
prio
  : IMPORTANT_SYM S*
  ;
expr
  : term [ operator? term ]*
  ;
term
  : unary_operator?
    [ NUMBER S* | PERCENTAGE S* | LENGTH S* | EMS S* | EXS S* | ANGLE S* |
      TIME S* | FREQ S* ]
  | STRING S* | IDENT S* | URI S* | hexcolor | function
  ;
function
  : FUNCTION S* expr ')' S*
  ;
/*
 * There is a constraint on the color that it must
 * have either 3 or 6 hex-digits (i.e., [0-9a-fA-F])
 * after the "#"; e.g., "#000" is OK, but "#abcd" is not.
 */
hexcolor
  : HASH S*
  ;
share|improve this answer
    
These production rules are outdated for CSS3. I don't see '~' for example –  huyz Aug 26 '11 at 11:05
1  
You can look at CoffeeScript for a nice well documented example: jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/documentation/docs/… –  Brandon Sep 8 '11 at 18:08

My very simple parser. Handle alert function by yourself.

function parseCss(str) {
    var buff = "";

    var blockOpen = false;
    var selBuff = "";

    var keyBuff = "";

    var valOpen = false;

    for(var i in str) {
        var pol = str[i];

        if(pol=="\t") continue;

        if(pol == "{")
        {
            blockOpen = true;
            selBuff = buff;
            buff = "";
            continue;
        }

        if(blockOpen)
        {
            if(pol == "}")
            {
                blockOpen = valOpen = false;
                selBuff = keyBuff = buff = "";
                continue;
            }

            if(!valOpen)
            {
                if(pol == ":") {
                    valOpen = true;
                    keyBuff = buff;
                    buff = "";
                    continue;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if(pol == "\n" || pol==";" || str[i] == "}"){
                    alert({key:keyBuff, value:buff, selector:selBuff});

                    valOpen = false;
                    keyBuff = buff = "";
                }
            }
        }

        pol == "\n" ? buff = "" : buff += pol;
    }
}
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