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I have a table that stores transaction information. Each transaction is has a unique (auto incremented) id column, a column with the customer's id number, a column called bill_paid which indicates if the transaction has been paid for by the customer with a yes or no, and a few other columns which hold other information not relevant to my question.

I want to select all customer ids from the transaction table for which the bill has not been paid, but if the customer has had multiple transactions where the bill has not been paid I DO NOT want to select them more than once. This way I can generate that customer one bill with all the transactions they owe for instead of a separate bill for each transaction. How would I build a query that did that for me?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Returns exactly one customer_id for each customer with bill_paid equal to 'no':

SELECT 
    t.customer_id
FROM 
    transactions t
WHERE 
    t.bill_paid = 'no'
GROUP BY
    t.customer_id

Edit:
GROUP BY summarises your resultset.
Caveat: Every column selected must be either 'grouped by' or aggregated in some fashion. As shown by nikic you could use SUM to get the total amount owed, e.g.:

SELECT 
    t.customer_id
    , SUM(t.amount) AS TOTAL_OWED
FROM 
    transactions AS t
WHERE 
    t.bill_paid = 'no'
GROUP BY
    t.customer_id

t is simply an alias.
So instead of typing transactions everywhere you can now simply type t. The alias is not necessary here since you query only one table, but I find them invaluable for larger queries. You can optionally type AS to make it more clear that you're using an alias.

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Since I am not a MySQL ninja would you break this down a bit more for me. Specifically, what does the t. represent? Also, what is transactions t doing? –  ubiquibacon Jul 24 '10 at 22:25
    
@typoknig: sure. Please see edit. –  bernie Jul 24 '10 at 22:35
    
Thanks, I am putting it all together now and it looks like it is going to work. Let me ask you this, is it frowned upon to use PHP for calculating my totals instead of the MySQL SUM() function? I want to stick with "best practices" but I thought it would be easier to do my calculations with PHP since the bills I am generating are itemized. –  ubiquibacon Jul 25 '10 at 0:00
    
Simple summations, like the above example, are simpler (and likely much faster) to handle in MySQL. –  bernie Jul 25 '10 at 0:10
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You might try the Group By operator, eg group by the customer.

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1  
Thanks for your answer, group by is what I was looking for, but @Adam Bernier explained it more thoroughly. –  ubiquibacon Jul 25 '10 at 0:22
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SELECT customer, SUM(toPay) FROM .. GROUP BY customer
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How does this exclude the bill_paid=yes columns? –  Konerak Jul 24 '10 at 22:22
    
Thanks for your answer, but as @Konerak pointed out, this does not take into account the status of bill_paid. –  ubiquibacon Jul 25 '10 at 0:23
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