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How can I delete all tables in postgresql, working from the command line?

I don't want to drop the database itself - just all tables and all the data in them.

Thanks.

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1  
What command line are you talking about? For all we know you're looking for a Windows PowerShell implementation. –  Greg Smith Jul 25 '10 at 1:24
    
Sorry. Working on Unix, after typing 'psql' at the command line - so the psql command-line environment itself. –  AP257 Jul 25 '10 at 8:34
26  
DROP SCHEMA public CASCADE; -- shudder –  wildplasser Jun 4 '12 at 20:18
13  
Why'd you say "shudder"? –  Joe Van Dyk Oct 28 '12 at 1:19
5  
@JoeVanDyk because public is the default schema for postgres databases, it sort of feels like 'rm -rf /' on unix –  Steve Goodman Jan 29 at 23:25

12 Answers 12

If all of your tables are in a single schema, this approach could work (below code assumes that the name of your schema is 'public')

drop schema public cascade;
create schema public;
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20  
+1 for create schema public; –  manish_s Dec 14 '12 at 8:48
20  
Note that this will also delete all functions, views, etc defined in the public schema. –  Brad Koch Mar 24 '13 at 0:15
1  
Note that this will not remove the system tables (such as those that begin with pg_) as they are in a different schema, pg_catalog. –  congusbongus Aug 4 at 7:07
    
Like @BradKoch stated, this will also delete the schema's extensions. I was using postgis and had to re-enable extensions. –  miguelcobain Sep 3 at 14:57
1  
This will create the schema w/ OWNER set to the user you're logged into psql as. This will conflict w/ applications who log in as a different user. In that case, you also need to run "ALTER SCHEMA public OWNER to postgres;" (or to whatever user your app uses to create tables) –  mgojohn Oct 8 at 15:49

You can write a query to generate a SQL script like this:

select 'drop table "' || tablename || '" cascade;' from pg_tables;

Or:

select 'drop table if exists "' || tablename || '" cascade;' from pg_tables;

In case some tables are automatically dropped due to cascade option in a previous sentence.

Additionally, as stated in the comments, you might want to filter the tables you want to drop by schema name:

select 'drop table if exists "' || tablename || '" cascade;' 
  from pg_tables
 where schemaname = 'public'; -- or any other schema

And then run it.

Glorious COPY+PASTE will also work.

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2  
I think you meant: You can write a query like this... ...And then run the output of the query –  Vinko Vrsalovic Jul 24 '10 at 23:31
2  
True. That's what I meant. :-) –  Pablo Santa Cruz Jul 24 '10 at 23:31
4  
select 'drop table if exists "' || tablename || '" cascade;' from pg_tables; will make sure tables with uppercase are also properly dropped. –  Ivo van der Wijk Apr 19 '12 at 14:03
4  
the clause "where schemaname = 'public'" that LenW added in his answer can be very useful to reduce the scope of deletion to only the database you managed and not the system's ones –  Guillaume Gendre Oct 29 '12 at 16:36
2  
Love it! This is a great bit of stuff. –  Nicholas DiPiazza Jan 26 '13 at 0:40

The most accepted answer as of this writing (January 2014) is:

drop schema public cascade;
create schema public;

This does work, however if your intention is to restore the public schema to its virgin state this does not fully accomplish the task. Under pgAdmin III for PostgreSQL 9.3.1, if you click on the "public" schema created this way and look in the "SQL pane" you will see the following:

-- Schema: public

-- DROP SCHEMA public;

CREATE SCHEMA public
  AUTHORIZATION postgres;

However, by contrast a brand new database will have the following:

-- Schema: public

-- DROP SCHEMA public;

CREATE SCHEMA public
  AUTHORIZATION postgres;

GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA public TO postgres;
GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA public TO public;
COMMENT ON SCHEMA public
  IS 'standard public schema';

For me using a python web framework which creates database tables (web2py), using the former caused problems:

<class 'psycopg2.ProgrammingError'> no schema has been selected to create in 

So to my mind the fully correct answer is:

DROP SCHEMA public CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA public;
GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA public TO postgres;
GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA public TO public;
COMMENT ON SCHEMA public IS 'standard public schema';

(also note to issue these commands from pgAdmin III, I went to Plugins-> PSQL Console)

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Confirmed. The two line solution (drop then create) used to work on PostgreSQL 9.1. After upgrading to 9.3, the two extra grant is necessary. –  Jinghao Shi Sep 15 at 23:42
drop schema public cascade;

should do the trick.

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1  
this absolutely works! –  Luca Trazzi Jan 9 '13 at 18:44
8  
Note that this will also delete all functions, views, etc defined in the public schema. –  Joe Van Dyk Jan 9 '13 at 22:23
2  
also you'll have to recreated again afterwards to add the tables back with CREATE SCHEMA public;. Also see stackoverflow.com/a/14286370 for more information –  mikermcneil Nov 20 '13 at 23:15

As per Pablo above, to just drop from a specific schema, with respect to case:

select 'drop table "' || tablename || '" cascade;' 
from pg_tables where schemaname = 'public';
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1  
thanks for the "where schemaname = 'public'" tip. useful. –  Guillaume Gendre Oct 29 '12 at 16:37

Following Pablo and LenW, here's a one-liner that does it all both preparing and then executing:

psql -U $PGUSER $PGDB -t -c "select 'drop table \"' || tablename || '\" cascade;' from pg_tables where schemaname = 'public'" | psql -U $PGUSER $PGDB

NB: either set or replace $PGUSER and $PGDB with the values you want

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works great, thanks for the tip ! –  Guillaume Gendre Oct 30 '12 at 9:33

If you have the PL/PGSQL procedural language installed you can use the following to remove everything without a shell/Perl external script.

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS remove_all();

CREATE FUNCTION remove_all() RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    rec RECORD;
    cmd text;
BEGIN
    cmd := '';

    FOR rec IN SELECT
            'DROP SEQUENCE ' || quote_ident(n.nspname) || '.'
                || quote_ident(c.relname) || ' CASCADE;' AS name
        FROM
            pg_catalog.pg_class AS c
        LEFT JOIN
            pg_catalog.pg_namespace AS n
        ON
            n.oid = c.relnamespace
        WHERE
            relkind = 'S' AND
            n.nspname NOT IN ('pg_catalog', 'pg_toast') AND
            pg_catalog.pg_table_is_visible(c.oid)
    LOOP
        cmd := cmd || rec.name;
    END LOOP;

    FOR rec IN SELECT
            'DROP TABLE ' || quote_ident(n.nspname) || '.'
                || quote_ident(c.relname) || ' CASCADE;' AS name
        FROM
            pg_catalog.pg_class AS c
        LEFT JOIN
            pg_catalog.pg_namespace AS n
        ON
            n.oid = c.relnamespace WHERE relkind = 'r' AND
            n.nspname NOT IN ('pg_catalog', 'pg_toast') AND
            pg_catalog.pg_table_is_visible(c.oid)
    LOOP
        cmd := cmd || rec.name;
    END LOOP;

    FOR rec IN SELECT
            'DROP FUNCTION ' || quote_ident(ns.nspname) || '.'
                || quote_ident(proname) || '(' || oidvectortypes(proargtypes)
                || ');' AS name
        FROM
            pg_proc
        INNER JOIN
            pg_namespace ns
        ON
            (pg_proc.pronamespace = ns.oid)
        WHERE
            ns.nspname =
            'public'
        ORDER BY
            proname
    LOOP
        cmd := cmd || rec.name;
    END LOOP;

    EXECUTE cmd;
    RETURN;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

SELECT remove_all();

Rather than type this in at the "psql" prompt I would suggest you copy it to a file and then pass the file as input to psql using the "--file" or "-f" options:

psql -f clean_all_pg.sql

Credit where credit is due: I wrote the function, but think the queries (or the first one at least) came from someone on one of the pgsql mailing lists years ago. Don't remember exactly when or which one.

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You can use the string_agg function to make a comma-separated list, perfect for DROP TABLE. From a bash script:

#!/bin/bash
TABLES=`psql $PGDB -t --command "SELECT string_agg(table_name, ',') FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema='public'"`

echo Dropping tables:${TABLES}
psql $PGDB --command "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS ${TABLES} CASCADE"
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should should be #!/bin/sh –  Good Person May 11 at 8:04

Just in case... Simple Python script that clean Postgresql database

import psycopg2
import sys

# Drop all tables from a given database

try:
    conn = psycopg2.connect("dbname='akcja_miasto' user='postgres' password='postgres'")
    conn.set_isolation_level(0)
except:
    print "Unable to connect to the database."

cur = conn.cursor()

try:
    cur.execute("SELECT table_schema,table_name FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema = 'public' ORDER BY table_schema,table_name")
    rows = cur.fetchall()
    for row in rows:
        print "dropping table: ", row[1]   
        cur.execute("drop table " + row[1] + " cascade") 
    cur.close()
    conn.close()        
except:
    print "Error: ", sys.exc_info()[1]

Make sure that after copying it the indentation is right since Python relies on it.

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Rake task for Rails for destroy all tables in current database

namespace :db do
  # rake db:drop_all_tables
  task drop_all_tables: :environment do
    query = <<-QUERY
      SELECT
        table_name
      FROM
        information_schema.tables
      WHERE
        table_type = 'BASE TABLE'
      AND
        table_schema NOT IN ('pg_catalog', 'information_schema');
    QUERY

    connection = ActiveRecord::Base.connection
    results    = connection.execute query

    tables = results.map do |line|
      table_name = line['table_name']
    end.join ", "

    connection.execute "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS #{ tables } CASCADE;"
  end
end
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It might be simpler/safer to say AND table_schema = 'public' rather than NOT IN that list. –  Steve Sep 30 at 2:15

in a window batch file...

@echo off
FOR /f "tokens=2 delims=|" %%G IN ('psql --host localhost --username postgres --command="\dt" YOUR_TABLE_NAME') DO (
   psql --host localhost --username postgres --command="DROP table if exists %%G cascade" sfkb
   echo table %%G dropped
)
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I enhanced the bash method from jamie by taking care of views because his only respects the table type "base table" which is the default.

following bash code deletes the views first and then all the rest

#!/usr/bin/env bash

PGDB="yourDB"
# By exporting user & pass your dont need to interactively type them on execution
export PGUSER="PGusername"
export PGPASSWORD="PGpassword"

VIEWS=`psql -d $PGDB -t --command "SELECT string_agg(table_name, ',') FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema='public' AND table_type='VIEW'"`
BASETBLS=`psql -d $PGDB -t --command "SELECT string_agg(table_name, ',') FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema='public' AND table_type='BASE TABLE'"`

echo Dropping views:${VIEWS}
psql $PGDB --command "DROP VIEW IF EXISTS ${VIEWS} CASCADE"
echo Dropping tables:${BASETBLS}
psql $PGDB --command "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS ${BASETBLS} CASCADE"
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