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Is it common in Python to keep testing for type values when working in a OOP fashion?

class Foo():
    def __init__(self,barObject):
        self.bar = setBarObject(barObject)

    def setBarObject(barObject);
        if (isInstance(barObject,Bar):
            self.bar = barObject
        else:
            # throw exception, log, etc.

class Bar():
    pass

Or I can use a more loose approach, like:

class Foo():
    def __init__(self,barObject):
        self.bar = barObject

class Bar():
    pass
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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Nope, in fact it's overwhelmingly common not to test for type values, as in your second approach. The idea is that a client of your code (i.e. some other programmer who uses your class) should be able to pass any kind of object that has all the appropriate methods or properties. If it doesn't happen to be an instance of some particular class, that's fine; your code never needs to know the difference. This is called duck typing, because of the adage "If it quacks like a duck and flies like a duck, it might as well be a duck" (well, that's not the actual adage but I got the gist of it I think)

One place you'll see this a lot is in the standard library, with any functions that handle file input or output. Instead of requiring an actual file object, they'll take anything that implements the read() or readline() method (depending on the function), or write() for writing. In fact you'll often see this in the documentation, e.g. with tokenize.generate_tokens, which I just happened to be looking at earlier today:

The generate_tokens() generator requires one argument, readline, which must be a callable object which provides the same interface as the readline() method of built-in file objects (see section File Objects). Each call to the function should return one line of input as a string.

This allows you to use a StringIO object (like an in-memory file), or something wackier like a dialog box, in place of a real file.

In your own code, just access whatever properties of an object you need, and if it's the wrong kind of object, one of the properties you need won't be there and it'll throw an exception.

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4  
Second that. Also see EAFP: Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Jul 25 '10 at 0:20
    
this is very interesting. After all, we should enjoy pythons features instead of defending from them. –  George Jul 25 '10 at 0:24
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I think that it's good practice to check input for type. It's reasonable to assume that if you asked a user to give one data type they might give you another, so you should code to defend against this.

However, it seems like a waste of time (both writing and running the program) to check the type of input that the program generates independent of input. As in a strongly-typed language, checking type isn't important to defend against programmer error.

So basically, check input but nothing else so that code can run smoothly and users don't have to wonder why they got an exception rather than a result.

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1  
This is probably good advice on other languages, but it is not the common practice in Python. See David's answer above. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Jul 25 '10 at 0:21
1  
very important comment. keep testing the INPUT. the difference between programmer error and user error is important. thanks. –  George Jul 25 '10 at 0:23
    
I'm not sure; I learned python from MIT OCW and the professors at MIT always talked about "coding defensively", even in python –  Rafe Kettler Jul 25 '10 at 0:24
    
@Rafe Kettler: generalizations are always wrong. –  msw Jul 25 '10 at 0:28
1  
@Rafe: In the context of python, coding defensively would mean to either check that the method/attribute that you intend to access actually exists or (more pythonic) to assume that it does and catch the AttributeError if it doesn't. This is different from checking the type of the object. –  aaronasterling Jul 25 '10 at 1:49
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If your alternative to the type check is an else containing exception handling, then you should really consider duck typing one tier up, supporting as many objects with the methods you require from the input, and working inside a try. You can then except (and except as specifically as possible) that. The final result wouldn't be unlike what you have there, but a lot more versatile and Pythonic.

Everything else that needed to be said about the actual question, whether it's common/good practice or not, I think has been answered excellently by David's.

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I agree with some of the above answers, in that I generally never check for type from one function to another.

However, as someone else mentioned, anything accepted from a user should be checked, and for things like this I use regular expressions. The nice thing about using regular expressions to validate user input is that not only can you verify that the data is in the correct format, but you can parse the input into a more convenient form, like a string into a dictionary.

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