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I'm currently designing a kind of CSS 'mega dropdown' menu - basically a normal CSS-only dropdown menu, but one that contains different types of content.

There is an example here.

My question is more of a 'can you think of a way around this problem' sort of thing.
At the moment, it appears that CSS3 Transitions don't apply to the 'display' property, i.e. you can't do any sort of transition from display: none to display: block (or any combination).

Can anyone think of a way for the second-tier menu from the above example to 'fade in' when someone hovers over one of the top level menu items?

I'm aware that you can use transitions on the visibility: property, but I can't think of a way to utilise that effectively.

I've also tried using height but that just failed miserably.

I'm also aware that it's trivial to achieve this using JavaScript, but I wanted to challenge myself to use just CSS and I think I'm coming up a little short.

All and any suggestions most welcome.

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Does the CSS transition work if you apply it to the opacity property, rather than display? –  Paul D. Waite Jul 25 '10 at 22:59
    
position: absolute; visibility: hidden; is same as display: none; –  Jawad Sep 16 '12 at 16:31
    
@Jawad: Only if you add something like z-index:0 as well. –  DanMan Oct 31 '12 at 9:52
    
@Jawad: It's recommended to never use visibility: hidden unless you want screenreaders to read it (whereas typical browsers won't). It only defines the visibility of the element (like saying opacity: 0), and it's still selectable, clickable, and whatever it used to be; it's just not visible. –  Forest Ka May 19 '13 at 23:14
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16 Answers

up vote 265 down vote accepted

You need to hide the element by other means in order to get this to work. I had the same issue on this page:

http://endlessfeast.tv/episodes.php

I accomplished the effect by positioning both div's absolutely and setting the hidden one to opacity: 0.

If you even toggle the display element from none to block your transition on other elements will not occur.

To work around this always allow the element to be display block but hide the element by adjusting any of these means:

  1. Set the height to 0.
  2. Set the opacity to 0.
  3. Position the element outside of the frame of another element that has overflow: hidden.

There are likely more solutions but you cannot perform a transition if you toggle the element to display none. For example, you may attempt to try something like this:

div {
    display: none;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
}

div.active {
    opacity: 1;
    display: block;
}

But that will NOT work. From my experience, I have found this to do nothing :-(

So you will always need to keep the element display block. But you could get around it by doing something like this:

div {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}

div.active {
    opacity: 1;
    height: auto;
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Thanks Jim for a thorough answer. You're absolutely right about the fact that if the display: property changes at all, then ALL of your transitions will not work. Which is a shame - I wonder what the reasoning behind that is. On a side note, on the same link I posted in the original question, you can see where I'm at with it. The only (small) problem I have is in Chrome [5.0.375.125] when the page loads, you can see the menu quickly fading away as the elements are loaded on the page. Firefox 4.0b2 and Safari 5.0 are absolutely fine... bug or something I've missed? –  iamfriendly Jul 28 '10 at 19:45
    
I'm not seeing the transitions occurring at all on that link - have you changed something? It's strange that your issue would only occur in Chrome. This could be a bug and no fault on your end. –  Jim Jeffers Jul 28 '10 at 22:18
2  
I agree that this is right on and will contribute this; a heads up for future travelers. I found a working solution in Chrome, but I found it fails on iPhone 4: visibility:hidden; opacity:0; -webkit-transition: all .2s ease-in-out; Not only does this not transition correctly, but the target element will never show up. QA will fail you, me, and your mom. –  Simple As Could Be Apr 5 '11 at 19:37
1  
If you set your hidden state to height: 0; and don't transition it, the transition will not work. I tried this just trying to transition opacity. I had to remove the height: 0; –  chovy Jun 27 '13 at 0:00
4  
The answer below is much better! –  Boni Nov 4 '13 at 16:06
show 5 more comments

You can concatenate two transitions or more, and visibility is what comes handy this time.

div > ul {
  . . .
  visibility:hidden;
  opacity:0;
  transition:visibility 0s linear 0.5s,opacity 0.5s linear;
}
div:hover > ul {
  visibility:visible;
  opacity:1;
  transition-delay:0s;
}

(Don't forget the vendor prefixes to the transition property!)

More details are in this article

share|improve this answer
7  
visibility worked very well for me - finally there's good use for this property :) –  Kobi Mar 4 '12 at 13:54
6  
This answer seems like less work than the others and achieves what we would expect from display:none/block; Thanks. Saved me a ton of time. –  Brendan Aug 28 '12 at 19:16
1  
OMG, it actually works ;) –  Quandary Aug 22 '13 at 17:56
2  
Yeah the problem with this is anything behind it will overlap even if it's not visible. I found using height:0 a much better solution –  josh Sep 2 '13 at 23:34
3  
This is nice but the problem is that "visibility hidden" elements still occupy space while "display none" does not. –  Rui Marques Nov 14 '13 at 10:48
show 7 more comments

Currently all major browsers disable CSS transitions if you try to change the display property, but CSS animations still work fine so we can use them as a work-around.

Example Code:- (You can apply it to your menu accordingly) [Demo]

Add the following CSS to your stylesheet:-

@-webkit-keyframes fadeIn {
    from { opacity: 0; }
      to { opacity: 1; }
}

@keyframes fadeIn {
    from { opacity: 0; }
      to { opacity: 1; }
}

Then apply the fadeIn animation to the child on parent hover:- (and of course set display: block)

.parent:hover .child {
    display: block;

    -webkit-animation: fadeIn 1s;
    animation: fadeIn 1s;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for this. The height: 0 trick (for transitions) mentioned above doesn't seem to work because the height gets set to 0 on the fade-out transition, but this trick seems to work just fine. –  Elliot Winkler Mar 14 '12 at 20:42
1  
Thanks for this. –  bmavity May 3 '12 at 11:39
5  
Thanks, very useful. But how to fade it out? –  Manny Oct 15 '12 at 2:37
1  
This, solves all my worldly woes –  Andrew Bullock Oct 31 '13 at 13:59
1  
It's very interesting. Didn't notice before. Thanks. If it works, it's the best answer, actually. –  Rantiev Mar 31 at 21:25
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display is not one of the properties that transition works upon.

See http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-transitions/#animatable-properties- for the list of properties that can have transitions applied to them.

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I suspect that the reason that transitions are disabled if “display” is changed is because of what display actually does. It does not change anything that could conceivably be smoothly animated.

“display: none;” and “visibility: hidden;” are two entirely different things. Both do have the effect of making the element invisible, but with “visibility: hidden;” it’s still rendered in the layout, but just not visibly so. The hidden element still takes up space, and is still rendered inline or as a block or block-inline or table or whatever the “display” element tells it to render as, and takes up space accordingly. Other elements do not automatically move to occupy that space. The hidden element just doesn’t render its actual pixels to the output.

“display: none” on the other hand actually prevents the element from rendering entirely. It does not take up any layout space. Other elements that would’ve occupied some or all of the space taken up by this element now adjust to occupy that space, as if the element simply did not exist at all.

“display” is not just another visual attribute. It establishes the entire rendering mode of the element, such as whether it’s a block, inline, inline-block, table, table-row, table-cell, list-item, or whatever! Each of those have very different layout ramifications, and there would be no reasonable way to animate or smoothly transition them (try to imagine a smooth transition from “block” to “inline” or vice-versa, for instance!).

This is why transitions are disabled if display changes (even if the change is to or from “none” — “none” isn’t merely invisiblity, it’s its own element rendering mode that means no rendering at all!),

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My neat JavaScript trick is to separate the entire scenario into two different functions!

To prepare things, one global variable is declared and one event handler is defined:

  var tTimeout;
  element.addEventListener("transitionend", afterTransition, true);//firefox
  element.addEventListener("webkitTransitionEnd", afterTransition, true);//chrome

Then, when hiding element, I use something like this:

function hide(){
  element.style.opacity = 0;
}

function afterTransition(){
  element.style.display = 'none';
}

For reappearing the element, I am doing something like this:

function show(){
  element.style.display = 'block';
  tTimeout = setTimeout(timeoutShow, 100);
}

function timeoutShow(){
  element.style.opacity = 1;
}

It works, so far!

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I ran into this today, with a position: fixed modal that I was reusing. I couldn't keep it display: none and then animate it, as it just jumped into appearance, and and z-index (negative values, etc) did weird things as well.

I was also using a height: 0 to height: 100%, but it only worked when the modal appeared. This is the same as if you used left: -100% or something.

Then it struck me that there was a simple answer. Et voila:

First, your hidden modal. Notice the height is 0, and check out the height declaration in transitions... it has a 500ms, which is longer than my opacity transition. Remember, this affects the out-going fade-out transition: returning the modal to its default state.

#modal-overlay {
    background: #999;
    background: rgba(33,33,33,.2);
    display: block;
    overflow: hidden;
    height: 0;
    width: 100%;
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    opacity: 0;
    z-index: 1;
    -webkit-transition: height 0s 500ms, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
       -moz-transition: height 0s 500ms, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
            -ms-transition: height 0s 500ms, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
         -o-transition: height 0s 500ms, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
        transition: height 0s 500ms, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
}

Second, your visible modal. Say you're setting a .modal-active to the body. Now the height is 100%, and my transition has also changed. I want the height to be instantly changed, and the opacity to take 300ms.

.modal-active #modal-overlay {
    height: 100%;
    opacity: 1;
    z-index: 90000;
    -webkit-transition: height 0s, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
       -moz-transition: height 0s, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
        -ms-transition: height 0s, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
         -o-transition: height 0s, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
            transition: height 0s, opacity 300ms ease-in-out;
}

That's it, it works like a charm.

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I suspect anyone just starting CSS transitions quickly discovers that they don't work if you're modifying the display property (block/none) at the same time. One work-around that hasn't yet been mentioned is that you can continue to use display:block/none to hide/show the element, but set its opacity to 0 so that even when it's display:block, it's still invisible. Then to fade it in, add another CSS class such as "on" which sets the opacity to 1 and defines the transition for opacity. As you may have imagined, you'll have to use JavaScript to add that "on" class to the element, but at least you're still using CSS for the actual transition.

P.S. If you find yourself in a situation where you need to do both display:block, and add class "on", at the same time, defer the latter using setTimeout. Otherwise the browser just sees both things as happening at once and disables the transition.

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Excellent, thanks! I wrote another answer with an example that actually works with display:none. –  mojuba Aug 30 '12 at 20:50
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Change overflow:hidden to overflow:visible. It works better. I use like this:

#menu ul li ul {
    background-color:#fe1c1c;
    width:85px;
    height:0px;
    opacity:0;
    box-shadow:1px 3px 10px #000000;
    border-radius:3px;
    z-index:1;
    -webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;
    -moz-transition:all 0.6s ease;
}

#menu ul li:hover ul  {
    overflow:visible;
    opacity:1;
    height:140px;
}

visible is better because overflow:hidden act exactly like a display:none.

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Instead of using display you could store the element 'off-screen' until you needed it, then set its position to where you want it and transform it at the same time. This brings up a whole host of other design issues though, so ymmv. You probably wouldn't want to use display anyway, as you'd want the content to be accessible to screen readers, which for the most part try to obey rules for visibility - i.e., if it shouldn't be visible to the eye, it won't show up as content to the agent.

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According to W3C Working Draft 19 November 2013 display is not an animatable property. Fortunately, visibility is animatable. You may chain its transition with a transition of opacity (JSFiddle):

  • HTML:

    <a href="http://example.com" id="foo">Foo</a>
    <button id="hide-button">Hide</button>
    <button id="show-button">Show</button>
    
  • CSS:

    #foo {
        transition-property: visibility, opacity;
        transition-duration: 0, 1s;
    }
    
    #foo.hidden {
        opacity: 0;
        visibility: hidden;
        transition-property: opacity, visibility;
        transition-duration: 1s, 0;
        transition-delay: 0, 1s;
    }
    
  • JavaScript for testing:

    var foo = document.getElementById('foo');
    
    document.getElementById('hide-button').onclick = function () {
        foo.className = 'hidden';
    };
    
    document.getElementById('show-button').onclick = function () {
        foo.className = '';
    };
    

Note that if you just make the link transparent, without setting visibility: hidden, then it would stay clickable.

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The simplest universal solution to the problem is: feel free to specify display:none in your CSS, however you will have change it to block (or whatever else) using JavaScript, and then you'll also have to add a class to your element in question that actually does the transition with setTimeout(). That's all.

I.e.:

<style>
#el {
    display: none;
    opacity: 0;
}
#el.auto-fade-in {
    opacity: 1;
    transition: all 1s ease-out; /* future, future, please come sooner! */
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease-out;
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease-out;
    -o-transition: all 1s ease-out;
}
</style>

<div id=el>Well, well, well</div>

<script>
var el = document.getElementById('el');
el.style.display = 'block';
setTimeout(function () { el.className = 'auto-fade-in' }, 0);
</script>

Tested in the latest sane browsers. Obviously shouldn't work in IE9 or earlier.

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You can simply use css visibility: hidden/visible instead of display : none/block

div {
    visibility:hidden;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    -moz-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    -o-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
}

parent:hover > div {
    opacity: 1;
    visibility: visible;
}
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1  
This reserves the space though, leaving an empty hole. If you want to collapse a space you have to animate height or some other property. –  Marcy Sutton Sep 17 '13 at 21:47
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you can also use this:

.dropdown {
height: 0px;
width: 0px;
opacity: .0;
color: white;
}
.dropdown:hover {
height: 20px;
width: 50px;
opacity: 1;
transition: opacity 200ms;
/* Safari */
-webkit-transition: opacity 200ms;
}
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Taking from a few of these answers and some suggestions elsewhere, the following works great for hover menus (I'm using this with bootstrap 3, specifically):

nav .dropdown-menu {
    display: block;
    overflow: hidden;
    max-height: 0;
    opacity: 0;
    transition: max-height 500ms, opacity 300ms;
    -webkit-transition: max-height 500ms, opacity 300ms;
}
nav .dropdown:hover .dropdown-menu {
    max-height: 500px;
    opacity: 1;
    transition: max-height 0, opacity 300ms;
    -webkit-transition: max-height 0, opacity 300ms;
}

You could also use height in place of max-height if you specify both values since height:auto is not allowed with transitions. The hover value of max-height needs to be greater than the height of the menu can possibly be.

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I think you should use transition on opacity or height, like thi:

.dropdown {
  transition-property: height, opacity;
  display: none;
}

.dropdown:hover {
  height: 100%;
  opacity: 1.0;
  display: block;
}

I don't know if it works

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Transitions for other properties here won't work if display is present (at least, not in Chrome). –  Sam Dutton Dec 2 '11 at 12:21
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