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Hey, I'm getting a linker error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol when trying to use an overloaded + operator. I'll show you snip-its from the class, and how I'm using it in main. If you need to see more, let me know, I'm just going to try and keep things concise.

/** vec.h **/
#ifndef __VEC_H_
#define __VEC_H_

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

namespace xoor{

    template<typename T> 
    class vec{

    public:
        inline friend vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&);
        inline const vec<T>& operator += (const vec<T>&);

    private:
        std::vector<T> m_index;
    }; // Vec.


    template<typename T> 
    vec<T>& operator + (const vec<T>& a, const vec<T>& b){
        vec<T> product = a;
        product += b;

        return product;
    } // Addition.

    template<typename T> 
    const vec<T>& vec<T>::operator += (const vec<T>& v){
        for (unsigned short i =0; i < m_index.size(); ++i){
            if (i >= v.size())
                break;
            m_index[i] += v.getIndex()[i];
        }

        return * this;
    } // Addition Compound.


} // xoor

#endif // __VEC_H_

Note that I've got [] overloaded as well, so I'm just accessing parts of m_index with it. getIndex() just returns m_index. And size() returns m_index.size()

/** main.cpp **/

#include <iostream>
#include "vec.h"

void testHook();

int main(){
    testHook();
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

void testHook(){
    using namespace xoor;
    vec<double> vA(3); // passing 3 for 3 elements
    vec<double> vB(3);

    // v + v
    std::cout << "\n\tA + B = ";
    vec<double> vAB(3);
    vAB = vA + vB; // PRODUCES THE LNK2019
    vAB.print(std::cout); // Outputs the vec class to the console.
}

Error Message:

Error   1   error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "class xoor::vec<double> __cdecl xoor::operator+(class xoor::vec<double> const &,class xoor::vec<double> const &)" (??Hxoor@@YA?AV?$vec@N@0@ABV10@0@Z) referenced in function "void __cdecl testHook(void)" (?testHook@@YAXXZ)    main.obj

Update:

The following is now directly above the class definition. I continue to get the same linker error, as described above.

    template<typename T> 
    class vec;

    template<typename T> 
    vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&); 

Update 2: Solution.

The above update is incorrect. sbi's solution did work, I just failed to template the operator as follows.

    template<typename T> 
    vec<T> operator +<T> (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&); 

sbi, and david were discussing why I was using friends in the first place. Initially I was using them, because you can not pass two parameters to an overloaded binary operator such as +, and immediate sought after friends as the solution. As it turns out, you can still use the binary operator quite easily with a single parameter. Here is the final solution.

// ...
template<typename T> 
class vec{
    public:
    const vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&)const;
    // ...

}; // Vec.

template<typename T> 
const vec<T> vec<T>::operator + (const vec<T>& v)const{
    matrix<T> product = *this;
    vec(product += v);
} // Addition.

Also, for anyone else reading this, its worth while to check out sbi's notes at the bottom of his answer. There are some things I've been doing that are superfluous.

Thanks for the help everyone. Happy coding.

share|improve this question
    
If this is homework (and it looks suspiciously so), you should add the homework tag. Many of us answer homework questions differently, so that you learn as much as possible from this (while other questions are usually asked so that whoever asks can go on doing what they do as fast as possible). –  sbi Jul 25 '10 at 23:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In order to befriend a template, I think you'll need to declare that template before the class definition in which you want to befriend it. However, for this declaration to compile, you'll need to forward-declare the class template. So this should work:

template<typename T> 
class vec;

template<typename T> 
vec<T> operator + (vec<T>, const vec<T>&);

template<typename T> 
class vec{
public:
    friend vec<T> operator +<T> (vec<T>, const vec<T>&);
// ...

This befriends a specific instance of the operator+() function template, namely operator+<T>. (You can also befriend all instances of a template:

// no forward declarations necessary

template<typename T>
class some_class {
  template<typename U>
  friend void f(vec<U>&);
  // ... 
};

However, that's less often useful than the other one.)

Edit: A comment by David got me thinking (should've done this from the beginning!) and that lead to the discovery that the friend declaration is unnecessary. Your operator+ is only using one public member function of vec (operator+=) and thus doesn't need to be a friend of the class. So the above would simplify to

template<typename T> 
class vec{
public:
    // ...
};

template<typename T> 
vec<T> operator + (vec<T> a, const vec<T>& b){
    a += b;
    return a;
}

Here's a few more notes:

  • operator+() (which you nicely implemented on top of operator+=(), BTW) should take its left argument per copy.
  • Don't declare functions as inline, define them so.
  • Have operator+=() return a non-const reference, because everybody expects f(m1+=m2) to work even if f() takes its argument as a non-const reference.
  • Inside of a class template, in most places you can omit the template parameter list when refering to the class. So you can say vec& operator += (const vec&);. (You cannot do this outside of the template, though - for example, when defining that operator outside of the class.)
  • A std::vector's index type is spelled std::vector<blah>::size_type, not unsigned short.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, and sample. Unfortunately this did not work. I'll keep trying a few things. If you think of anything, I'll be checking back regularly. –  Xoorath Jul 26 '10 at 0:26
    
@Xoorath: "It doesn't work" is too vague to be able to say anything. (I actually have a version here that compiles and links with VC, so I know it does work in principle.) –  sbi Jul 26 '10 at 0:30
    
Sorry buddy. One sec. I'll update my code snippet. –  Xoorath Jul 26 '10 at 0:31
2  
Also, note that you can define operator+ inside the class definition (friend vect operator+( vect lhs, vect const & rhs ) { return lhs+=rhs; }) and this has the advantage of only being found in lookups when either the lhs or rhs are of type vect<T> plus you don't need to perform the double forward declarations. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 26 '10 at 8:43
1  
@Xoorath: The difference isn't between friend or not friend, it's between member or not member. Every non-static member function has an implicit this argument. For operators, this will become the operator's first operand. That's why operators overloaded as members take one argument less than operators overloaded as free functions. Now, friend just says "this guy might touch my private parts". With the friend declaration, a non-member operator+() will have access to the class' privates. Without it, it won't. Since it doesn't need that access, it doesn't need the friend declaration. –  sbi Jul 26 '10 at 19:35

The return type here:

inline friend vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&);

Does not match here:

template<typename T> 
    vec<T>& operator + (const vec<T>& a, const vec<T>& b){
        vec<T> product = a;
        product += b;

        return product;
    } // Addition.
share|improve this answer
    
Also, it's not the function declarations which need to be marked as inline, but the function definitions. So it's friend vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&); and const vec<T>& operator += (const vec<T>&);, but inline vec<T> operator + (const vec<T>&, const vec<T>&) {...} and inline const vec<T>& operator += (const vec<T>&) {...}. Oh, and what's the rationale for having += return a const vec<T>&? I think this should be a non-const reference. –  sbi Jul 25 '10 at 23:50
1  
One more thing (really, I should have made my own answer...): Since the operators left operand will be copied right away, that argument should be passed by copy instead of a const reference. This used to be seen differently (copying is an implementation detail and shouldn't leak into the interface), but smart people found out that making the copy upon passing the argument gives compilers a few more optimization opportunities (such as omitting the copying when the operand is a temporary that's going to be destroyed anyway). –  sbi Jul 26 '10 at 0:01
    
Thank you very much sir. –  Xoorath Jul 26 '10 at 0:02
    
@Xoorath: What @sbi refers to can be read here. Conclusion: If you're going to make a copy, do it in the argument. –  GManNickG Jul 26 '10 at 0:06
    
Unfortunately that actually did not fix my issue. I still get a 2019 with the following: /** friend vec<T> operator + (vec<T>, vec<T>); / and / template<typename T> vec<T> operator + (vec<T> a, vec<T> b){CODE} **/ –  Xoorath Jul 26 '10 at 0:09

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