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I've got a simple object "post" that has two NSMutableArrays as properties. One is for "image" objects and the other is for "video" objects. At some point in the lifecycle of "post", I ask it for a dictionary representation of itself.

NSMutableDictionary *postDict = [post getDictionary];

-(NSMutableDictionary *)getDictionary{

    NSMutableArray *imgDictArry = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:nil];
    NSMutableArray *movDictArry = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:nil];

    for (int i = 0; i<self.images.count; i++) {
        NSMutableDictionary *imgDict = [[self.images objectAtIndex:i] getDictionary];
        [imgDictArry addObject:imgDict];
    }

    for (int i = 0; i<self.videos.count; i++) {
        NSMutableDictionary *movDict = [[self.videos objectAtIndex:i] getDictionary];
        [movDictArry addObject:movDict];
    }

    NSMutableDictionary *postDict = [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                     [NSNumber numberWithBool:self.friendsOnly], @"IsFriendsOnly", 
                                     self.message, @"Message",
                                     self.shortText, @"ShortText",
                                     self.authorId, @"AuthorId",
                                     self.recipientId, @"RecipientId",
                                     self.language, @"Language",
                                     self.lat, @"Lat",
                                     self.lng, @"Lng",
                                     imgDictArry, @"Images",
                                     movDictArry, @"Videos",
                                     nil];

    return postDict;
}

As you can see, the "image" and "video" objects have their own methods for describing themselves as NSMutableDictionary objects.

-(NSMutableDictionary *)getDictionary{
    return [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
            self.nativeURL, @"NativeURL",
            self.previewURL, @"PreviewURL",
            self.smallURL, @"SmallURL",
            self.thumbURL, @"ThumbURL",
            self.imageId, @"ImageId",
            self.width, @"Width",
            self.height, @"Height",
            nil];
}

I'm not getting any errors but my imgDictArry and movDictArry objects are turning out to be NULL after I've set them on the postDict object. If I log them to the console just before this moment, I can see the dictionary data. But the other classes requesting this object is getting null for those properties.

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1  
(Sidenote: it's poor style to preface a property's name with "get" in Objective-C. dictionaryValue and dictionaryRepresentation are better. Or even just dictionary.) –  andyvn22 Jul 26 '10 at 3:24
    
Also, methods generally shouldn't be declared as returning mutable objects, unless you specifically are exposing it to be mutated by the caller (as in NSMutableData's mutableBytes), and you should declare and use macros or global string variables instead of sprinkling copies of the same string literal all over your code. –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 5:04
    
Also, you can just say [NSMutableArray array] instead of using arrayWithObjects:, and you should use fast enumeration instead of looping over the arrays by index. –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 5:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Perhaps one of your functions such as self.shortText (or self.lat...) is returning nil, in which case dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys isn't what you expect it to be: it's truncated to the first function that returns nil...

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Also, all of the objects you pass to dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys: must be objects; passing numeric values will either cause this problem (if 0) or almost-certainly crash (if not 0). You can even get both, if the value is smaller than a pointer (dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys: will consume a pointer's worth no matter what, not realizing that you didn't pass one). –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 5:10
    
Yes, i think that's the most probable cause of this issue. –  JeremyP Jul 26 '10 at 8:10

I changed the postDict creation to this...

NSMutableDictionary *postDict = [NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                     [NSNumber numberWithBool:self.friendsOnly], @"IsFriendsOnly", 
                                     self.message, @"Message",
                                     self.shortText, @"ShortText",
                                     self.authorId, @"AuthorId",
                                     self.recipientId, @"RecipientId",
                                     self.language, @"Language",
                                     self.lat, @"Lat",
                                     self.lng, @"Lng",
                                     nil];

    [postDict setObject:imgDictArry forKey:@"Images"];
    [postDict setObject:movDictArry forKey:@"Videos"];

and it's fixed. But I don't know why.

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E-Madd: Read Zoran Simic's answer. –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 21:16
    
Ohhhhh. Makes sense. Thanks –  E-Madd Jul 27 '10 at 1:02

Since you're using class-methods to create your arrays and dictionairies (which return autoreleased objects), you need to retain them to prevent them from beeing deallocated. that could be the problem.



    NSMutableArray *imgDictArry = [[NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:nil] retain];
    NSMutableArray *movDictArry = [[NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:nil] retain];


and



       NSMutableDictionary *postDict = [[NSMutableDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                     [NSNumber numberWithBool:self.friendsOnly], @"IsFriendsOnly", 
                                     self.message, @"Message",
                                     self.shortText, @"ShortText",
                                     self.authorId, @"AuthorId",
                                     self.recipientId, @"RecipientId",
                                     self.language, @"Language",
                                     self.lat, @"Lat",
                                     self.lng, @"Lng",
                                     imgDictArry, @"Images",
                                     movDictArry, @"Videos",
                                     nil] retain];


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Of course you then have to release them at the appropriate time –  Tobi Jul 26 '10 at 4:55
    
Objects getting deallocated won't cause variables that point to those objects to get set to nil. The variables will still point to the now-dead objects, and trying to use them will cause a crash. –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 5:02
    
Moreover, the dictionary (like any Cocoa collection) will own anything that's put in it, so the array will not get deallocated as long as it's in the dictionary (and as long as you don't over-release it…). –  Peter Hosey Jul 26 '10 at 5:08

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