Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a javascript function

how to check

if function was called ( in <head></head> section have this function ) then not call function

if function was not called ( in <head></head> section haven't this function ) then call function

like require_once or include_once with php

help me thank

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How do you find out the caller function in JavaScript? –  Ralgha Feb 1 '13 at 21:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Two options:

Static variables Here's how to create static (like in C) variables using self calling functions to store your static variables in a closure.

var myFun = (function() {
  var called = false;
  return function() {
    if (!called) {
      console.log("I've been called");
      called = true;
    }
  }
})()

Empty Function replacement Set the function to an empty function after it runs.

function callonce() {
  console.log("I've been called");
  arguments.callee = function() {};
}

Abstract the idea Here's a function that returns a function that only gets called once, this way we don't have to worry about adding boiler plate code to every function.

function makeSingleCallFun(fun) {
  var called = false;
  return function() {
    if (!called) {
       fun.apply(this, arguments);
    }
  }
}

// Alternate implementation   
function makeSingleCallFun(fun) {
    return function() {
      fun.apply(this, arguments);
      arguments.callee = function() {};
    }
}

var myFun = makeSingleCallFun(function() {
  console.log("I've been called");
});
myFun(); // logs I've been called
myFun(); // Does nothing
share|improve this answer
    
Who downvoted this? +1 to balance –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 29 '11 at 11:21
    
I was wondering the same thing. Maybe I deserved it because of my comments on the downsides of some of the answers. –  Juan Mendes Jan 29 '11 at 17:13

Use decorator pattern.

// your function definition
function yourFunction() {}

// decorator
function callItOnce(fn) {
    var called = false;
    return function() {
        if (!called) {
            called = true;
            return fn();
        }
        return;
    }
}

yourFunction(); // it runs
yourFunction(); // it runs    
yourFunction = callItOnce(yourFunction);
yourFunction(); // it runs
yourFunction(); // null

This solution provides a side-effect free way for achieving your goal. You don't have to modify your original function. It works nice even with library functions. You may assign a new name to the decorated function to preserve the original function.

var myLibraryFunction = callItOnce(libraryFunction);
myLibraryFunction(); // it runs
myLibraryFunction(); // null
libraryFunction(); // it runs
share|improve this answer
    
Oh no, I skipped your answer, and added an answer that is almost the same. I'll leave my answer since I also showed a different way. However, how is this the decorator pattern? I think this is more like aspect oriented programming. –  Juan Mendes Jan 29 '11 at 1:47
    
@Juan you are both right, AOP often uses the decorator pattern –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 29 '11 at 11:20

That's easy to accomplish, as javascript functions are objects that can have members and properties:

var callMeOnlyOnce=function(){

    if(this.alreadyCalled)return;

    alert('calling for the first time');

    this.alreadyCalled=true;
};

// alert box comes
callMeOnlyOnce();


// no alert box
callMeOnlyOnce();

EDIT:

As pointed out correctly by CMS, using this is not that easy. Here's a revised version that uses a custom namespace instead of this.

if(!window.mynamespace){
    window.mynamespace={};
}

mynamespace.callMeOnlyOnce=function(){

    if(mynamespace.alreadyCalled)return;

    alert('calling for the first time');
    mynamespace.alreadyCalled=true;
};

// alert box comes
mynamespace.callMeOnlyOnce();


// no alert box
mynamespace.callMeOnlyOnce();
share|improve this answer
1  
The this value refers to the Global object, not to the function itself, and allreadyCalled will end up being a property of the Global object. This is because the function has been invoked from a reference that doesn't have a base object: callMeOnlyOnce();. More info on this –  CMS Jul 26 '10 at 5:34
    
There's no need for a namespace, you essentially have a global variable like meder's example, yours is better since it doesn't require wrapping the function call with a conditional. Look at my answer for solutions without globals, that don't require wrapping the call in a conditional. Some may call it overkill but it gives you insights into how JS works (closures, code overwriting) –  Juan Mendes Jan 29 '11 at 1:26
var called = false;
function blah() {
   called = true;
}

if ( !called ) {
   blah();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
For those global-variable-nazis [since this is in the global scope], you can use blah.called instead of var blah... assuming blah is already defined. This code is pretty enough for me, though. –  Warty Jul 26 '10 at 4:52
    
The disadvantage of this pattern is that you have to wrap the function call in a conditional statement everywhere it gets invoked. –  Török Gábor Jul 26 '10 at 11:59
    
@ItzWarty This is not pretty enough for me, as Török Gábor pointed out. There's a reason globals are bad, so I avoid them like the plague, call me a global-nazi! Plenty of other examples here that don't use a global variable and don't require wrapping the call with a conditional everywhere it's called –  Juan Mendes Jan 29 '11 at 1:22
If (!your_func.called) {
    your_func.called = true;
    your_func();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Out of all the answers, this is the one that requires the most repetition of code. Every call needs to set the flag and be wrapped with a conditional. –  Juan Mendes Jan 29 '11 at 1:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.