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I need an array of this struct allocated in one solid chunk of memory. The length of "char *extension" and "char *type" are not known at compile time.

struct MIMETYPE
{
 char *extension;
 char *type;
};

If I used the "new" operator to initialize each element by itself, the memory may be scattered. This is how I tried to allocate a single contiguous block of memory for it:

//numTypes = total elements of array
//maxExtension and maxType are the needed lengths for the (char*) in the struct
//std::string ext, type;
unsigned int size = (maxExtension+1 + maxType+1) * numTypes;
mimeTypes = (MIMETYPE*)HeapAlloc(GetProcessHeap(), HEAP_ZERO_MEMORY, size);

But, when I try to load the data in like this, the data is all out of order and scattered when I try to access it later.

for(unsigned int i = 0; i < numTypes; i++)
{
 //get data from file
 getline(fin, line);
 stringstream parser.str(line);
 parser >> ext >> type;

 //point the pointers at a spot in the memory that I allocated
 mimeTypes[i].extension = (char*)(&mimeTypes[i]);
 mimeTypes[i].type = (char*)((&mimeTypes[i]) + maxExtension);

 //copy the data into the elements
 strcpy(mimeTypes[i].extension, ext.c_str());
 strcpy(mimeTypes[i].type, type.c_str());
}

can anyone help me out?

EDIT:

unsigned int size = (maxExtension+1 + maxType+1);
mimeTypes = (MIMETYPE*)HeapAlloc(GetProcessHeap(), HEAP_ZERO_MEMORY, size * numTypes);

for(unsigned int i = 0; i < numTypes; i++)
    strcpy((char*)(mimeTypes + (i*size)), ext.c_str());
    strcpy((char*)(mimeTypes + (i*size) + (maxExtension+1)), type.c_str());
share|improve this question
6  
Is there a reason you can't just use std::vector and std::string? –  GManNickG Jul 26 '10 at 8:36
2  
@cppnick: It's a safe wrapper around new[]. I guess what I don't get is: Why does it all have to be contiguous? Could is not a good reason to make premature code-messying optimizations. Get it working first, with good, modern, clean C++, then profile it, see what is actually slow (not what could be slow), and optimize that. –  GManNickG Jul 26 '10 at 8:45
3  
Your best approach would be to write it without the contiguous memory requiremtn. Then put in place a whole load of unit tests to verify behaviour. Then, if you really need the performance improvemnt, refactor to your chosen allocation model, using the tests as a safety net to catch any bugs in your (more complex) code. –  PaulJWilliams Jul 26 '10 at 8:57
1  
Why do you think that contiguous allocation will improve performance? Unless you're doing a linear search (which you shouldn't be, if performance is important), then you'll be accessing the strings in a random order and locality probably won't make any difference. –  Mike Seymour Jul 26 '10 at 10:17
1  
decided to just use std::string. –  bitwise Jul 26 '10 at 17:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll put aside the point that this is premature optimization (and that you ought to just use std::string, std::vector, etc), since others have already stated that.

The fundamental problem I'm seeing is that you're using the same memory for both the MIMETYPE structs and the strings that they'll point to. No matter how you allocate it, a pointer itself and the data it points to cannot occupy the exact same place in memory.


Lets say you needed an array of 3 types and had MIMETYPE* mimeTypes pointing to the memory you allocated for them.

That means you're treating that memory as if it contains:

8 bytes: mime type 0
8 bytes: mime type 1
8 bytes: mime type 2

Now, consider what you're doing in this next line of code:

mimeTypes[i].extension = (char*)(&mimeTypes[i]);

extension is being set to point to the same location in memory as the MIMETYPE struct itself. That is not going to work. When subsequent code writes to the location that extension points to, it overwrites the MIMETYPE structs.

Similarly, this code:

strcpy((char*)(mimeTypes + (i*size)), ext.c_str());

is writing the string data in the same memory that you otherwise want to MIMETYPE structs to occupy.


If you really want store all the necessary memory in one contiguous space, then doing so is a bit more complicated. You would need to allocate a block of memory to contain the MIMETYPE array at the start of it, and then the string data afterwards.

As an example, lets say you need 3 types. Lets also say the max length for an extension string (maxExtension) is 3 and the max length for a type string (maxType) is 10. In this case, your block of memory needs to be laid out as:

8 bytes: mime type 0
8 bytes: mime type 1
8 bytes: mime type 2
4 bytes: extension string 0
11 bytes: type string 0
4 bytes: extension string 1
11 bytes: type string 1
4 bytes: extension string 2
11 bytes: type string 2

So to allocate, setup, and fill it all correctly you would want to do something like:

unsigned int mimeTypeStringsSize = (maxExtension+1 + maxType+1);
unsigned int totalSize = (sizeof(MIMETYPE) + mimeTypeStringsSize) * numTypes;
char* data = (char*)HeapAlloc(GetProcessHeap(), HEAP_ZERO_MEMORY, totalSize);

MIMETYPE* mimeTypes = (MIMETYPE*)data;
char* stringData = data + (sizeof(MIMETYPE) * numTypes);

for(unsigned int i = 0; i < numTypes; i++)
{
    //get data from file
    getline(fin, line);
    stringstream parser.str(line);
    parser >> ext >> type;

    // set pointers to proper locations
    mimeTypes[i].extension = stringData + (mimeTypeStringsSize * i);
    mimeTypes[i].type = stringData + (mimeTypeStringsSize * i) + maxExtension+1;

    //copy the data into the elements
    strcpy(mimeTypes[i].extension, ext.c_str());
    strcpy(mimeTypes[i].type, type.c_str());
}

(Note: I've based my byte layout explanations on typical behavior of 32-bit code. 64-bit code would have more space used for the pointers, but the principle is the same. Furthermore, the actual code I've written here should work regardless of 32/64-bit differences.)

share|improve this answer
    
YES! Thank you! For some reason, the fact that the pointers would take up memory slipped my mind. I haven't tried this out yet, but my error seems totally obvious now. –  bitwise Jul 28 '10 at 5:15
    
Checked now. Works perfectly. thanks again –  bitwise Jul 28 '10 at 6:31

You really have to know the length of extension and type in order to allocate MIMETYPEs contiguously (if "contiguously" means that extension and type are actually allocated within the object). Since you say that the length of extension and type are not known at compile time, you cannot do this in an array or a vector (the overall length of a vector can be set and changed at runtime, but the size of the individual elements must be known at compile time, and you can't know that size without knowing the length of extension and type).

I would personally recommend using a vector of MIMETYPEs, and making the extension and type fields both strings. You're requirements sound suspiciously like premature optimization guided by a gut feeling that dereferencing pointers is slow, especially if the pointers cause cache misses. I wouldn't worry about that until you have actual data that reading these fields is an actual bottleneck.

However, I can think of a possible "solution": you can allocate the extension and type strings inside the MIMETYPE object when they are shorter than a particular threshold and allocate them dynamically otherwise:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cstring>
#include <new>

template<size_t Threshold> class Kinda_contig_string {
    char contiguous_buffer[Threshold];
    char* value;

    public:

    Kinda_contig_string() : value(NULL) { }

    Kinda_contig_string(const char* s)
    {
         size_t length = std::strlen(s);
         if (s < Threshold) {
             value = contiguous_buffer;
         }
         else {
             value = new char[length];
         }

         std::strcpy(value, s);
    }

    void set(const char* s)
    {
        size_t length = std::strlen(s);

        if (length < Threshold && value == contiguous_buffer) {
            // simple case, both old and new string fit in contiguous_buffer
            // and value points to contiguous_buffer
            std::strcpy(contiguous_buffer, s);
            return;
        }

        if (length >= Threshold && value == contiguous_buffer) {
            // old string fit in contiguous_buffer, new string does not
            value = new char[length];
            std::strcpy(value, s);
            return;
        }

        if (length < Threshold && value != contiguous_buffer) {
            // old string did not fit in contiguous_buffer, but new string does
            std::strcpy(contiguous_buffer, s);
            delete[] value;
            value = contiguous_buffer;
            return;
        }

        // old and new strings both too long to fit in extension_buffer
        // provide strong exception guarantee
        char* temp_buffer = new char[length];
        std::strcpy(temp_buffer, s);
        std::swap(temp_buffer, value);
        delete[] temp_buffer;
        return;
    }

    const char* get() const
    {
        return value;
    }
}

class MIMETYPE {
    Kinda_contig_string<16> extension;
    Kinda_contig_string<64> type;

  public:
    const char* get_extension() const
    {
        return extension.get();
    }

    const char* get_type() const
    {
        return type.get();
    }

    void set_extension(const char* e)
    {
        extension.set(e);
    }

    // t must be NULL terminated
    void set_type(const char* t)
    {
        type.set(t);
    }

    MIMETYPE() : extension(), type() { }

    MIMETYPE(const char* e, const char* t) : extension(e), type(t) { }
};

I really can't endorse this without feeling guilty.

share|improve this answer
1  
Effectively what you've implemented is known as the small string optimization and it's very likely already implemented in you standard library's std::string class - and it's guaranteed to be bug-free. You're duplicating code already implemented, tested, and proven to be useful. Really, you first need to measure whether this is necessary at all, before doing such optimizations. Visage's comment is the best answer to this question: First write the code so that it is clean and works, along with tests. Then profile, then optimize, using the tests to make sure nothing breaks. –  sbi Jul 26 '10 at 10:44
    
I fixed some bugs in the implementation. I would like to point out that I agreed with you when I wrote the original answer, which is why I wrote the entire second paragraph. And it's why I wrote the last paragraph as well. –  Max Lybbert Jul 27 '10 at 6:23
    
"I fixed some bugs in the implementation." Really, that's the reason you shouldn't do this. Unless you're Donald Knuth, these things tend to never work out of the box. Using a tested and proven implementation is much better. –  sbi Jul 27 '10 at 10:08
    
"Unless you're Donald Knuth, these things tend to never work out of the box." That's funny. I just finished reading "Literate Programming" and my two favorite chapters were "The Errors of TeX" (general discussion of the classes and causes of errors) and "The TeX Error Log" (a raw error log). –  Max Lybbert Jul 27 '10 at 17:03

What you need to do is get a garbage collector and manage the heap. A simple collector using RAII for object destruction is not that difficult to write. That way, you can simply allocate off the collector and know that it's going to be contiguous. However, you should really, REALLY profile before determining that this is a serious problem for you. When that happens, you can typedef many std types like string and stringstream to use your custom allocator, meaning that you can go back to just std::string instead of the C-style string horrors you have there.

share|improve this answer
    
Just bought SC2 today... LOL @ Evil volcano planet "Char" –  bitwise Jul 28 '10 at 8:14

Add one byte in between strings... extension and type are not \0-terminated the way do it.

here you allocate allowing for an extra \0 - OK

unsigned int size = (maxExtension+1 + maxType+1) * numTypes;
mimeTypes = (MIMETYPE*)HeapAlloc(GetProcessHeap(), HEAP_ZERO_MEMORY, size);

here you don't leave any room for extension's ending \0 (if string len == maxExtension)

 //point the pointers at a spot in the memory that I allocated
 mimeTypes[i].extension = (char*)(&mimeTypes[i]);
 mimeTypes[i].type = (char*)((&mimeTypes[i]) + maxExtension);

instead i think it should be

 mimeTypes[i].type = (char*)((&mimeTypes[i]) + maxExtension + 1);
share|improve this answer
    
you are right, and also, I shouldn't be using mimeTypes[i] as the offset because its only 2 bytes...I added the code I would have to use above, but I am getting access violations trying to use it –  bitwise Jul 26 '10 at 10:05

You mix 2 allocation:

1) manage array of MIMETYPE and

2) manage array of characters

May be (I don't really understand your objectives):

struct MIMETYPE
{
    char extension[const_ofmaxExtension];
    char type[maxType];
};

would be better to allocate linear items in form:

new MIMETYPE[numTypes];
share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me (although this just begs the question what's wrong with std::string). –  sbi Jul 26 '10 at 8:45
1  
const_ofmaxExtension is not known at compile time, and trying to save memory. –  bitwise Jul 26 '10 at 8:46
    
@cppnick - it just my notation, that you must use there constant expression (not variable). For c++ it is enough to declare **const unsigned maxExtension = ... ** –  Dewfy Jul 26 '10 at 9:15

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