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I am not an expert in MySQL . I need to find out rank of customers. Here I am adding the corresponding ANSI standard SQL query for my requirement. Please help me to convert it to MySQL .

 SELECT RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY Gender ORDER BY Age) AS [Partition by Gender], 
   FirstName, 
   Age,
   Gender 
 FROM Person

Is there any function to find out rank in MySQL?

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marked as duplicate by George Stocker Nov 13 at 21:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 102 down vote accepted

One option is to use a ranking variable, such as the following:

SELECT    first_name,
          age,
          gender,
          @curRank := @curRank + 1 AS rank
FROM      person p, (SELECT @curRank := 0) r
ORDER BY  age;

The (SELECT @curRank := 0) part allows the variable initialization without requiring a separate SET command.

Test case:

CREATE TABLE person (id int, first_name varchar(20), age int, gender char(1));

INSERT INTO person VALUES (1, 'Bob', 25, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (2, 'Jane', 20, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (3, 'Jack', 30, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (4, 'Bill', 32, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (5, 'Nick', 22, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (6, 'Kathy', 18, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (7, 'Steve', 36, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (8, 'Anne', 25, 'F');

Result:

+------------+------+--------+------+
| first_name | age  | gender | rank |
+------------+------+--------+------+
| Kathy      |   18 | F      |    1 |
| Jane       |   20 | F      |    2 |
| Nick       |   22 | M      |    3 |
| Bob        |   25 | M      |    4 |
| Anne       |   25 | F      |    5 |
| Jack       |   30 | M      |    6 |
| Bill       |   32 | M      |    7 |
| Steve      |   36 | M      |    8 |
+------------+------+--------+------+
8 rows in set (0.02 sec)
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22  
+1 for the devious inline initialization, that's a beautiful trick. –  Charles Jul 26 '10 at 9:42
12  
Didn't he ask for a partition though? My understanding of partitions is that the result set would have separate rankings for male and female. –  Jesse Dhillon Jul 27 '10 at 17:32
1  
@Jesse: If that is the case, I recently answered a similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3162389/multiple-ranks-in-one-table –  Daniel Vassallo Jul 27 '10 at 17:44
2  
What if I want to give rank as 4 to Anne and Bob both? –  Fahim Parkar Jan 16 '12 at 9:14
1  
This does not implement the example from the question as it misses the partition by gender part of the analytical function (which "numbers" the rank value per gender not for the overall result) –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 4 '12 at 13:24

Here is a generic solution that sorts a table based on a column and assigns rank; rows with ties are assigned same rank (uses an extra variable for this purpose):

SET @prev_value = NULL;
SET @rank_count = 0;
SELECT id, rank_column, CASE
    WHEN @prev_value = rank_column THEN @rank_count
    WHEN @prev_value := rank_column THEN @rank_count := @rank_count + 1
END AS rank
FROM rank_table
ORDER BY rank_column

Note that there are two assignment statements in the second WHEN clause. Sample data:

CREATE TABLE rank_table(id INT, rank_column INT);
INSERT INTO rank_table (id, rank_column) VALUES
(1, 10),
(2, 20),
(3, 30),
(4, 30),
(5, 30),
(6, 40),
(7, 50),
(8, 50),
(9, 50);

Output:

+------+-------------+------+
| id   | rank_column | rank |
+------+-------------+------+
|    1 |          10 |    1 |
|    2 |          20 |    2 |
|    3 |          30 |    3 |
|    4 |          30 |    3 |
|    5 |          30 |    3 |
|    6 |          40 |    4 |
|    7 |          50 |    5 |
|    8 |          50 |    5 |
|    9 |          50 |    5 |
+------+-------------+------+

SQL Fiddle

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This solution, or Mukesh's solution, should be the correct solution. Although technically I believe both of you guys' solutions represent a dense ranking and not a regular rank. Here is a good explanation of the differences: sqlservercurry.com/2009/04/…. –  Lucas Jun 3 at 11:06
    
perfecto .....,. –  atjoshi Jul 31 at 17:25

A tweak of Daniel's version to calculate percentile along with rank. Also two people with same marks will get the same rank.

set @totalStudents = 0;
select count(*) into @totalStudents from marksheets;
SELECT id, score, @curRank := IF(@prevVal=score, @curRank, @studentNumber) AS rank, 
@percentile := IF(@prevVal=score, @percentile, (@totalStudents - @studentNumber + 1)/(@totalStudents)*100),
@studentNumber := @studentNumber + 1 as studentNumber, 
@prevVal:=score
FROM marksheets, (
SELECT @curRank :=0, @prevVal:=null, @studentNumber:=1, @percentile:=100
) r
ORDER BY score DESC

Results of the query for a sample data -

+----+-------+------+---------------+---------------+-----------------+
| id | score | rank | percentile    | studentNumber | @prevVal:=score |
+----+-------+------+---------------+---------------+-----------------+
| 10 |    98 |    1 | 100.000000000 |             2 |              98 |
|  5 |    95 |    2 |  90.000000000 |             3 |              95 |
|  6 |    91 |    3 |  80.000000000 |             4 |              91 |
|  2 |    91 |    3 |  80.000000000 |             5 |              91 |
|  8 |    90 |    5 |  60.000000000 |             6 |              90 |
|  1 |    90 |    5 |  60.000000000 |             7 |              90 |
|  9 |    84 |    7 |  40.000000000 |             8 |              84 |
|  3 |    83 |    8 |  30.000000000 |             9 |              83 |
|  4 |    72 |    9 |  20.000000000 |            10 |              72 |
|  7 |    60 |   10 |  10.000000000 |            11 |              60 |
+----+-------+------+---------------+---------------+-----------------+
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1  
Even though this isn't really optimal in performance, it's awesome! –  Damieh Feb 13 '12 at 14:41

@Sam, your point is excellent in concept but I think you misunderstood what the MySQL docs are saying on the referenced page -- or I misunderstand :-) -- and I just wanted to add this so that if someone feels uncomfortable with the @Daniel's answer they'll be more reassured or at least dig a little deeper.

You see the "@curRank := @curRank + 1 AS rank" inside the SELECT is not "one statement", it's one "atomic" part of the statement so it should be safe.

The document you reference goes on to show examples where the same user-defined variable in 2 (atomic) parts of the statement, for example, "SELECT @curRank, @curRank := @curRank + 1 AS rank".

One might argue that @curRank is used twice in @Daniel's answer: (1) the "@curRank := @curRank + 1 AS rank" and (2) the "(SELECT @curRank := 0) r" but since the second usage is part of the FROM clause, I'm pretty sure it is guaranteed to be evaluated first; essentially making it a second, and preceding, statement.

In fact, on that same MySQL docs page you referenced, you'll see the same solution in the comments -- it could be where @Daniel got it from; yeah, I know that it's the comments but it is comments on the official docs page and that does carry some weight.

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If you want to rank just one person you can do the following:

SELECT COUNT(Age) + 1
 FROM PERSON
WHERE(Age < age_to_rank)

This ranking corresponds to the oracle RANK function (Where if you have people with the same age they get the same rank, and the ranking after that is non-consecutive).

It's a little bit faster than using one of the above solutions in a subquery and selecting from that to get the ranking of one person.

This can be used to rank everyone but it's slower than the above solutions.

SELECT
  Age AS age_var,
(
  SELECT COUNT(Age) + 1
  FROM Person
  WHERE (Age < age_var)
 ) AS rank
 FROM Person
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Combination of Daniel's and Salman's answer. However the rank will not give as continues sequence with ties exists . Instead it skips the rank to next. So maximum always reach row count.

    SELECT    first_name,
              age,
              gender,
              IF(age=@_last_age,@curRank:=@curRank,@curRank:=@_sequence) AS rank,
              @_sequence:=@_sequence+1,@_last_age:=age
    FROM      person p, (SELECT @curRank := 1, @_sequence:=1, @_last_age:=0) r
    ORDER BY  age;

Schema and Test Case:

CREATE TABLE person (id int, first_name varchar(20), age int, gender char(1));

INSERT INTO person VALUES (1, 'Bob', 25, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (2, 'Jane', 20, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (3, 'Jack', 30, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (4, 'Bill', 32, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (5, 'Nick', 22, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (6, 'Kathy', 18, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (7, 'Steve', 36, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (8, 'Anne', 25, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (9, 'Kamal', 25, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (10, 'Saman', 32, 'M');

Output:

+------------+------+--------+------+--------------------------+-----------------+
| first_name | age  | gender | rank | @_sequence:=@_sequence+1 | @_last_age:=age |
+------------+------+--------+------+--------------------------+-----------------+
| Kathy      |   18 | F      |    1 |                        2 |              18 |
| Jane       |   20 | F      |    2 |                        3 |              20 |
| Nick       |   22 | M      |    3 |                        4 |              22 |
| Kamal      |   25 | M      |    4 |                        5 |              25 |
| Anne       |   25 | F      |    4 |                        6 |              25 |
| Bob        |   25 | M      |    4 |                        7 |              25 |
| Jack       |   30 | M      |    7 |                        8 |              30 |
| Bill       |   32 | M      |    8 |                        9 |              32 |
| Saman      |   32 | M      |    8 |                       10 |              32 |
| Steve      |   36 | M      |   10 |                       11 |              36 |
+------------+------+--------+------+--------------------------+-----------------+
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While the most upvoted answer ranks, it doesn't partition, You can do a self Join to get the whole thing partitioned also:

SELECT    a.first_name,
      a.age,
      a.gender,
        count(b.age)+1 as rank
FROM  person a left join person b on a.age>b.age and a.gender=b.gender 
group by  a.first_name,
      a.age,
      a.gender

Use Case

CREATE TABLE person (id int, first_name varchar(20), age int, gender char(1));

INSERT INTO person VALUES (1, 'Bob', 25, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (2, 'Jane', 20, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (3, 'Jack', 30, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (4, 'Bill', 32, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (5, 'Nick', 22, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (6, 'Kathy', 18, 'F');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (7, 'Steve', 36, 'M');
INSERT INTO person VALUES (8, 'Anne', 25, 'F');

Answer:

Bill    32  M   4
Bob     25  M   2
Jack    30  M   3
Nick    22  M   1
Steve   36  M   5
Anne    25  F   3
Jane    20  F   2
Kathy   18  F   1
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