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I need a Function like that:

class Class_A
{
     ...
     bool ShowVariableConstituents( CString ( * ValueOutput )( double ) );
     ...
}

bool Class_A::ShowVariableConstituents( CString ( * ValueOutput )( double ) )
{
    double dUncalculatedValue;
    ....

    if( ValueOutput  )
    {
       CString strValue = ValueOutput( dUncalculatedValue );
    }
    ....
 }

Here is an example how i need to use it:

class Class_B : Class_A
{
   ...
   int Calculate();
   CString ValueOutput( double dValue );
   ...
}

CString Class_B::ValueOutput( double dValue )
{
 CString strValue;
 strValue.Format("%6.2f", ( dValue / m_dAmount * 100 ) );
 return strValue;
}

int Class_B::Calculate()
{
...
ShowVariableConstituents( & Class_B::ValueOutput );
...
}

I get the Error:

Error 1 error C2664: ' Class_A::ShowVariableConstituents': conversion of Parameter 1 from 'CString (__thiscall Class_B::* )(double)' in 'CString (__cdecl *)(double)' not possible

Can you help me do it right?

regards camelord

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A few questions: Is ShowVariableConstituents private? Does ShowVariableConstituents have to accept any function or just methods of Class_B (possibly inherited)? Does ValueOutput have to be an instance method? It doesn't look like so in the example, but example might be simplified. –  Maciej Hehl Jul 26 '10 at 12:09
    
And one more question. On what instance of a class do You want to call ValueOutput in ShowVariableConstituents. The same as the one on which ShowVariableConstituents is called or possibly some other? –  Maciej Hehl Jul 26 '10 at 12:10
    
I have updated my answer with working code to demonstrate the concept I was talking about. Please ignore the Qt-specific items. It's the only IDE I had at the moment. –  San Jacinto Jul 26 '10 at 12:22
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To make it possible to pass pointers to member functions you should modify your function as follows:

bool ShowVariableConstituents( CString ( Class_A::* ValueOutput )( double ) )

But it will not help since you want to pass the pointer to Class_B::ValueOutput and Class_A doesn't know anything about Class_B.

Your option is to make your function template:

template<typename UnaryOperator>
bool Class_A::ShowVariableConstituents( UnaryOperator op )
{
    double dUncalculatedValue;
    CString strValue = op( dUncalculatedValue );
    return true; // false ?
 }

Then you could use it as follows:

int Class_B::Calculate()
{
    ShowVariableConstituents( std::bind1st( std::mem_fun( &Class_B::ValueOutput ), this ) );
    return 0; // put your code here
}
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this is cool! Thx for the template tip. –  camelord Jul 26 '10 at 12:22
    
Nice! Thanks for showing this to all of us. –  San Jacinto Jul 26 '10 at 12:34
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I believe the answer you're looking for is the answer to my question here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3259686/stdtr1function-and-stdtr1bind

my adapt_integrate is your A::ShowVariableConstituents and my integrand is your ValueOutput. It's not completely the same, but the issue you are having is that a non-static class member function will implicitely pass a this reference to the class object that it "resides" in. I believe that the __thiscall Class_B::* part is exactly that. You will need to wrap the function you want to call in a static member function.

If needed, I could try translating the answer to my question to code in your case, but I don't think I'm capable enough :)

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You can not send a pointer-to-method to a function/method receiving a pointer-to-a-free-function.

Think about it, a method requires a pointer to the object (this) on which it is applied.

Edit:

In your case, if all clients of A::ShowVariableConstituents actually derive from A (such as B does) than you might have a virtual method CString A::ValueOutput(double) which would be overrided in the derived classes and called from A::ShowVariableConstituents().

BTW, this would be an instance of the Template method design pattern.

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this works in my case, but the template tip is more gerneric. –  camelord Jul 26 '10 at 12:23
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Please read up on why pointers to non-static members are not supported. http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html

If you are looking to build something similar to a closure where you can pass an object's member function around and modify state on that object anonymously through this function, you could either pass "this" into each function (which isn't always possible), or you can use functors.

A functor is a class that is comprised mainly of just an operator(). What you'd do (and I haven't tested this, EVER) is create a base class with pure virtual operator(). In your derived classes, you can create a pointer inside the derived class to point to the object whose state you wish to modify. You would also implement a virtual operator() in the derived classes.

Inside the class whose state you want to modify, you create an instance of this derived class (which must be a friend). You instantiate this derived object with the "this" pointer of the class you wish to modify.

So when you want to pass this functor around in your code, you would pass state_modified_class.derived_functor_class instead of a pointer to a member function of state_modified_class. Your function showvariableconstituents would take a parameter of base_functor_class instead of a function pointer.

As I said, this is all theory. I don't know if it will actually work. I'm not a C++ expert.

edit:

#include <QtCore/QCoreApplication>
#include <iostream>;
using namespace std;

class BaseFunctor
{
public:
    virtual void operator()() = 0;
};

class StateMod
{
    friend class DerivedFunctor;

public:

    class DerivedFunctor : public BaseFunctor
    {

    public:

        DerivedFunctor(StateMod * tempths)
        {
             ths = tempths;
        }

        virtual void operator()()
        {
            ths->temp++;
        }

    private:
        StateMod * ths;
    };

    DerivedFunctor derived;


    StateMod(int x = 0) : derived(this)
    {
        this->temp = x;
    }

    void printTemp()
    {
        cout << "temp: " << temp << endl;
    }

    private:
    int temp;
};


class demonstration
{
public:

    void doit(BaseFunctor & basefunct)
    {
        basefunct();
    }
};


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QCoreApplication a(argc, argv);

    StateMod moddy;
    demonstration demo;


    moddy.printTemp();

    demo.doit(moddy.derived);

    moddy.printTemp();

    return a.exec();
}
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Oh no! i just wanted to be able to let the caller of ShowVariableConstituents(..) handle the output of a calculated double value. What else can i do? –  camelord Jul 26 '10 at 12:07
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