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I am trying to write a regex that selects everything between two characters.

For example, when the regex encounters a '§' I want it to select everything after the '§' sign, up until the point that the regex encounters a ';'. I tried with a lookbehind and lookahead, but they don't really do the trick.

So for example " § 1-2 bla; " should return " 1-2 bla".

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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2  
Please specify the technology in which you are working, as regex has many "flavours" with slightly different syntaxes and capabilities. –  Jay Jul 26 '10 at 14:08
    
Wait, I missed this first time around... "I tried with a lookbehind and lookahead, but they don't really do the trick." -- why not? what went wrong? Is this JavaScript? –  Peter Boughton Jul 26 '10 at 14:54
    
Because I'm new to RegEx and couldn't really figure it out.. It's RegEx in Actionscript 3, and it does really weird things from time to time :) thanks for your answers everyone, I kind of got things working ! –  Jaaq Jul 27 '10 at 7:50

3 Answers 3

How about

"§([^;]*);"

The selected characters between the § and ; are available as match group 1.

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Use this regex

(?<=§).*?(?=;)
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I'd go with the clearer [^;]* over .*? but still should be ok. Still, +1 for using lookarounds. :) –  Peter Boughton Jul 26 '10 at 14:29
    
:) good suggestion. thanks. –  Gopi Jul 26 '10 at 14:30

For a simple case this should do:

§(.*);

It might need to be modified if you don't want to allow nesting:

§(.*?);
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1  
This isn't quite correct - the .* is greedy, so the expression will match upto the last ; encountered, not the first one. –  Peter Boughton Jul 26 '10 at 14:30
    
@Peter: it might not be the issue for OP, and it might be what OP actually wants. –  SilentGhost Jul 26 '10 at 14:31
    
Well based on "up until the point that the regex encounters a ';'" -- I take that to mean it shouldn't be greedy. –  Peter Boughton Jul 26 '10 at 14:53
    
@Peter: well based on given example it doesn't matter if quantifier is greedy or not. –  SilentGhost Jul 26 '10 at 15:09

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