Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I’m currently using the @property decorator to achieve “getters and setters” in a couple of my classes. I wish to be able to inherit these @property methods in a child class.

I have some Python code (specifically, I’m working in py3k) which looks vaguely like so:

class A:
    @property
    def attr(self):
        try:
            return self._attr
        except AttributeError:
            return ''

class B(A):
    @property
    def attr(self):
        return A.attr   # The bit that doesn't work.

    @attr.setter
    def attr(self, value):
        self._attr = value

if __name__ == '__main__':
    b = B()
    print('Before set:', repr(b.attr))
    b.attr = 'abc'
    print(' After set:', repr(b.attr))

I have marked the part that doesn’t work with a comment. I want the base class’ attr getter to be returned. A.attr returns a property object (which is probably very close to what I need!).

Edit:
After receiving the answer below from Ned I thought up what I think is a more elegant solution to this problem.

class A:
    @property
    def attr(self):
        try:
            return self._attr
        except AttributeError:
            return ''

class B(A):        
    @A.attr.setter
    def attr(self, value):
        self._attr = value

if __name__ == '__main__':
    b = B()
    print('Before set:', repr(b.attr))
    b.attr = 'abc'
    print(' After set:', repr(b.attr))

The .setter decorator expects a property object which we can get using @A.attr. This means we do not have to declare the property again in the child class.

(This is the difference between working on a problem at the end of the day vs working on it at the beginning of the day!)

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you want:

class B(A):
    @property
    def attr(self):
        return super(B, self).attr()

You mention wanting to return the parent class's getter, but you need to invoke the getter, not return it.

Updated with corrections from the comments:

class B(A):
    @property
    def attr(self):
        return super(B, self).attr
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn’t work for me, however, if I call super().attr I get the desired effect. Is that a wise thing to do? – casr Jul 26 '10 at 16:29
    
Ah, you're right, because the parent's .attr is not available as an invokable getter any more, only as a property. super() is the way to access same-named attributes from parent classes. Why would it be an un-wise thing to do? – Ned Batchelder Jul 26 '10 at 16:37
    
Just checking. I didn’t have a reason against. Update your reply to have super().attr instead of super(B, self).attr() and I’ll mark it as answered :) Thanks for the hint! – casr Jul 26 '10 at 17:42
1  
You got it! I'll do almost anything for that big green checkmark! :) – Ned Batchelder Jul 26 '10 at 18:00
1  
Learn something new every day: super() with no args is Py3.x only... – Ned Batchelder Jul 26 '10 at 19:07

To override a setter in python 2 I did this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._attr = None

    @property
    def attr(self):
        return self._attr

    @attr.setter
    def attr(self, value):
        self._attr = value


class B(A):
    @A.attr.setter
    def attr(self, value):
        # Do some crazy stuff with `value`
        value = value[0:3]
        A.attr.fset(self, value)
share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly enough, B doesn't have to inherit the getter from A. If B only inherited from object, B.attr.fget will return <function Foo.baz at 0x123456789>. I was concerned that A.attr.fset has now been assigned a user-defined function. A.attr.fset is still None, while B.attr.fset is <function B.baz at 0x987654321>. So overriding any of the property's accessibility members, creates a copy of the property first. At least, that appears to be what is happening. – Tyler Crompton Jan 22 '13 at 17:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.